Winemaking (rec.crafts.winemaking) Discussion of the process, recipes, tips, techniques and general exchange of lore on the process, methods and history of wine making. Includes traditional grape wines, sparkling wines & champagnes.

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Old 25-09-2009, 05:30 PM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
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Default When & how to use Campden tablets. New to wine making.

Hi all,
I am new to wine making and follow recipe's online and from books.
I started 6 weeks ago and have started , Damson, Blackberry, Apple,Crap
Apple
& Elderberry all in quantities of 1 gallon.

I am a bit confused when to use Campden tablets as some recipe's add them
from start,
others at first racking, some on last racking and some don't mention them at
all.
Can you guide me through when to use them please ?
TIA



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Old 25-09-2009, 06:42 PM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
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Default When & how to use Campden tablets. New to wine making.

Mike wrote:
Hi all,
I am new to wine making and follow recipe's online and from books.
I started 6 weeks ago and have started , Damson, Blackberry, Apple,Crap
Apple
& Elderberry all in quantities of 1 gallon.

I am a bit confused when to use Campden tablets as some recipe's add them
from start,
others at first racking, some on last racking and some don't mention them at
all.
Can you guide me through when to use them please ?
TIA



http://winemaking.jackkeller.net/adding.asp
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Old 25-09-2009, 08:50 PM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
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Default When & how to use Campden tablets. New to wine making.

On Sep 25, 1:42*pm, BobF wrote:
Mike wrote:

Mike,

Just wanted to add to what Jack Keller says. Campen tablets are
enough sulfites to make SO2 equal to 50 ppm for one gallon of wine.
SO2 does NOT kill organisms but puts them into a state of inactivity.
Contrary to some of the info floating around here by self proclaimed
people of credibility, even the engineered yeast can go dormant if
enough SO2 is added to a must. So the trick is to make all the
bacteria in the must dormant without affecting the yeast you
pitched. 50ppm of SO2 is that number that most winemakers use. After
fermentation, the SO2 will be gone from the must because it is a gas
and dissapates from the activity during the ferment. After
fermentation, the wine will be full of CO2 ( fizzy). The CO2 will
protect the wine as long as you keep the wine topped up in th
container you keep it in. You will need to de-gas the wine eventually
by stirring it or some other way. Contrary to what Jack Keller says,
oxygen is needed at the start of fermentation and also is introduced
gradually and controlled ( racking) after fermentation to age the
wine. After ferment you could wait to add SO2 because if you keep the
wine topped up, it is saturated in CO2 so there is no panic to add
it.



I Hi all,
I am new to wine making and follow recipe's online and from books.
I started 6 weeks ago and have started , Damson, Blackberry, Apple,Crap
Apple
& Elderberry all in *quantities of 1 gallon.


I am a bit confused when to use Campden tablets as some recipe's add them
from start,
others at first racking, some on last racking and some don't mention them at
all.
Can you guide me through when to use them please ?
TIA


http://winemaking.jackkeller.net/adding.asp


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Old 25-09-2009, 10:19 PM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
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Default When & how to use Campden tablets. New to wine making.

Doug Miller wrote:
In article , wrote:

[...] After fermentation, the wine will be full of CO2 ( fizzy). The CO2 will
protect the wine as long as you keep the wine topped up in th
container you keep it in.[...] After ferment you could wait to add SO2 because if you keep the
wine topped up, it is saturated in CO2 so there is no panic to add it.


Not sure I understand/agree with the above. The purpose of having SO2 in the
wine is to protect the wine from oxidation; this works because SO2 is readily
oxidized to SO3, and thus any oxygen present will react with the SO2 instead
of with the wine. This does *not* happen with CO2, though. CO2 is already as
oxidized as it's going to get, so it's difficult to see how the presence of
CO2 confers any protection against oxidation or anything else.


The only protection I can think of is at the surface - perhaps a
blanketing effect as co2 is heavier than atmosphere.

OTOH, co2 will do nothing to protect the wine from oxygen once the
oxygen gets into the wine. That's what the so2 is for.


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Old 25-09-2009, 11:30 PM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
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Default When & how to use Campden tablets. New to wine making.

In article , BobF wrote:
Doug Miller wrote:
In article

,
wrote:

[...] After fermentation, the wine will be full of CO2 ( fizzy). The CO2

will
protect the wine as long as you keep the wine topped up in th
container you keep it in.[...] After ferment you could wait to add SO2

because if you keep the
wine topped up, it is saturated in CO2 so there is no panic to add it.


Not sure I understand/agree with the above. The purpose of having SO2 in the
wine is to protect the wine from oxidation; this works because SO2 is readily


oxidized to SO3, and thus any oxygen present will react with the SO2 instead
of with the wine. This does *not* happen with CO2, though. CO2 is already as
oxidized as it's going to get, so it's difficult to see how the presence of
CO2 confers any protection against oxidation or anything else.


The only protection I can think of is at the surface - perhaps a
blanketing effect as co2 is heavier than atmosphere.

OTOH, co2 will do nothing to protect the wine from oxygen once the
oxygen gets into the wine. That's what the so2 is for.


Exactly so. There will be a layer of CO2 at the top of the vessel during
primary fermentation, and it will remain there until the vessel is disturbed
for racking. The same thing happens during secondary fermentation; again, the
layer of CO2 remains until the wine is racked. After that, though, the head
space in the vessel is filled with air, not CO2. Some CO2 will come out of
solution, but not much, not nearly enough to displace all the air. Dissolved
CO2 confers no protection against oxidation.
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Old 26-09-2009, 02:18 PM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
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Default When & how to use Campden tablets. New to wine making.

"Dissolved CO2 confers no protection against oxidation. "

You contradicted that In you previous sentences. I'm not saying he
should use CO2 as his way of protecting the wine. All I'm saying is
that there is no panic to sulfite after fermentation is done if he
tops up. If he wants to under go MLF then he should definitely not
sulfite.

On Sep 25, 6:30*pm, (Doug Miller) wrote:
In article , BobF wrote:
Doug Miller wrote:
In article

,
wrote:


[...] After fermentation, the wine will be full of CO2 ( fizzy). The CO2

will
protect the wine as long as you keep the wine topped up in th
container you keep it in.[...] After ferment you could wait to add SO2

because if you keep the
wine topped up, it is saturated in CO2 *so there is no panic to add it.


Not sure I understand/agree with the above. The purpose of having SO2 in the
wine is to protect the wine from oxidation; this works because SO2 is readily


oxidized to SO3, and thus any oxygen present will react with the SO2 instead
of with the wine. This does *not* happen with CO2, though. CO2 is already as
oxidized as it's going to get, so it's difficult to see how the presence of
CO2 confers any protection against oxidation or anything else.


The only protection I can think of is at the surface - perhaps a
blanketing effect as co2 is heavier than atmosphere.


OTOH, co2 will do nothing to protect the wine from oxygen once the
oxygen gets into the wine. *That's what the so2 is for.


Exactly so. There will be a layer of CO2 at the top of the vessel during
primary fermentation, and it will remain there until the vessel is disturbed
for racking. The same thing happens during secondary fermentation; again, the
layer of CO2 remains until the wine is racked. After that, though, the head
space in the vessel is filled with air, not CO2. Some CO2 will come out of
solution, but not much, not nearly enough to displace all the air. Dissolved
CO2 confers no protection against oxidation.


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Old 26-09-2009, 02:44 PM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
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Default When & how to use Campden tablets. New to wine making.

BobF wrote:
Mike wrote:
Hi all,
I am new to wine making and follow recipe's online and from books.
I started 6 weeks ago and have started , Damson, Blackberry,
Apple,Crap Apple
& Elderberry all in quantities of 1 gallon.

I am a bit confused when to use Campden tablets as some recipe's add
them from start,
others at first racking, some on last racking and some don't mention
them at all.
Can you guide me through when to use them please ?
TIA


http://winemaking.jackkeller.net/adding.asp


Here's more in-depth info on SO2. Everything you ever wanted to know
and then some.

http://brsquared.org/wine/Articles/SO2/SO2.htm
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Old 12-03-2014, 03:13 AM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
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Default When & how to use Campden tablets. New to wine making.

On Friday, September 25, 2009 12:30:37 PM UTC-4, Mike wrote:
Hi all,
I am new to wine making and follow recipe's online and from books.
I started 6 weeks ago and have started , Damson, Blackberry, Apple,Crap
Apple
& Elderberry all in quantities of 1 gallon.

I am a bit confused when to use Campden tablets as some recipe's add them
from start,
others at first racking, some on last racking and some don't mention them at
all.
Can you guide me through when to use them please ?
TIA


I started with 12 cans of Welchs 100% frozen grape juice (concord grapes). The book I read said add 4 tablets of Campden pills (I used the potassium version). I added 5 pounds granulated sugar and the crushed/dissolved campden pills to the juice and shook it in the carbouoy until the sugar was dissolved. I started Fleshmens bakers yeast in a small bowl with warm water and sugar. Yeast was foamy and I added it to the carbuoy. It has been two days and it has not started to ferment yet. Did the Campden pills kill the yeast? How do I fix this? I am making 5 gallons.

email me at mank-at-bardstowncable-dot-net

Thanks in advance!


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