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  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Peter Aitken
 
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Default More on boiling eggs

I thought it would be worthwhile to see what Harold McGee has to say about
this favorite topic. This is from the new edition of "On Food and Cooking"

Cracking: usually caused by the eggs being knocked about due to too-fast
boiling water. Poking a hole in the end of the egg does not help.

Tough whites: Caused by too-hot cooking temp. Best to cook in barely
simmering water which is 10-20 degrees cooler than actively boiling water.

Hard to peel: usually caused by really fresh eggs. If you have only fresh
eggs, add 1/2 tsp baking soda to 1 qt cooking water. This can help.

Green yolks: more prevalent with older eggs. Over cooking, cooking at too
high a temp, and not cooling rapidly also contribute.


--
Peter Aitken

Remove the crap from my email address before using.


  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article >,
"Peter Aitken" > wrote:

> I thought it would be worthwhile to see what Harold McGee has to say about
> this favorite topic. This is from the new edition of "On Food and Cooking"
>
> Cracking: usually caused by the eggs being knocked about due to too-fast
> boiling water. Poking a hole in the end of the egg does not help.
>
> Tough whites: Caused by too-hot cooking temp. Best to cook in barely
> simmering water which is 10-20 degrees cooler than actively boiling water.
>
> Hard to peel: usually caused by really fresh eggs. If you have only fresh
> eggs, add 1/2 tsp baking soda to 1 qt cooking water. This can help.


Steaming worked for me. ;-)
They were VERY fresh eggs!

>
> Green yolks: more prevalent with older eggs. Over cooking, cooking at too
> high a temp, and not cooling rapidly also contribute.


Timing. No green yolks, I timed them for 10 minutes.

Thanks again to the folks that recommended steaming!
Those shells just slipped off! I'm going to do them this way from now
on.....

No cracked eggs either.

--
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


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  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Janet Bostwick
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Katra" > wrote in message
...
snip
> Steaming worked for me. ;-)
> They were VERY fresh eggs!
>
>>
>> Green yolks: more prevalent with older eggs. Over cooking, cooking at too
>> high a temp, and not cooling rapidly also contribute.

>
> Timing. No green yolks, I timed them for 10 minutes.
>
> Thanks again to the folks that recommended steaming!
> Those shells just slipped off! I'm going to do them this way from now
> on.....
>
> No cracked eggs either.
>
> --
> K.

thanks for coming up with the timing on that. I will continue to steam eggs
for hard cooked as well.
Janet


  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
--
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Peter Aitken" > wrote in message
news
> I thought it would be worthwhile to see what Harold McGee has to say about
> this favorite topic. This is from the new edition of "On Food and Cooking"
>
> Cracking: usually caused by the eggs being knocked about due to too-fast
> boiling water. Poking a hole in the end of the egg does not help.
>
> Tough whites: Caused by too-hot cooking temp. Best to cook in barely
> simmering water which is 10-20 degrees cooler than actively boiling water.


an interesting trick -- getting the small bubbles of water vapor rising
in/creating the upward currents from the bottom of the pot to the top to be
less than 212F, or getting that actively boiling water to be more than 212F.
(SP)

especially interesting since I have in the past measured water heating in
various containers in this very range, and observed the fluid and the
surface in order to get some indications for visually determining the 205F
point suggested for making superb coffee (coffee is better using this temp,
btw).
Simmer was defined by small bubbles just breaking the surface, or just
below the surface

I thought about him using a thin pan and really high heat source to get
the 20 degree differentiual he is talking about, but it looks like that
results in higher current in the water due to the higher differential and
transfer... wouldn't do it.
A thick pan would heat slower and more mass would rise until it almost
would full-boil right after simmer.

Of course, if he created a solution by adding salt and soda to the mix, the
boiling point would go up from the 212 F of tap water - so if you have
fresh eggs and follow his advice, you must get accept tough whites....

Maybe his recipes are better than his egg theory?

>
> Hard to peel: usually caused by really fresh eggs. If you have only fresh
> eggs, add 1/2 tsp baking soda to 1 qt cooking water. This can help.
>
> Green yolks: more prevalent with older eggs. Over cooking, cooking at too
> high a temp, and not cooling rapidly also contribute.


He must boil his eggs in oil to boil eggs at too high a temp.

Tonight, I think I am going to use the water vapor method lauded by the
users of this NG -

what was that method one more time?

Eggs from refrig to counter to active steamer, steam for 20 minutes, cool in
cold water?

>
>
> --
> Peter Aitken
>
> Remove the crap from my email address before using.
>
>



  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
Janet Bostwick
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"--" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Peter Aitken" > wrote in message
> news
>> I thought it would be worthwhile to see what Harold McGee has to say
>> about
>> this favorite topic. This is from the new edition of "On Food and
>> Cooking"
>>
>> Cracking: usually caused by the eggs being knocked about due to too-fast
>> boiling water. Poking a hole in the end of the egg does not help.
>>
>> Tough whites: Caused by too-hot cooking temp. Best to cook in barely
>> simmering water which is 10-20 degrees cooler than actively boiling
>> water.

>
> an interesting trick -- getting the small bubbles of water vapor rising
> in/creating the upward currents from the bottom of the pot to the top to
> be
> less than 212F, or getting that actively boiling water to be more than
> 212F.
> (SP)
>
> especially interesting since I have in the past measured water heating in
> various containers in this very range, and observed the fluid and the
> surface in order to get some indications for visually determining the 205F
> point suggested for making superb coffee (coffee is better using this
> temp,
> btw).
> Simmer was defined by small bubbles just breaking the surface, or just
> below the surface
>
> I thought about him using a thin pan and really high heat source to get
> the 20 degree differentiual he is talking about, but it looks like that
> results in higher current in the water due to the higher differential and
> transfer... wouldn't do it.
> A thick pan would heat slower and more mass would rise until it almost
> would full-boil right after simmer.
>
> Of course, if he created a solution by adding salt and soda to the mix,
> the
> boiling point would go up from the 212 F of tap water - so if you have
> fresh eggs and follow his advice, you must get accept tough whites....
>
> Maybe his recipes are better than his egg theory?
>
>>
>> Hard to peel: usually caused by really fresh eggs. If you have only fresh
>> eggs, add 1/2 tsp baking soda to 1 qt cooking water. This can help.
>>
>> Green yolks: more prevalent with older eggs. Over cooking, cooking at too
>> high a temp, and not cooling rapidly also contribute.

>
> He must boil his eggs in oil to boil eggs at too high a temp.
>
> Tonight, I think I am going to use the water vapor method lauded by the
> users of this NG -
>
> what was that method one more time?
>
> Eggs from refrig to counter to active steamer, steam for 20 minutes, cool
> in
> cold water?
>

I used refrigerator-cold eggs, cold tap water, the eggs in the steamer
basket and brought water to boil/steam. Katra refined the timing to 10
minutes of steaming followed by 10 minutes of standing, pot covered, heat
off. Then plunge the eggs into cold or iced water.
Janet




  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
--
 
Posts: n/a
Default

> I used refrigerator-cold eggs, cold tap water, the eggs in the steamer
> basket and brought water to boil/steam. Katra refined the timing to 10
> minutes of steaming followed by 10 minutes of standing, pot covered, heat
> off. Then plunge the eggs into cold or iced water.
> Janet


ok - thanx much ---

"Janet Bostwick" > wrote in message
...
>
> "--" > wrote in message
> ...
> >
> > "Peter Aitken" > wrote in message
> > news
> >> I thought it would be worthwhile to see what Harold McGee has to say
> >> about
> >> this favorite topic. This is from the new edition of "On Food and
> >> Cooking"
> >>
> >> Cracking: usually caused by the eggs being knocked about due to

too-fast
> >> boiling water. Poking a hole in the end of the egg does not help.
> >>
> >> Tough whites: Caused by too-hot cooking temp. Best to cook in barely
> >> simmering water which is 10-20 degrees cooler than actively boiling
> >> water.

> >
> > an interesting trick -- getting the small bubbles of water vapor rising
> > in/creating the upward currents from the bottom of the pot to the top to
> > be
> > less than 212F, or getting that actively boiling water to be more than
> > 212F.
> > (SP)
> >
> > especially interesting since I have in the past measured water heating

in
> > various containers in this very range, and observed the fluid and the
> > surface in order to get some indications for visually determining the

205F
> > point suggested for making superb coffee (coffee is better using this
> > temp,
> > btw).
> > Simmer was defined by small bubbles just breaking the surface, or just
> > below the surface
> >
> > I thought about him using a thin pan and really high heat source to

get
> > the 20 degree differentiual he is talking about, but it looks like that
> > results in higher current in the water due to the higher differential

and
> > transfer... wouldn't do it.
> > A thick pan would heat slower and more mass would rise until it almost
> > would full-boil right after simmer.
> >
> > Of course, if he created a solution by adding salt and soda to the mix,
> > the
> > boiling point would go up from the 212 F of tap water - so if you have
> > fresh eggs and follow his advice, you must get accept tough whites....
> >
> > Maybe his recipes are better than his egg theory?
> >
> >>
> >> Hard to peel: usually caused by really fresh eggs. If you have only

fresh
> >> eggs, add 1/2 tsp baking soda to 1 qt cooking water. This can help.
> >>
> >> Green yolks: more prevalent with older eggs. Over cooking, cooking at

too
> >> high a temp, and not cooling rapidly also contribute.

> >
> > He must boil his eggs in oil to boil eggs at too high a temp.
> >
> > Tonight, I think I am going to use the water vapor method lauded by the
> > users of this NG -
> >
> > what was that method one more time?
> >
> > Eggs from refrig to counter to active steamer, steam for 20 minutes,

cool
> > in
> > cold water?
> >

> I used refrigerator-cold eggs, cold tap water, the eggs in the steamer
> basket and brought water to boil/steam. Katra refined the timing to 10
> minutes of steaming followed by 10 minutes of standing, pot covered, heat
> off. Then plunge the eggs into cold or iced water.
> Janet
>
>



  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article >,
"Janet Bostwick" > wrote:

> "Katra" > wrote in message
> ...
> snip
> > Steaming worked for me. ;-)
> > They were VERY fresh eggs!
> >
> >>
> >> Green yolks: more prevalent with older eggs. Over cooking, cooking at too
> >> high a temp, and not cooling rapidly also contribute.

> >
> > Timing. No green yolks, I timed them for 10 minutes.
> >
> > Thanks again to the folks that recommended steaming!
> > Those shells just slipped off! I'm going to do them this way from now
> > on.....
> >
> > No cracked eggs either.
> >
> > --
> > K.

> thanks for coming up with the timing on that. I will continue to steam eggs
> for hard cooked as well.
> Janet
>
>


Welcome! :-)
It's what the folks on my poultry list said...

On a note tho', I did not remove them right away from the heat when I
turned it off. They sat for about another 5 minutes before I took them
out and added the cold water......

I take it this worked for you too???

I'm thrilled. I tend to avoid hard cooked eggs because they were SUCH a
PITA tro try to peel and this time of year, I'm getting too many eggs...

Dad bought new chicks last fall and they are getting going... Red sex
links! Excellent layers but they don't live very long. About 4 years. :-(

Kat

--
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...user id=katra
  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article >,
"Janet Bostwick" > wrote:

> "--" > wrote in message
> ...
> >
> > "Peter Aitken" > wrote in message
> > news
> >> I thought it would be worthwhile to see what Harold McGee has to say
> >> about
> >> this favorite topic. This is from the new edition of "On Food and
> >> Cooking"
> >>
> >> Cracking: usually caused by the eggs being knocked about due to too-fast
> >> boiling water. Poking a hole in the end of the egg does not help.
> >>
> >> Tough whites: Caused by too-hot cooking temp. Best to cook in barely
> >> simmering water which is 10-20 degrees cooler than actively boiling
> >> water.

> >
> > an interesting trick -- getting the small bubbles of water vapor rising
> > in/creating the upward currents from the bottom of the pot to the top to
> > be
> > less than 212F, or getting that actively boiling water to be more than
> > 212F.
> > (SP)
> >
> > especially interesting since I have in the past measured water heating in
> > various containers in this very range, and observed the fluid and the
> > surface in order to get some indications for visually determining the 205F
> > point suggested for making superb coffee (coffee is better using this
> > temp,
> > btw).
> > Simmer was defined by small bubbles just breaking the surface, or just
> > below the surface
> >
> > I thought about him using a thin pan and really high heat source to get
> > the 20 degree differentiual he is talking about, but it looks like that
> > results in higher current in the water due to the higher differential and
> > transfer... wouldn't do it.
> > A thick pan would heat slower and more mass would rise until it almost
> > would full-boil right after simmer.
> >
> > Of course, if he created a solution by adding salt and soda to the mix,
> > the
> > boiling point would go up from the 212 F of tap water - so if you have
> > fresh eggs and follow his advice, you must get accept tough whites....
> >
> > Maybe his recipes are better than his egg theory?
> >
> >>
> >> Hard to peel: usually caused by really fresh eggs. If you have only fresh
> >> eggs, add 1/2 tsp baking soda to 1 qt cooking water. This can help.
> >>
> >> Green yolks: more prevalent with older eggs. Over cooking, cooking at too
> >> high a temp, and not cooling rapidly also contribute.

> >
> > He must boil his eggs in oil to boil eggs at too high a temp.
> >
> > Tonight, I think I am going to use the water vapor method lauded by the
> > users of this NG -
> >
> > what was that method one more time?
> >
> > Eggs from refrig to counter to active steamer, steam for 20 minutes, cool
> > in
> > cold water?
> >

> I used refrigerator-cold eggs, cold tap water, the eggs in the steamer
> basket and brought water to boil/steam. Katra refined the timing to 10
> minutes of steaming followed by 10 minutes of standing, pot covered, heat
> off. Then plunge the eggs into cold or iced water.
> Janet
>
>


Oops! Wrote 5 in that last post... I'm 1/2 asleep. ;-)
I was awake when I posted 10 minutes.

That was the correct time for standing........

Sorry!

Kat

--
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...user id=katra
  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Monsur Fromage du Pollet
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"--" > wrote in
:

> He must boil his eggs in oil to boil eggs at too high a temp.
>
> Tonight, I think I am going to use the water vapor method lauded by
> the users of this NG -
>
> what was that method one more time?
>
> Eggs from refrig to counter to active steamer, steam for 20 minutes,
> cool in cold water?
>



From when my name was hahabogus.

***I only tried 10 eggs as the steamer holds a max of 10***
So everywhere it says a dozen replace with 10.


From: Hahabogus )
Subject: hard boiling eggs in a steamer

View this article only
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking
Date: 2005-02-11 07:09:01 PST

"Dimitri" > wrote in
m:

>
> "Hahabogus" > wrote in message
> ...
> >
> > For Xmas this year I bought myself a steamer...from sears.
> > It came with a egg tray.
> > I tried it out this week.
> > None of the eggs were hard to unpeel, none of the shell stuck to the
> > eggs. Usually when I make hard boiled eggs (pot on stove) the shell
> > sticks to at least a couple of the eggs...but not this time.
> > --
> > No Bread Crumbs were hurt in the making of this Meal.
> > Type 2 Diabetic 1AC 5.6mmol or 101mg/dl
> > Continuing to be Manitoban

>
> Anyway to check the age of the eggs?
>
> Let us know if it continues to work the same way.
>
>
> Dimitri
>
>
>




The eggs were bought last weekend. The large grade eggs were those flax
fed chicken type ...up here called 'omega eggs' . I was really impressed,
easiest peeling eggs I ever had. I have no clue where the manual went for
the steamer...I just steamed the dozen eggs for 20 minutes and left them
to cool in the steamer (forgot about them for 2 hours). *In other words
the electric steamer went 'ding' and I peeled the eggs after they reached
room temp.*
No internal signs
of the eggs being over cooked. Same taste as other hard boiled eggs.

My working theory is the eggs cooked slower and that helped prevent the
dreaded sticking shell.


--
No Bread Crumbs were hurt in the making of this Meal.
Type 2 Diabetic 1AC 5.6mmol or 101mg/dl
Continuing to be Manitoban

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