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Old 15-04-2004, 07:00 PM
Dan Emerson
 
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Default Cool Kit Ferment

I am trying an experiment by comparing two Pinot Gris kits side by
side. One in a Bolero Kit and the other is a Cellar Classic, both
from Spagnols. I started them a week apart and have treated them the
same. (I think I made a small mistake in the Cellar Classic kit. I
didn't add enough water in the primary and I had to top up with quite
a bit of wine when transferred to the secondary. Maybe that will be
part of the experiment too!)

Anyway, each was fermented in pretty cool temperatures, around 13 - 15
degrees (55 - 60). The ferment was slow as expected, but now, the
sugar ferment is over, SG ~ 0.95 or so. In each of them, I am still
getting steady bubbles like it is under MLF. I thought that these kit
juices were already balanced and there shouldn't be much malic acid
present.

Is this MLF or maybe just excess CO2 escaping? According to my long
ago chemistry education, I think CO2 is more soluble at lower
temperatures, so my wine might be saturated with CO2, and thus the
extended bubbles.

Any thoughts, comments?

Dan

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Old 15-04-2004, 10:06 PM
Ed Marks
 
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Default Cool Kit Ferment

Dan,

It's most likely CO2 - you're right that it's more soluble in wine at lower
temperatures. Is the wine still in a cool place or have you put it in a
warmer temperature? If it's in a warmer area you'll definitely see CO2
bubbles coming out of solution. As long as you followed the rest of the kit
instructions, along with the appropriate sulfite additions, it's unlikely
that you'll get a MLF.

Ed

"Dan Emerson" wrote in message
om...
I am trying an experiment by comparing two Pinot Gris kits side by
side. One in a Bolero Kit and the other is a Cellar Classic, both
from Spagnols. I started them a week apart and have treated them the
same. (I think I made a small mistake in the Cellar Classic kit. I
didn't add enough water in the primary and I had to top up with quite
a bit of wine when transferred to the secondary. Maybe that will be
part of the experiment too!)

Anyway, each was fermented in pretty cool temperatures, around 13 - 15
degrees (55 - 60). The ferment was slow as expected, but now, the
sugar ferment is over, SG ~ 0.95 or so. In each of them, I am still
getting steady bubbles like it is under MLF. I thought that these kit
juices were already balanced and there shouldn't be much malic acid
present.

Is this MLF or maybe just excess CO2 escaping? According to my long
ago chemistry education, I think CO2 is more soluble at lower
temperatures, so my wine might be saturated with CO2, and thus the
extended bubbles.

Any thoughts, comments?

Dan



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Old 16-04-2004, 12:57 AM
pp
 
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Default Cool Kit Ferment

Yes, there is CO2 in the wine at this stage, more at lower
temperature. However, if you're seeing a steady stream of bubbles,
it's more likely an ongoing fermentation. Are you sure your
fermentation is over? I haven't done Spagnol's Pinot Gris, but the 2
Spagnol's wine kits I've done (Cru select Viognier and Aus Chardonnay)
both were just under 0.990 when finished, so you might still have more
than 1% residual sugar in the wine now. Do a Clinitest check for
residual sugar to make sure.

MLF is extremely unlikely in kits, as well as not recommended. The
juice is supposed to be balanced, but with the opposite result than
you mentioned - it has much bigger ratio of malic acid vs tartaric
than grapes, I think the reason is to prevent tartrate deposits in the
bottle. Doing a ML on a kit wine would thus result in a flabby wine.

Pp

(Dan Emerson) wrote in message . com...
I am trying an experiment by comparing two Pinot Gris kits side by
side. One in a Bolero Kit and the other is a Cellar Classic, both
from Spagnols. I started them a week apart and have treated them the
same. (I think I made a small mistake in the Cellar Classic kit. I
didn't add enough water in the primary and I had to top up with quite
a bit of wine when transferred to the secondary. Maybe that will be
part of the experiment too!)

Anyway, each was fermented in pretty cool temperatures, around 13 - 15
degrees (55 - 60). The ferment was slow as expected, but now, the
sugar ferment is over, SG ~ 0.95 or so. In each of them, I am still
getting steady bubbles like it is under MLF. I thought that these kit
juices were already balanced and there shouldn't be much malic acid
present.

Is this MLF or maybe just excess CO2 escaping? According to my long
ago chemistry education, I think CO2 is more soluble at lower
temperatures, so my wine might be saturated with CO2, and thus the
extended bubbles.

Any thoughts, comments?

Dan

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Old 16-04-2004, 02:21 PM
Alfonse
 
Posts: n/a
Default Cool Kit Ferment

Hello Dan,
I have the same problem when I ferment in my basement in the winter months.
The temp is around 64 degrees and results in a lot of c02 in the wine. Needs
a lot of stirring to release the gas (or a Fizz-x gizmo). Or you can store
the wine for 1-2 months in a warmer place and the co2 should dissipate on
its own without risking oxidation from stirring the wine. The bubble you see
must be from fermentation unless you bumped or moved the carboy before
looking. This could result in escaping co2 bubbles but should subside
quickly. Hope this helps.
Al

"Dan Emerson" wrote in message
om...
I am trying an experiment by comparing two Pinot Gris kits side by
side. One in a Bolero Kit and the other is a Cellar Classic, both
from Spagnols. I started them a week apart and have treated them the
same. (I think I made a small mistake in the Cellar Classic kit. I
didn't add enough water in the primary and I had to top up with quite
a bit of wine when transferred to the secondary. Maybe that will be
part of the experiment too!)

Anyway, each was fermented in pretty cool temperatures, around 13 - 15
degrees (55 - 60). The ferment was slow as expected, but now, the
sugar ferment is over, SG ~ 0.95 or so. In each of them, I am still
getting steady bubbles like it is under MLF. I thought that these kit
juices were already balanced and there shouldn't be much malic acid
present.

Is this MLF or maybe just excess CO2 escaping? According to my long
ago chemistry education, I think CO2 is more soluble at lower
temperatures, so my wine might be saturated with CO2, and thus the
extended bubbles.

Any thoughts, comments?

Dan





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