Winemaking (rec.crafts.winemaking) Discussion of the process, recipes, tips, techniques and general exchange of lore on the process, methods and history of wine making. Includes traditional grape wines, sparkling wines & champagnes.

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Old 12-04-2006, 02:43 PM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
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Default stopping fermentation

Transfer your wine into your bottles, put them into a bucket of cold water.
Heat the water up to temp of 85 to 90 degrees, this will kill yeast but will
not destrooy the achol in the wine.......dlt



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Old 12-04-2006, 04:31 PM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
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"Donny Tyler" wrote in message
...
Transfer your wine into your bottles, put them into a bucket of cold
water. Heat the water up to temp of 85 to 90 degrees, this will kill yeast
but will not destrooy the achol in the wine.......dlt

85 to 90 degrees will not kill yeast. I have conducted fermentation at
temperatures up to and over 100 degrees. I will not say it made the best
wine but that was before A/C and it was the best I could do at the time.

Ray


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Old 12-04-2006, 04:38 PM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
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On 4/12/2006 9:43 AM, Donny Tyler wrote:
Transfer your wine into your bottles, put them into a bucket of cold water.
Heat the water up to temp of 85 to 90 degrees, this will kill yeast but will
not destrooy the achol in the wine.......dlt


I do not believe that this method will work as intended. I have had
ferments run into and above that temperature (F) and continue strongly.


Cheers,
Ken Taborek
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Old 12-04-2006, 07:45 PM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
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" I will not say it made the best
wine but that was before A/C and it was the best I could do at the
time. "

Boy, and I thought I was old.

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Old 13-04-2006, 01:02 AM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
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Default stopping fermentation


"Donny Tyler" wrote in message
...
Transfer your wine into your bottles, put them into a bucket of cold

water.
Heat the water up to temp of 85 to 90 degrees, this will kill yeast but

will
not destroy the achol in the wine.......dlt


Perhaps Donny is referring to 85 to 90 degrees C. That would be equivalent
to 185 to 194 F. These temperatures will indeed kill yeast but they may
have an adverse effect on wine quality.
Lum
Del Mar, California, USA





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Old 13-04-2006, 01:08 PM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
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I have been reading about and old method of sterilizing that seems to
be being revisited. The wine is heated to 54 C +/-0.2 C and bottled,
cased and stored with no pre cooling. The temperature is very low but
the long lag time in cooling is used for sterilization. It's in Bird's
book- Winery Technology. His feeling is that the temperature control
must be tight and that it's useful for generic wines in that it can
have a premature aging effect on the wine, possibly making it drinkable
sooner. He is a chemist and master of wine so it's not exactly a 'left
field' theory.

Joe

Joe

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Old 13-04-2006, 03:28 PM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
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Yep, I could tell you stories about how introduction of AC changed our
ability to ferment here in the US south and how it even changed our fishing
laws! ;o)

Ray

"miker" wrote in message
oups.com...
" I will not say it made the best
wine but that was before A/C and it was the best I could do at the
time. "

Boy, and I thought I was old.



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Old 13-04-2006, 06:12 PM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
pp pp is offline
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Joe Sallustio wrote:
I have been reading about and old method of sterilizing that seems to
be being revisited. The wine is heated to 54 C +/-0.2 C and bottled,
cased and stored with no pre cooling. The temperature is very low but
the long lag time in cooling is used for sterilization. It's in Bird's
book- Winery Technology. His feeling is that the temperature control
must be tight and that it's useful for generic wines in that it can
have a premature aging effect on the wine, possibly making it drinkable
sooner. He is a chemist and master of wine so it's not exactly a 'left
field' theory.

Joe

Joe


You'd get a pretty big headspace with that method as the wine cools
down. I'd be worried about oxidation.

Pp

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Old 13-04-2006, 10:16 PM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
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He mentioned that, I assume they overfill when hot. I was think of
heating water up to 54 C and bottling it to see what it does. It might
aslo create a bit of suction when the liquid shrinks. It's and easy
thing to try, I'll post results. I know water and wine are going to
behave differently, but it's a starting point.

Joe

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Old 19-04-2006, 02:09 PM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
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Chill the wine, and add sulfur. Thats how we do it at the winery. Add a
heap of sulfur and chill to below zero, and filter if at all possible.
Of course be careful if adding sulfur to reds, as it can bleach colour.



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Old 19-04-2006, 09:01 PM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
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Default stopping fermentation

Love your understated humor Lum.. 'may' lolol
Gene

Lum Eisenman wrote:
"Donny Tyler" wrote in message
...

Transfer your wine into your bottles, put them into a bucket of cold


water.

Heat the water up to temp of 85 to 90 degrees, this will kill yeast but


will

not destroy the achol in the wine.......dlt



Perhaps Donny is referring to 85 to 90 degrees C. That would be equivalent
to 185 to 194 F. These temperatures will indeed kill yeast but they may
have an adverse effect on wine quality.
Lum
Del Mar, California, USA



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Old 19-04-2006, 09:11 PM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
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pp wrote:

Joe Sallustio wrote:

I have been reading about and old method of sterilizing that seems to
be being revisited. The wine is heated to 54 C +/-0.2 C and bottled,
cased and stored with no pre cooling. The temperature is very low but
the long lag time in cooling is used for sterilization. It's in Bird's
book- Winery Technology. His feeling is that the temperature control
must be tight and that it's useful for generic wines in that it can
have a premature aging effect on the wine, possibly making it drinkable
sooner. He is a chemist and master of wine so it's not exactly a 'left
field' theory.

Joe

Joe



You'd get a pretty big headspace with that method as the wine cools
down. I'd be worried about oxidation.

Pp

Good point PP.
The time between heating and bottling seems enug to oxidize
significantly at these temperatures.. seems better to play safe and to
do all the heating and transfer under a positive flow argon cap.

Gene
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Old 19-04-2006, 09:42 PM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
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Default stopping fermentation

Clare - Clarify what you mean by "sulfur". How much is a heap?
Bill Frazier
Olathe, Kansas USA

wrote in message
oups.com...
Chill the wine, and add sulfur. Thats how we do it at the winery. Add a
heap of sulfur and chill to below zero, and filter if at all possible.
Of course be careful if adding sulfur to reds, as it can bleach colour.





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