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Preserving (rec.food.preserving) Devoted to the discussion of recipes, equipment, and techniques of food preservation. Techniques that should be discussed in this forum include canning, freezing, dehydration, pickling, smoking, salting, and distilling.

Thuringer?



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 12-10-2003, 02:22 PM
Sean Elkins
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Thuringer?

Has ayone ever heard of a preserved meat product called Thuringer? I am
under the impression that it's someting that is made from game meat,
but I could be wrong.

Info, anyone?

--
Sean Elkins RKBA
Owenton, KY
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  #2 (permalink)  
Old 12-10-2003, 07:33 PM
Len
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Thuringer?


"Sean Elkins" wrote in message
...
Has ayone ever heard of a preserved meat product called Thuringer? I am
under the impression that it's someting that is made from game meat,
but I could be wrong.

Info, anyone?

--
Sean Elkins RKBA
Owenton, KY


Her is one of several recipes. Thuringer is a type of summer sausage.
http://home.pacbell.net/lpoli/thuringer.pdf


  #3 (permalink)  
Old 12-10-2003, 09:40 PM
Melba's Jammin'
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Thuringer?

In article , Sean Elkins
wrote:

Has ayone ever heard of a preserved meat product called Thuringer? I am
under the impression that it's someting that is made from game meat,
but I could be wrong.

Info, anyone?


It's a kind of sausage. I'm sure what my mom bought when we were kids
was not a game meat sausage but it can probably be made from, say,
venison. Around here (MN) there are specialty butcher shops that will
make Polish sausage from venison. Let's see, Deer Hunting opens in
about 3-4 weeks, I think. I'll see ads in the newspaper for it then.
:-)
--
-Barb (www.jamlady.eboard.com updated 10-10-03; check the PickleHats tab)
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 24-10-2003, 03:46 PM
Lori T.
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Thuringer?

It is a deli meat you can get at supermarkets........

--
Women and Infants Hospital
Providence, Rhode Island
"Sean Elkins" wrote in message
...
Has ayone ever heard of a preserved meat product called Thuringer? I am
under the impression that it's someting that is made from game meat,
but I could be wrong.

Info, anyone?

--
Sean Elkins RKBA
Owenton, KY



  #5 (permalink)  
Old 26-10-2003, 01:11 AM
Mark Preston
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Thuringer?

Sean Elkins wrote snip

Sean,

How nice to see somebody using a regular email name and address.

The National Hot Dog & Sausage Council:

http://www.hot-dog.org/hd_sausage_glossary.htm

defines Thuringer as:

Thuringer Cervelat

See Cervelat.

Thuringer-Style Sausage -- (fresh sausage or cooked sausage)
Made principally of ground pork; may also include veal and beef;
seasoning similar to pork sausage, except no sage is used; may be
smoked or unsmoked.

and Cervelat as:

Cervelat -- (semi-dry sausage)
General classification for mildly seasoned smoked, semi-dry sausages.
Popularly termed "Summer Sausage".

FARMER CERVELAT contains equal parts of coarsely chopped pork and
beef; cured, dried and delicately seasoned, without garlic.

GOETTINGER CERVELAT is a high quality dry, hard sausage; pork and
beef; delightfully spiced.

GOTEBORG CERVELAT is made of coarsely chopped pork and beef; heavily
smoked, seasoning is salty and somewhat sweet from the spice,
cardamon; of Swedish origin.

GOTHAER is a cervelat of German origin; made only of very lean pork,
finely chopped and cured.

HOLSTEINER CERVELAT is similar to farmer cervelat, but packed in a
ring-shaped style.

LANDJAEGER CERVELAT is a semi-dry sausage of Swiss origin; beef and
pork; heavily smoked with a black, wrinkled appearance; in links the
size of large franks, but pressed flat.

THURINGER CERVELAT is a popular semi-dry sausage made of beef and ham
or pork fat; distinctive tangy flavor; mildly spiced.

but I suspect that you are asking about Thuringer as it was made in
Thuringer, more than 100 years ago.

I also found a wonder webpage about Thuringer

http://members.uia.net/alsc/pages/geinen.html

In Wisconsin the bratwurst is not just a staple food item but the
centerpiece of a vibrant cultural esthetic. Like the Texas barbecue
and the New England clam bake, the Wisconsin brat fry has its own
traditional set menu, rich folklore and strictly observed rituals.
Wisconsonites are nuts about their bratwurst, and once you've had the
brat experience, you will understand why. The hot dog pales in
comparison to the stalwart, meaty brat.

For a genuine Wisconsin brat fry, it's important to get the right kind
of brat. The various breeds of bratwurst can quickly confuse the
uninitiated. There are any number of recipes, but the main spices
usually include sage, mace, rosemary, thyme and celery seed.

You may have seen fleshy, white brats in your local grocery. These are
the Nürnberger variety, also known as veal bratwurst, and are made of
a mixture of veal and pork. Münchner veal bratwurst is similar in
appearance but has a slightly spicier flavor. Veal brats, like hot
dogs, are sold fully precooked and need only to be browned on a grill.

But for our Wisconsin Brat Fry, the brat we want is all pork. This is
the Thuringer bratwurst, named for Thuringia, the central German
region where it originated. You will recognize it by its mottled
appearance, like Italian sausage. Thuringers, in contrast to the veal
types, are sold raw...

Before grilling, bratwursts are poached in a broth of beer, flavored
with onions, butter, black pepper and maybe a little garlic. The
simmering beer cooks the meat, while the subsequent grilling contracts
the sausage skin to give it the snap that is characteristic of a great
bratwurst.
The practice of cooking brats in beer before grilling isn't as
traditional back in the Old Country as it has become in Wisconsin.
Gary Troub, bratwurst maker and proprietor of the European Deluxe
Sausage kitchen in Beverly Hills, believes it to be an American
innovation. He only heard of the method upon moving to Los Angeles 11
years ago from his home near Koblenz in the Rhineland.

'Cooking in the beer, that's more something they do more in Milwaukee.
Germans, we like to put the beer here,' says Troub, pointing to his
mouth with his thumb."

There a

Pigeons as Thuringer

http://www.capuchine.com/pigeons/Bre...WingPigeon.htm

as well as Rabbits:

http://www.tiho-hannover.de/einricht...cript/1813.htm
The page above says the Thuringer rabbit, useful for fur and food, was
"created" in 1895. So if Thuringer Sausasge was made from it; the
product is very new on the food scene.

Of some interest is:

http://www.nutribase.com/fishmeat.shtml

Thuringer Cervelat - A fresh, smoked sausage named after the former
German region of Thuringia. Coriander (also called "cilantro") is an
important spice used in this variety of sausage.

I think the above author is confused. I would understand ground, dried
coriander, but not fresh coriander leaves (in Spanish: Cilantro)

Please also see:

http://www.msue.msu.edu/imp/mod01/01600617.html
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 26-10-2003, 01:25 AM
LIMEYNO1
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Thuringer?

It may be nice to see somebody using a regular email name and address.
That's what I did until a few minutes ago.

Then I received a pornographic email using my email in a forged header. I
can't imagine how many people this guy has sent this crap to using my email
address. And I'm a Christian. It's sooo disgusting!


"Mark Preston" wrote in message
om...
Sean Elkins wrote snip

Sean,

How nice to see somebody using a regular email name and address.

The National Hot Dog & Sausage Council:

http://www.hot-dog.org/hd_sausage_glossary.htm

defines Thuringer as:

Thuringer Cervelat

See Cervelat.

Thuringer-Style Sausage -- (fresh sausage or cooked sausage)
Made principally of ground pork; may also include veal and beef;
seasoning similar to pork sausage, except no sage is used; may be
smoked or unsmoked.

and Cervelat as:

Cervelat -- (semi-dry sausage)
General classification for mildly seasoned smoked, semi-dry sausages.
Popularly termed "Summer Sausage".

FARMER CERVELAT contains equal parts of coarsely chopped pork and
beef; cured, dried and delicately seasoned, without garlic.

GOETTINGER CERVELAT is a high quality dry, hard sausage; pork and
beef; delightfully spiced.

GOTEBORG CERVELAT is made of coarsely chopped pork and beef; heavily
smoked, seasoning is salty and somewhat sweet from the spice,
cardamon; of Swedish origin.

GOTHAER is a cervelat of German origin; made only of very lean pork,
finely chopped and cured.

HOLSTEINER CERVELAT is similar to farmer cervelat, but packed in a
ring-shaped style.

LANDJAEGER CERVELAT is a semi-dry sausage of Swiss origin; beef and
pork; heavily smoked with a black, wrinkled appearance; in links the
size of large franks, but pressed flat.

THURINGER CERVELAT is a popular semi-dry sausage made of beef and ham
or pork fat; distinctive tangy flavor; mildly spiced.

but I suspect that you are asking about Thuringer as it was made in
Thuringer, more than 100 years ago.

I also found a wonder webpage about Thuringer

http://members.uia.net/alsc/pages/geinen.html

In Wisconsin the bratwurst is not just a staple food item but the
centerpiece of a vibrant cultural esthetic. Like the Texas barbecue
and the New England clam bake, the Wisconsin brat fry has its own
traditional set menu, rich folklore and strictly observed rituals.
Wisconsonites are nuts about their bratwurst, and once you've had the
brat experience, you will understand why. The hot dog pales in
comparison to the stalwart, meaty brat.

For a genuine Wisconsin brat fry, it's important to get the right kind
of brat. The various breeds of bratwurst can quickly confuse the
uninitiated. There are any number of recipes, but the main spices
usually include sage, mace, rosemary, thyme and celery seed.

You may have seen fleshy, white brats in your local grocery. These are
the Nürnberger variety, also known as veal bratwurst, and are made of
a mixture of veal and pork. Münchner veal bratwurst is similar in
appearance but has a slightly spicier flavor. Veal brats, like hot
dogs, are sold fully precooked and need only to be browned on a grill.

But for our Wisconsin Brat Fry, the brat we want is all pork. This is
the Thuringer bratwurst, named for Thuringia, the central German
region where it originated. You will recognize it by its mottled
appearance, like Italian sausage. Thuringers, in contrast to the veal
types, are sold raw...

Before grilling, bratwursts are poached in a broth of beer, flavored
with onions, butter, black pepper and maybe a little garlic. The
simmering beer cooks the meat, while the subsequent grilling contracts
the sausage skin to give it the snap that is characteristic of a great
bratwurst.
The practice of cooking brats in beer before grilling isn't as
traditional back in the Old Country as it has become in Wisconsin.
Gary Troub, bratwurst maker and proprietor of the European Deluxe
Sausage kitchen in Beverly Hills, believes it to be an American
innovation. He only heard of the method upon moving to Los Angeles 11
years ago from his home near Koblenz in the Rhineland.

'Cooking in the beer, that's more something they do more in Milwaukee.
Germans, we like to put the beer here,' says Troub, pointing to his
mouth with his thumb."

There a

Pigeons as Thuringer

http://www.capuchine.com/pigeons/Bre...WingPigeon.htm

as well as Rabbits:

http://www.tiho-hannover.de/einricht...cript/1813.htm
The page above says the Thuringer rabbit, useful for fur and food, was
"created" in 1895. So if Thuringer Sausasge was made from it; the
product is very new on the food scene.

Of some interest is:

http://www.nutribase.com/fishmeat.shtml

Thuringer Cervelat - A fresh, smoked sausage named after the former
German region of Thuringia. Coriander (also called "cilantro") is an
important spice used in this variety of sausage.

I think the above author is confused. I would understand ground, dried
coriander, but not fresh coriander leaves (in Spanish: Cilantro)

Please also see:

http://www.msue.msu.edu/imp/mod01/01600617.html



  #7 (permalink)  
Old 26-10-2003, 03:24 AM
zxcvbob
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Thuringer?

LIMEYNO1 wrote:
It may be nice to see somebody using a regular email name and address.
That's what I did until a few minutes ago.

Then I received a pornographic email using my email in a forged header. I
can't imagine how many people this guy has sent this crap to using my email
address. And I'm a Christian. It's sooo disgusting!




You mean that "gift" wasn't really from you?

Just kidding, ;-)
Bob

  #8 (permalink)  
Old 04-11-2011, 09:46 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 1
Default

Thuringer is usually made from beef and/or pork. It is a mildly seasoned sausage style lunchmeat- like salami, but is a softer texture as it is not dried or smoked. I'm actually looking around to see if a store in my area carries it, because it's one of my favorites.
 




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