Winemaking (rec.crafts.winemaking) Discussion of the process, recipes, tips, techniques and general exchange of lore on the process, methods and history of wine making. Includes traditional grape wines, sparkling wines & champagnes.

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Old 01-12-2004, 01:22 PM
Sarge
 
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Default Vineyard Sprays of Sulfur and copper effect on wine

I encountered an H2S problem when I made wine from chardonnay grapes that
were sprayed with sulfur. The sulfur residue could be seen on the grapes.
Of course the H2S may have been caused by some other reason and the problem
was resolved by aeration.

I wonder how a spray program of sulfur and copper could affect winemaking.
Does residual amounts of sulfur on grapes contribute to free SO2 and H2S in
wine?
What effects does residual amounts of copper have on wine?
thanks
Sarge





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Old 02-12-2004, 05:19 PM
Tim McNally
 
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What makes you think you saw on the grapes was spray?
Tim
I encountered an H2S problem when I made wine from chardonnay grapes that
were sprayed with sulfur. The sulfur residue could be seen on the grapes.
Of course the H2S may have been caused by some other reason and the problem
was resolved by aeration.

I wonder how a spray program of sulfur and copper could affect winemaking.
Does residual amounts of sulfur on grapes contribute to free SO2 and H2S in
wine?
What effects does residual amounts of copper have on wine?
thanks
Sarge

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Old 03-12-2004, 03:17 AM
Sarge
 
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Default

The berries had what looked like a milky white stain on them. Unless they
used milk for spray ha-ha..

"Tim McNally" wrote in message
om...
What makes you think you saw on the grapes was spray?
Tim
I encountered an H2S problem when I made wine from chardonnay grapes

that
were sprayed with sulfur. The sulfur residue could be seen on the

grapes.
Of course the H2S may have been caused by some other reason and the

problem
was resolved by aeration.

I wonder how a spray program of sulfur and copper could affect

winemaking.
Does residual amounts of sulfur on grapes contribute to free SO2 and H2S

in
wine?
What effects does residual amounts of copper have on wine?
thanks
Sarge



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Old 04-12-2004, 06:07 PM
J F
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Sarge" wrote in message
news
I encountered an H2S problem when I made wine from chardonnay grapes that
were sprayed with sulfur. The sulfur residue could be seen on the grapes.
Of course the H2S may have been caused by some other reason and the

problem
was resolved by aeration.

I wonder how a spray program of sulfur and copper could affect winemaking.
Does residual amounts of sulfur on grapes contribute to free SO2 and H2S

in
wine?

It can contribute to H2S in your wine but most vineyards stop spraying
sulphur weeks before harvest for this reason.


  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 05-12-2004, 02:33 AM
Sarge
 
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Default


"J F" wrote in message
...

"Sarge" wrote in message
news
I encountered an H2S problem when I made wine from chardonnay grapes

that
were sprayed with sulfur. The sulfur residue could be seen on the

grapes.
Of course the H2S may have been caused by some other reason and the

problem
was resolved by aeration.

I wonder how a spray program of sulfur and copper could affect

winemaking.
Does residual amounts of sulfur on grapes contribute to free SO2 and H2S

in
wine?

It can contribute to H2S in your wine but most vineyards stop spraying
sulphur weeks before harvest for this reason.


In a bad season they may have to spray closer to harvest. Also what if it
doesn't rain after the last spray, would some sulfur still be on the grapes
at harvest?




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Old 05-12-2004, 02:33 AM
Sarge
 
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Default


"J F" wrote in message
...

"Sarge" wrote in message
news
I encountered an H2S problem when I made wine from chardonnay grapes

that
were sprayed with sulfur. The sulfur residue could be seen on the

grapes.
Of course the H2S may have been caused by some other reason and the

problem
was resolved by aeration.

I wonder how a spray program of sulfur and copper could affect

winemaking.
Does residual amounts of sulfur on grapes contribute to free SO2 and H2S

in
wine?

It can contribute to H2S in your wine but most vineyards stop spraying
sulphur weeks before harvest for this reason.


In a bad season they may have to spray closer to harvest. Also what if it
doesn't rain after the last spray, would some sulfur still be on the grapes
at harvest?


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Old 05-12-2004, 02:33 AM
Sarge
 
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Default


"J F" wrote in message
...

"Sarge" wrote in message
news
I encountered an H2S problem when I made wine from chardonnay grapes

that
were sprayed with sulfur. The sulfur residue could be seen on the

grapes.
Of course the H2S may have been caused by some other reason and the

problem
was resolved by aeration.

I wonder how a spray program of sulfur and copper could affect

winemaking.
Does residual amounts of sulfur on grapes contribute to free SO2 and H2S

in
wine?

It can contribute to H2S in your wine but most vineyards stop spraying
sulphur weeks before harvest for this reason.


In a bad season they may have to spray closer to harvest. Also what if it
doesn't rain after the last spray, would some sulfur still be on the grapes
at harvest?


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Old 05-12-2004, 02:47 AM
J F
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Sarge" wrote in message
...

"J F" wrote in message
...

"Sarge" wrote in message
news
I encountered an H2S problem when I made wine from chardonnay grapes

that
were sprayed with sulfur. The sulfur residue could be seen on the

grapes.
Of course the H2S may have been caused by some other reason and the

problem
was resolved by aeration.

I wonder how a spray program of sulfur and copper could affect

winemaking.
Does residual amounts of sulfur on grapes contribute to free SO2 and

H2S
in
wine?

It can contribute to H2S in your wine but most vineyards stop spraying
sulphur weeks before harvest for this reason.


In a bad season they may have to spray closer to harvest. Also what if it
doesn't rain after the last spray, would some sulfur still be on the

grapes
at harvest?

It's possible the sulphur levels could be high enough to cause troubles in
such a situtation. In such cases it's advisable to watch your nitrogen
levels and even be a bit heavy handed with nutrients.
If you get your grapes unpressed and whole cluster, gently washing them with
clean water can removed the residue. You'll need to let them drip dry before
pressing.


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Old 05-12-2004, 06:15 PM
Ken Anderson
 
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Default

The Mancozeb I use can't be applied 63 days before harvest. Yet when I was
picking my grapes, I could still see the yellow residue on the bottom of the
grapes. It was where the original drop formed and dried. Seemed to have just
stayed stuck there. So does the 63 day rule indicate that, although the
fungicide still appears to be present, it's actually now inert and harmless?
Or does it mean our government bureaucracy may have yet bungled again? I
suspect the latter, but have also read that Mancozeb has low toxicity.
Hopefully they've got THAT right.
Ken


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Old 05-12-2004, 06:15 PM
Ken Anderson
 
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The Mancozeb I use can't be applied 63 days before harvest. Yet when I was
picking my grapes, I could still see the yellow residue on the bottom of the
grapes. It was where the original drop formed and dried. Seemed to have just
stayed stuck there. So does the 63 day rule indicate that, although the
fungicide still appears to be present, it's actually now inert and harmless?
Or does it mean our government bureaucracy may have yet bungled again? I
suspect the latter, but have also read that Mancozeb has low toxicity.
Hopefully they've got THAT right.
Ken




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Old 05-12-2004, 08:16 PM
gwoolam
 
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Default

Mancozeb probably came in the form of a wettable powder or a flowable (a
prewetted powder) these formulations usually use a talc or a clay as a
carrier. The chemical its self is boken down in time by sunlight and heat.
What you are seeing is most likely the carrier residue.
"Ken Anderson" wrote in message
...
The Mancozeb I use can't be applied 63 days before harvest. Yet when I
was
picking my grapes, I could still see the yellow residue on the bottom of
the
grapes. It was where the original drop formed and dried. Seemed to have
just
stayed stuck there. So does the 63 day rule indicate that, although the
fungicide still appears to be present, it's actually now inert and
harmless?
Or does it mean our government bureaucracy may have yet bungled again? I
suspect the latter, but have also read that Mancozeb has low toxicity.
Hopefully they've got THAT right.
Ken




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Old 05-12-2004, 08:16 PM
gwoolam
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Mancozeb probably came in the form of a wettable powder or a flowable (a
prewetted powder) these formulations usually use a talc or a clay as a
carrier. The chemical its self is boken down in time by sunlight and heat.
What you are seeing is most likely the carrier residue.
"Ken Anderson" wrote in message
...
The Mancozeb I use can't be applied 63 days before harvest. Yet when I
was
picking my grapes, I could still see the yellow residue on the bottom of
the
grapes. It was where the original drop formed and dried. Seemed to have
just
stayed stuck there. So does the 63 day rule indicate that, although the
fungicide still appears to be present, it's actually now inert and
harmless?
Or does it mean our government bureaucracy may have yet bungled again? I
suspect the latter, but have also read that Mancozeb has low toxicity.
Hopefully they've got THAT right.
Ken




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Old 13-12-2004, 01:40 PM
Sarge
 
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Default

This might explain it. Does kumulus (wp sulfur) also have similar sticker
spreader?
thanks
Sarge

"gwoolam" wrote in message
om...
Mancozeb probably came in the form of a wettable powder or a flowable (a
prewetted powder) these formulations usually use a talc or a clay as a
carrier. The chemical its self is boken down in time by sunlight and

heat.
What you are seeing is most likely the carrier residue.
"Ken Anderson" wrote in message
...
The Mancozeb I use can't be applied 63 days before harvest. Yet when I
was
picking my grapes, I could still see the yellow residue on the bottom of
the
grapes. It was where the original drop formed and dried. Seemed to

have
just
stayed stuck there. So does the 63 day rule indicate that, although the
fungicide still appears to be present, it's actually now inert and
harmless?
Or does it mean our government bureaucracy may have yet bungled again?

I
suspect the latter, but have also read that Mancozeb has low toxicity.
Hopefully they've got THAT right.
Ken






  #14 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 13-12-2004, 01:40 PM
Sarge
 
Posts: n/a
Default

This might explain it. Does kumulus (wp sulfur) also have similar sticker
spreader?
thanks
Sarge

"gwoolam" wrote in message
om...
Mancozeb probably came in the form of a wettable powder or a flowable (a
prewetted powder) these formulations usually use a talc or a clay as a
carrier. The chemical its self is boken down in time by sunlight and

heat.
What you are seeing is most likely the carrier residue.
"Ken Anderson" wrote in message
...
The Mancozeb I use can't be applied 63 days before harvest. Yet when I
was
picking my grapes, I could still see the yellow residue on the bottom of
the
grapes. It was where the original drop formed and dried. Seemed to

have
just
stayed stuck there. So does the 63 day rule indicate that, although the
fungicide still appears to be present, it's actually now inert and
harmless?
Or does it mean our government bureaucracy may have yet bungled again?

I
suspect the latter, but have also read that Mancozeb has low toxicity.
Hopefully they've got THAT right.
Ken








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