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Old 03-06-2009, 01:21 AM posted to rec.food.sourdough
hutchndi hutchndi is offline
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Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 222
Default Balance Out Time

Thanks Dicky.

True, the just revived and refreshed starter smells fresh and maybe a
little fruity even, and then towards the end of bulk fermentation of the
dough the aroma matures to what I remember in a dough made with continuously
active starter.

The main reasons I started doing it this way are the long times between
uses, either I neglect the starter for too long and it turns into something
my wife secretly flushes when I am not looking, or I start getting that
acetone smell from refrigerator acclimation (I know everybody says there is
no harm in that, but I just don't care for that smell). I don't mind doing
it this way if it keeps me from needing to find a new glob of culture every
few months, even though there is usually someone here more than willing to
help out. Seems to be working for me so far, but I have only done this a few
times.

hutchndi

"Dick Adams" wrote in message
...

"hutchndi" wrote in message
...
It gets good and bubbly active after only one
refreshment, but I doubt if the balance is optimum.


If its good and bubbly, its good enough to start some sourdough.

By the time the dough is ready for the oven, if all has gone well,
the balance is shifted towards the bacteria.

A stiff culture can be kept in the fridge (unfrozen) for at least a
month, probably two or three. It takes less time (maybe 12 hours
less) to reconsititue a starter from a fridge culture than from frozen
dry.

Or so it seems to me.

--
Dicky