Winemaking (rec.crafts.winemaking) Discussion of the process, recipes, tips, techniques and general exchange of lore on the process, methods and history of wine making. Includes traditional grape wines, sparkling wines & champagnes.

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Old 01-12-2006, 05:55 PM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
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Default Acid and sugar levels

I'm one of the new guys here. I'm getting set to make a batch of fruit wine
from raw juice.

I think I know the answer to the sugar question. Is the task to add
enough sugar so the hydrometer level indicates 10-12% potential sugar for
the fermentation stages? If not, then how do I determine how much sugar to
add.

What is the ideal acid level? I read that if the acid is low, add more
and if it is high, add water to dilute. But I can't find what ideal or even
nominal is.

--
Regards,

Casey Wilson
Freelance Writer and Photographer



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Old 02-12-2006, 01:04 AM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
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Default Acid and sugar levels

You need a hydrometer to measure this, for fruit wines to get 10-12%
alcohol in the end, you want to be around 1.075-1.085 on trhe specific
gravity scale.

You can measure acid by titration. Fruit wines are different from grape
wines in terms of acid management in that the acid goes up during the
fermentation, so if you want a dry wine, you'd start with a lower
acidity than for grapes, maybe around 5g/L? Or you can balance the wine
in the end with some sugar. Ben Rotter wrote about this on the
newsgroup - do a search.

The other thing is that for many fruits, straight juice is too acidic
to produce a good wine, so it's typically diluted with water, sometimes
a lot. Jack Keller's and Ben Rotter's sites have info on average acid
values for fruit, so check there - I would think that a pomegranate
would definitely need so dilution.

There is a lot of variables, so although I don't myself like the recipe
approach, if you're just starting up, it'd make sense to follow a
recipe. That will get you into a decent ballpark in terms of the
balance.

Pp

On Dec 1, 9:55 am, "N2310D" wrote:
I'm one of the new guys here. I'm getting set to make a batch of fruit wine
from raw juice.

I think I know the answer to the sugar question. Is the task to add
enough sugar so the hydrometer level indicates 10-12% potential sugar for
the fermentation stages? If not, then how do I determine how much sugar to
add.

What is the ideal acid level? I read that if the acid is low, add more
and if it is high, add water to dilute. But I can't find what ideal or even
nominal is.

--
Regards,

Casey Wilson
Freelance Writer and Photographer


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Old 02-12-2006, 03:22 AM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
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Default Acid and sugar levels

Thanks for the response. The specific gravity approach makes the sugar
answer pretty straight forward.

I'll do some digging to find Rotter's paper on acid. Meanwhile, I'm sure --
like you said -- that I'll have to add water to dilute the acidity. Sounds
logical that I should handle the acidity first since the dilution will
change the specific gravity. At least I'm intuiting that the specific
gravity will change.

I know that as a rank amateur in winemaking, I should heed the experts and
go with someone's recipe. Alas, I'm just not good at recipes. Especially in
the case where the recipe calls for three units of 'concentrated' grape
juice for each unit of undiluted pomegranate juice. Or start with a batch of
boiled barley. Isn't barley used to make beer?

Can I bother you with one more question? Is there any problem with making a
simple syrup by boiling the sugar in water (and then cooling it down, of
course) rather than dumping the dry sugar in the juice and stirring the
daylights out of it?

Merci,

Casey Wilson
Freelance Writer and Photographer




"pp" wrote in message
ups.com...
You need a hydrometer to measure this, for fruit wines to get 10-12%
alcohol in the end, you want to be around 1.075-1.085 on trhe specific
gravity scale.

You can measure acid by titration. Fruit wines are different from grape
wines in terms of acid management in that the acid goes up during the
fermentation, so if you want a dry wine, you'd start with a lower
acidity than for grapes, maybe around 5g/L? Or you can balance the wine
in the end with some sugar. Ben Rotter wrote about this on the
newsgroup - do a search.

The other thing is that for many fruits, straight juice is too acidic
to produce a good wine, so it's typically diluted with water, sometimes
a lot. Jack Keller's and Ben Rotter's sites have info on average acid
values for fruit, so check there - I would think that a pomegranate
would definitely need so dilution.

There is a lot of variables, so although I don't myself like the recipe
approach, if you're just starting up, it'd make sense to follow a
recipe. That will get you into a decent ballpark in terms of the
balance.

Pp

On Dec 1, 9:55 am, "N2310D" wrote:
I'm one of the new guys here. I'm getting set to make a batch of fruit
wine
from raw juice.

I think I know the answer to the sugar question. Is the task to add
enough sugar so the hydrometer level indicates 10-12% potential sugar for
the fermentation stages? If not, then how do I determine how much sugar
to
add.

What is the ideal acid level? I read that if the acid is low, add
more
and if it is high, add water to dilute. But I can't find what ideal or
even
nominal is.

--
Regards,

Casey Wilson
Freelance Writer and Photographer




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Old 02-12-2006, 02:25 PM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
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Posts: 917
Default Acid and sugar levels

A simple syrup is actually prefered but isn't necessary. Table sugar
has to break down into more simple surar to be fermented but wine is
acidic and does that naturally. Either way is going to be fine.

Malted barley is used for beer; boiled barley, sounds a little nasty as
a wine but I could be wrong. When you make beer you get the grains out
before you boil the 'wort' which is the fermentable liquid.

Sounds logical that I should handle the acidity first since the dilution will
change the specific gravity. At least I'm intuiting that the specific
gravity will change.


You have it right.

There is no limit to questions with this group; most of us were new at
this at some point and were helped by others.

Joe



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