Tea (rec.drink.tea) Discussion relating to tea, the world's second most consumed beverage (after water), made by infusing or boiling the leaves of the tea plant (C. sinensis or close relatives) in water.

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Old 08-04-2010, 11:27 AM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default Amacha and dulcin

Hi,

A Japanese "tea" named Amacha (or also Buddha Tea) is made
of Hortensia leaves. It has a very sweet taste of liquorice.

I see that it naturally contains dulcin.

However, dulcin is a sugar substitute that is said to be
dangerous (possible carcinogenic properties, and dependency)
Is it the same for the natural dulcin in Amacha?

Have you ever heard something about the dangerosity of Amacha and
its consumption?

Thanks beforehand,

--
Julien ÉLIE

« Give laugh to all but smile to one,
Give cheeks to all but lips to one,
Give love to all but Heart to one,
Let everybody love you
But you love one. »


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Old 08-04-2010, 02:46 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default Amacha and dulcin

In the past I would have told you to ask in alt.folklore.herbs.
Unfortunately it has been obliterated by everything and anything but a
discussion of herbs. This group is still good for asking about
typical dried flowers and fruit added to tea. We do have people who
are familiar with Japanese teas so maybe they came across this herb.

Jim

On Apr 8, 4:27 am, Julien ÉLIE
wrote:
Hi,

A Japanese "tea" named Amacha (or also Buddha Tea) is made
of Hortensia leaves. It has a very sweet taste of liquorice.

I see that it naturally contains dulcin.

However, dulcin is a sugar substitute that is said to be
dangerous (possible carcinogenic properties, and dependency)
Is it the same for the natural dulcin in Amacha?

Have you ever heard something about the dangerosity of Amacha and
its consumption?

Thanks beforehand,

--
Julien LIE

Give laugh to all but smile to one,
Give cheeks to all but lips to one,
Give love to all but Heart to one,
Let everybody love you
But you love one.

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Old 09-04-2010, 03:39 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default Amacha and dulcin

Hi--

For what it is worth, the Japanese Wikipedia mentions the phyllo-
dulcin, but does not report health concerns about drinking this tea.

Amacha, in Japanese, is literally sweet (ama) tea (cha).

I suspect the concern is about the highly concentrated phyllo-dulcin
extract rather than the amacha itself. Also, it does not seem that
this is a wildly popular drink in Japan. I lived in Japan for 6
years, but never heard of it except for its ritual use in bathing
statues of the just-born historical Buddha in April. There are
apparently certain regions where people drink it regularly, though
this would certainly be a small population.

For anybody who was confused (as I was), "hortensia" is another name
for what I have always called "hydrangea."

james-henry holland
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Old 12-04-2010, 08:15 AM
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Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Julien ÉLIE View Post
Hi,

A Japanese "tea" named Amacha (or also Buddha Tea) is made
of Hortensia leaves. It has a very sweet taste of liquorice.

I see that it naturally contains dulcin.

However, dulcin is a sugar substitute that is said to be
dangerous (possible carcinogenic properties, and dependency)
Is it the same for the natural dulcin in Amacha?

Have you ever heard something about the dangerosity of Amacha and
its consumption?

Thanks beforehand,

--
Julien ÉLIE

« Give laugh to all but smile to one,
Give cheeks to all but lips to one,
Give love to all but Heart to one,
Let everybody love you
But you love one. »
sorry i have never heard of it. maybe you can try some healthier tea which is safe.
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www.5ktea.com, the number-one Chinese online teashop ,enjoys the reputation for the best teas and services.
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Old 12-04-2010, 09:43 AM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default Amacha and dulcin

Thanks all for your answers.

For what it is worth, the Japanese Wikipedia mentions the phyllo-
dulcin, but does not report health concerns about drinking this tea.


Which does not mean there is no health concerns :-/


For anybody who was confused (as I was), "hortensia" is another name
for what I have always called "hydrangea."


Yep!

--
Julien ÉLIE

« Après la clairière d'attente, on entre dans la hutte
de consultation. » (Astérix)



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