Winemaking (rec.crafts.winemaking) Discussion of the process, recipes, tips, techniques and general exchange of lore on the process, methods and history of wine making. Includes traditional grape wines, sparkling wines & champagnes.

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Default Traditional Winemaking methods

An article on the health benefits of wine said that the traditional
methods used in Southern France and Sardinia were responsible for the
higher phenolic content of their wines.

Does anyone know what this method(s) are? Apparantly key to these
methods is fermenting on the skins for 2-3 weeks. How can this be done
safely?

thanks
Joe

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Default Traditional Winemaking methods

You must keep a layer of CO2 on the wine. You can either ferment in a
sealable container that allows you to keep the cap down such as a stainless
steel primary with a floating top or you can use a CO2 canister and maintain
a CO2 layer on top of the wine.

Ray

"Pino" > wrote in message
ps.com...
> An article on the health benefits of wine said that the traditional
> methods used in Southern France and Sardinia were responsible for the
> higher phenolic content of their wines.
>
> Does anyone know what this method(s) are? Apparantly key to these
> methods is fermenting on the skins for 2-3 weeks. How can this be done
> safely?
>
> thanks
> Joe
>



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Default Traditional Winemaking methods

If you keep a layer of CO2, you need a couple sheets of plastic wrap
first so you don't just carbonate you wine. You also need to replenish
the CO2 often enough to eventually remove the O2 that is present. the
two gases will constantly mix when you add CO2.

Ray Calvert wrote:
> You must keep a layer of CO2 on the wine. You can either ferment in a
> sealable container that allows you to keep the cap down such as a stainless
> steel primary with a floating top or you can use a CO2 canister and maintain
> a CO2 layer on top of the wine.
>
> Ray
>
> "Pino" > wrote in message
> ps.com...
> > An article on the health benefits of wine said that the traditional
> > methods used in Southern France and Sardinia were responsible for the
> > higher phenolic content of their wines.
> >
> > Does anyone know what this method(s) are? Apparantly key to these
> > methods is fermenting on the skins for 2-3 weeks. How can this be done
> > safely?
> >
> > thanks
> > Joe
> >


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Default Traditional Winemaking methods

The very short piece that I saw on TV news seemed to indicate that it
was due to the age of the vines. Of course, I believe very little of
what I see on the TV news.

Steve


On 30 Nov 2006 04:06:44 -0800, "Pino" > wrote:

>An article on the health benefits of wine said that the traditional
>methods used in Southern France and Sardinia were responsible for the
>higher phenolic content of their wines.
>
>Does anyone know what this method(s) are? Apparantly key to these
>methods is fermenting on the skins for 2-3 weeks. How can this be done
>safely?
>
>thanks
>Joe




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Default Traditional Winemaking methods

No more punchdowns, just let it rest with a tight cover of plastic wrap.
The CO2 left in the wine should protect it for a week or more. I do
this to some of my zin, and I like the result.

Gene

Pino wrote:
> Thanks for the information!
> I would like to try this next year and hopefully get darker cabs and
> pinot noir.
> Do you still need to punch down and stirr the skins after you start
> this extended fermentation?
> Joe
>
> wrote:
>
>>If you keep a layer of CO2, you need a couple sheets of plastic wrap
>>first so you don't just carbonate you wine. You also need to replenish
>>the CO2 often enough to eventually remove the O2 that is present. the
>>two gases will constantly mix when you add CO2.
>>
>>Ray Calvert wrote:
>>
>>>You must keep a layer of CO2 on the wine. You can either ferment in a
>>>sealable container that allows you to keep the cap down such as a stainless
>>>steel primary with a floating top or you can use a CO2 canister and maintain
>>>a CO2 layer on top of the wine.
>>>
>>>Ray
>>>
>>>"Pino" > wrote in message
roups.com...
>>>
>>>>An article on the health benefits of wine said that the traditional
>>>>methods used in Southern France and Sardinia were responsible for the
>>>>higher phenolic content of their wines.
>>>>
>>>>Does anyone know what this method(s) are? Apparantly key to these
>>>>methods is fermenting on the skins for 2-3 weeks. How can this be done
>>>>safely?
>>>>
>>>>thanks
>>>>Joe
>>>>

>
>

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Default Traditional Winemaking methods

> >Does anyone know what this method(s) are? Apparantly key to these
> >methods is fermenting on the skins for 2-3 weeks. How can this be done
> >safely?


With Pinot Noir they also may run off some of the free run and use that
as another wine; that concentrates the remainder. The free run makes a
very nice blush wine. California Central Valley Grenache is even
better as a blush, very perfumed.

Joe

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Default Traditional Winemaking methods

Joe Sallustio wrote:
> > >Does anyone know what this method(s) are? Apparantly key to these
> > >methods is fermenting on the skins for 2-3 weeks. How can this be done
> > >safely?

>
> With Pinot Noir they also may run off some of the free run and use that
> as another wine; that concentrates the remainder. The free run makes a
> very nice blush wine. California Central Valley Grenache is even
> better as a blush, very perfumed.
>

That is an interesting suggestion. My Pinot Noir is usually not very
dark. I may try this next year.
thanks
Joe

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Default Traditional Winemaking methods

If the cap is still forming, you must punch it down. But it should settle
before the extended fermentation finishes. I have done this and found that
I was nervous about it and gave it up. I, like you, have read that the
extended skin contact will yield a darker wine. But then I have red that
after most of the fermentation is over the skins can actually start taking
the pigments back up and lighten the wine. I don't know?????

Ray

"Pino" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> Thanks for the information!
> I would like to try this next year and hopefully get darker cabs and
> pinot noir.
> Do you still need to punch down and stirr the skins after you start
> this extended fermentation?
> Joe
>
> wrote:
>> If you keep a layer of CO2, you need a couple sheets of plastic wrap
>> first so you don't just carbonate you wine. You also need to replenish
>> the CO2 often enough to eventually remove the O2 that is present. the
>> two gases will constantly mix when you add CO2.
>>
>> Ray Calvert wrote:
>> > You must keep a layer of CO2 on the wine. You can either ferment in a
>> > sealable container that allows you to keep the cap down such as a
>> > stainless
>> > steel primary with a floating top or you can use a CO2 canister and
>> > maintain
>> > a CO2 layer on top of the wine.
>> >
>> > Ray
>> >
>> > "Pino" > wrote in message
>> > ps.com...
>> > > An article on the health benefits of wine said that the traditional
>> > > methods used in Southern France and Sardinia were responsible for the
>> > > higher phenolic content of their wines.
>> > >
>> > > Does anyone know what this method(s) are? Apparantly key to these
>> > > methods is fermenting on the skins for 2-3 weeks. How can this be
>> > > done
>> > > safely?
>> > >
>> > > thanks
>> > > Joe
>> > >

>
>



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Default Traditional Winemaking methods

I've seen a graph of the colour and tannin extraction in terms of
length of skin contact, I think in the Margalit's book. The tannins
keep on increasing although at a low rate after 10 days or so; colour
intensity reaches maximum at 7-10 days and then drops down a bit - so
yes, this would indicate the colour gets lighter. The drop on the graph
is not big, so it doesn't mean that an inky Can will suddenly turn
light.

Also, the other issue is colour stability, and the higher tannin
extraction in the extended maceration could help with that.

Pp

On Dec 5, 9:49 am, "Ray Calvert" > wrote:
> If the cap is still forming, you must punch it down. But it should settle
> before the extended fermentation finishes. I have done this and found that
> I was nervous about it and gave it up. I, like you, have read that the
> extended skin contact will yield a darker wine. But then I have red that
> after most of the fermentation is over the skins can actually start taking
> the pigments back up and lighten the wine. I don't know?????
>
> Ray
>
> "Pino" > wrote in ooglegroups.com...
>
>
>
> > Thanks for the information!
> > I would like to try this next year and hopefully get darker cabs and
> > pinot noir.
> > Do you still need to punch down and stirr the skins after you start
> > this extended fermentation?
> > Joe

>
> > wrote:
> >> If you keep a layer of CO2, you need a couple sheets of plastic wrap
> >> first so you don't just carbonate you wine. You also need to replenish
> >> the CO2 often enough to eventually remove the O2 that is present. the
> >> two gases will constantly mix when you add CO2.

>
> >> Ray Calvert wrote:
> >> > You must keep a layer of CO2 on the wine. You can either ferment in a
> >> > sealable container that allows you to keep the cap down such as a
> >> > stainless
> >> > steel primary with a floating top or you can use a CO2 canister and
> >> > maintain
> >> > a CO2 layer on top of the wine.

>
> >> > Ray

>
> >> > "Pino" > wrote in message
> >> ups.com...
> >> > > An article on the health benefits of wine said that the traditional
> >> > > methods used in Southern France and Sardinia were responsible for the
> >> > > higher phenolic content of their wines.

>
> >> > > Does anyone know what this method(s) are? Apparantly key to these
> >> > > methods is fermenting on the skins for 2-3 weeks. How can this be
> >> > > done
> >> > > safely?

>
> >> > > thanks
> >> > > Joe- Hide quoted text -- Show quoted text -


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