Winemaking (rec.crafts.winemaking) Discussion of the process, recipes, tips, techniques and general exchange of lore on the process, methods and history of wine making. Includes traditional grape wines, sparkling wines & champagnes.

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Old 14-02-2005, 04:27 AM
Dick Adams
 
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Default Yeast with a low alcohol tolerance

I'm looking for a yeast that will completely die between 10%
and 12% abv. I would prefer it to be agressive rather than
slow - so it ferments quickly and dies from alcoholism..

Any suggestions?

Dick

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Old 14-02-2005, 07:06 AM
Tom S
 
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"Dick Adams" wrote in message
...
I'm looking for a yeast that will completely die between 10%
and 12% abv. I would prefer it to be agressive rather than
slow - so it ferments quickly and dies from alcoholism..

Any suggestions?


You're seeking a schizophrenic yeast that may not exist.

Vigorous strains (e.g. Prise de Mousse) tend to ferment everything in sight,
whereas slow fermenting strains (e.g. Epernay II) are the ones that are
easiest to stop.

Better make up your mind.

Tom S


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Old 14-02-2005, 03:02 PM
Ken Vale
 
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Dick Adams wrote:
I'm looking for a yeast that will completely die between 10%
and 12% abv. I would prefer it to be agressive rather than
slow - so it ferments quickly and dies from alcoholism..

Any suggestions?

Dick


It is easier to control the sugar than it is to control the yeast, if
there is only enough sugar to reach 10% abv no yeast in the world can
ferment it past that point.
Ken
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Old 14-02-2005, 03:47 PM
Ray Calvert
 
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"Dick Adams" wrote in message
...
I'm looking for a yeast that will completely die between 10%
and 12% abv. I would prefer it to be agressive rather than
slow - so it ferments quickly and dies from alcoholism..

Any suggestions?

Dick


I agree with the comments above. Even with a "homogeneous" yeast like those
you buy, there are billions or maybe trillions of yeast cells in the bucket
and certainly more than that in the must after it goes through a few
replications. No mater how hard the yeast company tries, they are not all
identical. Like any organism, they mutate and they have personal
differences. You cannot guarantee that they will all die off in a certain
range. You can control the sugar so they run out of food at a certain
alcohol level. Then give them enough time to settle out so you can
eliminate most of them through racking. Then you can filter to remove the
rest or treat with sorbate to prevent the few left from reproducing and
causing a problem and you can sweeten to what ever level you want.

Ray




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Old 14-02-2005, 05:37 PM
de sik
 
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There is a yeast that does just that. Kitzinger Liebfraumilch ferments up to
about 11 %. Normally some sugar remains. Delicious wines, especially used
for my applewine. Starts slow, ferments rather quickly until it reaches 10 %
and slows down until it finally stops.
Where to buy? Rocky Top Homebrew Supplies, Olympia, Washington.

Give it a go.

Ed

"Dick Adams" schreef in bericht
...
I'm looking for a yeast that will completely die between 10%
and 12% abv. I would prefer it to be agressive rather than
slow - so it ferments quickly and dies from alcoholism..

Any suggestions?

Dick



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Old 15-02-2005, 02:56 AM
Dick Adams
 
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Default

Ken Vale wrote:
Dick Adams wrote:


I'm looking for a yeast that will completely die between 10%
and 12% abv. I would prefer it to be agressive rather than
slow - so it ferments quickly and dies from alcoholism..

Any suggestions?


It is easier to control the sugar than it is to control the
yeast, if there is only enough sugar to reach 10% abv no
yeast in the world can ferment it past that point.


I always appreciate common sense answers. My problem is that
when I let a Maple Syrup Wine/Mead ferment out, it acquires a
fuesal taste. So I'd like it to ferment out leaving an SG of
around 1.02. The solution so far has been crushed Campden
tablets per gallon. They aren't that easy to crush.

Dick
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Old 15-02-2005, 03:27 PM
Ray Calvert
 
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"Dick Adams" wrote in message
...
Ken Vale wrote:
Dick Adams wrote:


I'm looking for a yeast that will completely die between 10%
and 12% abv. I would prefer it to be agressive rather than
slow - so it ferments quickly and dies from alcoholism..

Any suggestions?


It is easier to control the sugar than it is to control the
yeast, if there is only enough sugar to reach 10% abv no
yeast in the world can ferment it past that point.


I always appreciate common sense answers. My problem is that
when I let a Maple Syrup Wine/Mead ferment out, it acquires a
fuesal taste. So I'd like it to ferment out leaving an SG of
around 1.02. The solution so far has been crushed Campden
tablets per gallon. They aren't that easy to crush.

Dick


I am not talking from experience here but when it gets down to the SG you
want you might try putting it in a refrigerator or freezer to stop the
fermentation. This will not kill it so if you bring it out and warm it up
again it will likely start up again. If you can leave it in the cold until
it starts to clear. Then rack it off the sediment. This will leave most of
the yeast behind. You might be able to either sterile filter it (not a
simple filter, a sterile filter) or treat it with sorbate and let it finish
clearing. I would force the clearing with fining as fast as possible.

Just some suggestions. Once again, not from experience so take them for
what they are.

Ray


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Old 15-02-2005, 05:36 PM
alien
 
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Default

Ray Calvert wrote:
"Dick Adams" wrote in message
...

Ken Vale wrote:

Dick Adams wrote:


I'm looking for a yeast that will completely die between 10%
and 12% abv. I would prefer it to be agressive rather than
slow - so it ferments quickly and dies from alcoholism..

Any suggestions?


It is easier to control the sugar than it is to control the
yeast, if there is only enough sugar to reach 10% abv no
yeast in the world can ferment it past that point.


I always appreciate common sense answers. My problem is that
when I let a Maple Syrup Wine/Mead ferment out, it acquires a
fuesal taste. So I'd like it to ferment out leaving an SG of
around 1.02. The solution so far has been crushed Campden
tablets per gallon. They aren't that easy to crush.

Dick



I am not talking from experience here but when it gets down to the SG you
want you might try putting it in a refrigerator or freezer to stop the
fermentation. This will not kill it so if you bring it out and warm it up
again it will likely start up again. If you can leave it in the cold until
it starts to clear. Then rack it off the sediment. This will leave most of
the yeast behind. You might be able to either sterile filter it (not a
simple filter, a sterile filter) or treat it with sorbate and let it finish
clearing. I would force the clearing with fining as fast as possible.

Just some suggestions. Once again, not from experience so take them for
what they are.

Ray


I use the sugar I need to get to the abv I want, ferment dry, bulk age
and rack etc. Then bottle dry. When I drink it, I add sugar if needed.
Saves a lot of hassle.
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Old 15-02-2005, 08:02 PM
Ken Vale
 
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Dick Adams wrote:
Ken Vale wrote:

Dick Adams wrote:



I'm looking for a yeast that will completely die between 10%
and 12% abv. I would prefer it to be agressive rather than
slow - so it ferments quickly and dies from alcoholism..

Any suggestions?



It is easier to control the sugar than it is to control the
yeast, if there is only enough sugar to reach 10% abv no
yeast in the world can ferment it past that point.



I always appreciate common sense answers. My problem is that
when I let a Maple Syrup Wine/Mead ferment out, it acquires a
fuesal taste. So I'd like it to ferment out leaving an SG of
around 1.02. The solution so far has been crushed Campden
tablets per gallon. They aren't that easy to crush.

Dick


Okay I'm betting (but only because I'm in no way certain) that the
fuesal taste has to do the yeast you are using and how it ferments the
remaining sugars. Likely the remaining sugars are much harder to ferment
and thus produce the fuesal taste, a different yeast may result in a
different taste. I know someone who fermented out some maple syrup with
EC-1118 and had no fuesal tastes. I can understand how annoying the
campden tablets would be to crush, have you considered a pill crusher
(which should be available from your local drugstore) or buying powdered
metabisulphate (though this requires an accurate scale capable of
measuring in grams).
Ken


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Old 15-02-2005, 11:02 PM
Ray Calvert
 
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I use the sugar I need to get to the abv I want, ferment dry, bulk age and
rack etc. Then bottle dry. When I drink it, I add sugar if needed. Saves a
lot of hassle.


I must admit that I do that also and in general it works very well. But I
have noted that if I pop the cork, sweeten, then put a tasters cork back in
it and let it set for an hour or over night in the fridge, it is better than
if I just sweeten when I drink it. Just an observation and my own opinion.

Ray


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Old 16-02-2005, 01:32 PM
alien
 
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Ray Calvert wrote:

I use the sugar I need to get to the abv I want, ferment dry, bulk age and
rack etc. Then bottle dry. When I drink it, I add sugar if needed. Saves a
lot of hassle.



I must admit that I do that also and in general it works very well. But I
have noted that if I pop the cork, sweeten, then put a tasters cork back in
it and let it set for an hour or over night in the fridge, it is better than
if I just sweeten when I drink it. Just an observation and my own opinion.

Ray


I'll give that a go. One question, what is a tasters cork?
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Old 16-02-2005, 01:32 PM
alien
 
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Default

Ray Calvert wrote:

I use the sugar I need to get to the abv I want, ferment dry, bulk age and
rack etc. Then bottle dry. When I drink it, I add sugar if needed. Saves a
lot of hassle.



I must admit that I do that also and in general it works very well. But I
have noted that if I pop the cork, sweeten, then put a tasters cork back in
it and let it set for an hour or over night in the fridge, it is better than
if I just sweeten when I drink it. Just an observation and my own opinion.

Ray


I'll give that a go. One question, what is a tasters cork?
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Old 16-02-2005, 02:37 PM
Don S
 
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The solution so far has been crushed Campden
tablets per gallon. They aren't that easy to crush.


Use the powder form instead of the tablets. I also don't
think we fully understand what your trying to do - leave
a residual sweetness without sorbate or what. Sorbate would
be the answer but I noticed when I did a Niagara Mist
Peach Chardonnay, which was the first time I used sorbate,
that I didn't like something in the taste. I'm guessing
it was the sorbate.

Don
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Old 16-02-2005, 03:09 PM
Ray Calvert
 
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There are probably other names for them. They are short corks, maybe 1/2 to
3/4 inch with a plastic cap on one end. After you open a bottle you can use
them to push back in by hand and open by hand easily without a cork screw.
Wine tasting rooms often use them. They are not very good for long term use
but for a short period up to maybe a few months they work fine. I buy a few
dozen every now and then and use them regularly. They can be reused if you
are only using them for a few days at a time.

Ray

"alien" wrote in message
...
Ray Calvert wrote:

I use the sugar I need to get to the abv I want, ferment dry, bulk age
and rack etc. Then bottle dry. When I drink it, I add sugar if needed.
Saves a lot of hassle.



I must admit that I do that also and in general it works very well. But
I have noted that if I pop the cork, sweeten, then put a tasters cork
back in it and let it set for an hour or over night in the fridge, it is
better than if I just sweeten when I drink it. Just an observation and
my own opinion.

Ray


I'll give that a go. One question, what is a tasters cork?





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