Tea (rec.drink.tea) Discussion relating to tea, the world's second most consumed beverage (after water), made by infusing or boiling the leaves of the tea plant (C. sinensis or close relatives) in water.

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Default Way of Making Dahongpao Tea

Step 1
It is better to make the tea of 7-10g with a potof 105ml water. As for
the volume, it is better to make the tea for 1/3 - 1/2 of the pot.

Step 2
The water temperature should be up to 100 ℃ . The tea in the water
should be remained for 10-30 seconds. Later on, with each refilling of
hot boiled water, the remaining time should be 10-20 seconds longer.
The principle should be that the tea colour should be the same after
being refilled for 6 times. The refilling should be more than 6
times.

Step 3
Way of Making Tea: The boiled water should be poured a little bit
higher than the cup edge. Then, get rid of the foam on the surfaces of
the pot and cup with the lids. Cover the pot and cup with the lids
after being washed. As for drinking the tea, it is better to pour the
tea lower than the cup edge.

more at http://forum.teainchina.biz/topic-59.html

many Chinese teas in http://www.teainchina.biz
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Default Way of Making Dahongpao Tea

You'd end up with syrup. You'd be better off making the tea in a
water fountain and insuring proper aeration. I did this once with a
tea for a group. Make sure you have the little gongfu cups to fill
from the waterfall. It was a pain keeping the pump filter clear of
leaves.

Jim

wrote:
> Step 1
> It is better to make the tea of 7-10g with a potof 105ml water. As for
> the volume, it is better to make the tea for 1/3 - 1/2 of the pot.
>
> Step 2
> The water temperature should be up to 100 ℃ . The tea in the water
> should be remained for 10-30 seconds. Later on, with each refilling of
> hot boiled water, the remaining time should be 10-20 seconds longer.
> The principle should be that the tea colour should be the same after
> being refilled for 6 times. The refilling should be more than 6
> times.
>
> Step 3
> Way of Making Tea: The boiled water should be poured a little bit
> higher than the cup edge. Then, get rid of the foam on the surfaces of
> the pot and cup with the lids. Cover the pot and cup with the lids
> after being washed. As for drinking the tea, it is better to pour the
> tea lower than the cup edge.
>

thats a nono
> more at

shame on you
> many Chinese teas in

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Default Way of Making Dahongpao Tea


Hey Jim,
Actually, you're right and wrong, in my opinion, at the same time: While that method would produce a strong brew, I'd brew it even more aggressively with more leaf in the pot, using a somewhat smaller pot. A really fine and properly roasted DHP would not only withstand this treatment, it would welcome it. Ya gotta give it a try. You might be pleasantly surprised. (At this strength, an extra dollop of care and attention is required.) Those are my humble opinions.
Michael

> You'd end up with syrup. You'd be better off making the tea in a water
> fountain and insuring proper aeration. I did this once with a tea for a
> group. Make sure you have the little gongfu cups to fill from the
> waterfall. It was a pain keeping the pump filter clear of leaves.
> Jim


> wrote:
>> Step 1 It is better to make the tea of 7-10g with a potof 105ml water.
>> As for the volume, it is better to make the tea for 1/3 - 1/2 of the pot.
>> Step 2 The water temperature should be up to 100 ℃ . The tea in
>> the water should be remained for 10-30 seconds. Later on, with each
>> refilling of hot boiled water, the remaining time should be 10-20 seconds
>> longer. The principle should be that the tea colour should be the same
>> after being refilled for 6 times. The refilling should be more than 6
>> times.
>> Step 3 Way of Making Tea: The boiled water should be poured a little bit
>> higher than the cup edge. Then, get rid of the foam on the surfaces of
>> the pot and cup with the lids. Cover the pot and cup with the lids after
>> being washed. As for drinking the tea, it is better to pour the tea
>> lower than the cup edge.


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Default Way of Making Dahongpao Tea

Gongfu gone wild as I see it. Have you seen the 10ml pots? All you
have to do is spit. You dont hang around as much. Got other things
to do?

Jim

Michael Plant wrote:
> Hey Jim,
> Actually, you're right and wrong, in my opinion, at the same time: While that method would produce a strong brew, I'd brew it even more aggressively with more leaf in the pot, using a somewhat smaller pot. A really fine and properly roasted DHP would not only withstand this treatment, it would welcome it. Ya gotta give it a try. You might be pleasantly surprised. (At this strength, an extra dollop of care and attention is required.) Those are my humble opinions.
> Michael
>
> > You'd end up with syrup. You'd be better off making the tea in a water
> > fountain and insuring proper aeration. I did this once with a tea for a
> > group. Make sure you have the little gongfu cups to fill from the
> > waterfall. It was a pain keeping the pump filter clear of leaves.
> > Jim

>
> > wrote:
> >> Step 1 It is better to make the tea of 7-10g with a potof 105ml water.
> >> As for the volume, it is better to make the tea for 1/3 - 1/2 of the pot.
> >> Step 2 The water temperature should be up to 100 ℃ . The tea in
> >> the water should be remained for 10-30 seconds. Later on, with each
> >> refilling of hot boiled water, the remaining time should be 10-20 seconds
> >> longer. The principle should be that the tea colour should be the same
> >> after being refilled for 6 times. The refilling should be more than 6
> >> times.
> >> Step 3 Way of Making Tea: The boiled water should be poured a little bit
> >> higher than the cup edge. Then, get rid of the foam on the surfaces of
> >> the pot and cup with the lids. Cover the pot and cup with the lids after
> >> being washed. As for drinking the tea, it is better to pour the tea
> >> lower than the cup edge.

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Default Way of Making Dahongpao Tea


> Gongfu gone wild as I see it. Have you seen the 10ml pots? All you have
> to do is spit. You dont hang around as much. Got other things to do?


> Jim


My favorite pots these days are around 60ml. What can I say? Whatever turns ya on, I guess. I have been super-busy, and somethings gotta give when things get like that.
Michael


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On Jul 29, 6:48*pm, Michael Plant > wrote:
> > Gongfu gone wild as I see it. *Have you seen the 10ml pots? *All you have
> > to do is spit. *You dont hang around as much. *Got other things to do?
> > Jim

>
> My favorite pots these days are around 60ml. What can I say? *Whatever turns ya on, I guess. I have been super-busy, and somethings gotta give when things get like that.
> Michael


Michael,
Where did you get your 60ml yixing pots from? I've been looking for
some that size.
Thanks.
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snip


>> My favorite pots these days are around 60ml. What can I say? *Whatever
>> turns ya on, I guess. I have been super-busy, and somethings gotta give
>> when things get like that. Michael


> Michael, Where did you get your 60ml yixing pots from? I've been looking
> for some that size. Thanks.


Hi,
Sorry to be late answering. I get little pot at The Tea Gallery in New York City. I haven't looked very carefully at their web site, which is now up and running, so I don't know if they have teaware for sale via internet. Michael and Winnie, the owners, are on vacation for the next couple weeks, but internet commerce continues. Unfortunately, their brick and mortor shop will be mostly closed. They have pots of even smaller sizes. These, of course, are *not* toys, but traditional gung fu pots. I'm very pleased with mine. I drink tea with it about three times a week. It teaches me much, and makes good tea dance, sing, and sparkle.
Michael
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You mean the the ones that look like they were made for a dollhouse.
Gongfu Reductio Ad Absurdum.

Jim

Michael Plant wrote:
> > Michael, Where did you get your 60ml yixing pots from? I've been looking
> > for some that size. Thanks.


> They have pots of even smaller sizes. These, of course, are *not* toys, but traditional gung fu pots.
> Michael

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Jim, I certainly see your point, but no. Each steep yields a tiny half cup of tea for two or three people, and the tea is brewed to perfection -- not, of course, by me, but by those who've been doing it all their lives. The rule of thumb is this: Use a teapot that will yield exactly the amount of tea you need for the size of your group for each steep; nothing left over. Of course, the care and attention required for this is rapidly becoming a thing of the past. Sic transit gloria mundi, as they say.
Michael


> You mean the the ones that look like they were made for a dollhouse.
> Gongfu Reductio Ad Absurdum.
> Jim


>>> Michael, Where did you get your 60ml yixing pots from? I've been
>>> looking for some that size. Thanks.


>> They have pots of even smaller sizes. These, of course, are *not* toys,
>> but traditional gung fu pots. Michael




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On Aug 6, 4:20 pm, Michael Plant > wrote:
> Jim, I certainly see your point, but no. Each steep yields a tiny half cup of tea for two or three people, and the tea is brewed to perfection -- not, of course, by me, but by those who've been doing it all their lives. The rule of thumb is this: Use a teapot that will yield exactly the amount of tea you need for the size of your group for each steep; nothing left over. Of course, the care and attention required for this is rapidly becoming a thing of the past. Sic transit gloria mundi, as they say.
> Michael


I've actually begun the move to smaller vessels both gaiwan and now
looking into the Yixing side. Your post has finally been the push I
needed to try it out. I have found some nice 3.5-4oz. Yixing, but I
think 2oz./60ml may be too small too soon for me.

If you could share, approx. how much leaf is used in a 60ml teapot?
What type of tea are you drinking from it? I have found for me that I
am enjoying 3.5oz. brewed in my gaiwan to be the sweet spot and I
don't go crazy on the leaf maybe a teaspoon of tea or so depending
with occasionally more leaf and more steeps when I have the time.

- Dominic


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Gongfu for Lilliputians. What is the purpose of pots 1oz/30ml and
smaller? I've seen one that would fit on my thumbnail. I can see
bonzai in the form but not function.

Jim

Michael Plant wrote:
> Jim, I certainly see your point, but no. Each steep yields a tiny half cup of tea for two or three people, and the tea is brewed to perfection -- not, of course, by me, but by those who've been doing it all their lives. The rule of thumb is this: Use a teapot that will yield exactly the amount of tea you need for the size of your group for each steep; nothing left over. Of course, the care and attention required for this is rapidly becoming a thing of the past. Sic transit gloria mundi, as they say.
> Michael
>
>
> > You mean the the ones that look like they were made for a dollhouse.
> > Gongfu Reductio Ad Absurdum.
> > Jim

>
> >>> Michael, Where did you get your 60ml yixing pots from? I've been
> >>> looking for some that size. Thanks.

>
> >> They have pots of even smaller sizes. These, of course, are *not* toys,
> >> but traditional gung fu pots. Michael

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On Aug 7, 8:31*am, Space Cowboy > wrote:
> Gongfu for Lilliputians. *What is the purpose of pots 1oz/30ml and
> smaller? *I've seen one that would fit on my thumbnail. *I can see
> bonzai in the form but not function.
>
> Jim
>
> Michael Plant wrote:
> > Jim, I certainly see your point, but no. Each steep yields a tiny half cup of tea for two or three people, and the tea is brewed to perfection -- not, of course, by me, but by those who've been doing it all their lives. The rule of thumb is this: Use a teapot that will yield exactly the amount of tea you need for the size of your group for each steep; nothing left over.. Of course, the care and attention required for this is rapidly becoming a thing of the past. Sic transit gloria mundi, as they say.
> > Michael

>
> > > You mean the the ones that look like they were made for a dollhouse.
> > > Gongfu Reductio Ad Absurdum.
> > > Jim

>
> > >>> Michael, Where did you get your 60ml yixing pots from? *I've been
> > >>> looking for some that size. *Thanks.

>
> > >> They have pots of even smaller sizes. *These, of course, are *not* toys,
> > >> but traditional gung fu pots. Michael


one breath at a time. The air will still be there : )
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On 2008-08-13, toki > wrote:
> one breath at a time. The air will still be there : )


But is it really water vapor?


N., ducking
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I think you tilt your head back and pour the pot in your nostrils.

Jim

toki wrote:
> On Aug 7, 8:31?am, Space Cowboy > wrote:
> > Gongfu for Lilliputians.


> > Michael Plant wrote:
> > > >> They have pots of even smaller sizes. ?These, of course, are *not* toys,


> one breath at a time. The air will still be there : )

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On Aug 13, 8:14*am, Space Cowboy > wrote:
> I think you tilt your head back and pour the pot in your nostrils.
>
> Jim
>
> toki wrote:
> > On Aug 7, 8:31?am, Space Cowboy > wrote:
> > > Gongfu for Lilliputians.
> > > Michael Plant wrote:
> > > > >> They have pots of even smaller sizes. ?These, of course, are *not* toys,

> > one breath at a time. The air will still be there : )


haha, thanks for the solid laugh this morning... a true LOL. Dear lord
I hope this doesn't spawn a new thread that never ends. And hey, Mike
you never got back to me on the amounts/process of the brewing in
these little buggers... I want to pour quality brewed dahongpao into
my sinuses here.

- Dominic
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