Winemaking (rec.crafts.winemaking) Discussion of the process, recipes, tips, techniques and general exchange of lore on the process, methods and history of wine making. Includes traditional grape wines, sparkling wines & champagnes.

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Old 30-11-2006, 09:40 AM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
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Default beer vs wine

So I have not heard too much about how beer is made. Are there any main
differences? Like the lees have to be removed still? The grains must be
boiled as to make the starches convertable? Some yeast are better at
processing starches? And why the alchol limit, ah because the yeast are
not able to process the wierd materials at higher alochol levels?

I like how wine is basically self sanitary and beer is not. Like you
basically can't get sick on 13% wine right?

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Matthew Suffidy - Ottawa, Canada

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http://matthew.chungus.com
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Old 30-11-2006, 12:04 PM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
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Default beer vs wine

So I have not heard too much about how beer is made. Are there any main
differences?


In a very general sense beer is made from grain and hops though fruit
and sugars are also used.

Like the lees have to be removed still?


The lees are called trub in beer and though I usually rack to a
secondary some do not.

The grains must be boiled as to make the starches convertable?


The grains are mashed at 150-160f for about an hour to convert the
starches. Grains are never boiled because that causes astringency.

Some yeast are better at processing starches? And why the alchol limit, ah because the
yeast are not able to process the wierd materials at higher alochol levels?


The toxicity of the alcohol shuts down the yeast. There will be some
residual starches and unfermentable sugars that will stop the yeast as
well but if I used the right yeast and techniques it's possible to brew
a 20%+ ABV beer. I frequently brew 10-11% beers with beer yeast.

I like how wine is basically self sanitary and beer is not.


This is true, but I tend to use the same sanitation techniques whether
I'm brewing beer, wine, or mead. It's not that much trouble and besides
sooner or later lazy people WILL get and infection in their beer/wine.

Like you basically can't get sick on 13% wine right?


Drink a gallon of 13% wine and tell us how you feel the next morning.

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Old 30-11-2006, 03:08 PM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
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Default beer vs wine

Matthew Suffidy wrote:
So I have not heard too much about how beer is made. Are there any main
differences? Like the lees have to be removed still? The grains must be
boiled as to make the starches convertable? Some yeast are better at
processing starches? And why the alchol limit, ah because the yeast are
not able to process the wierd materials at higher alochol levels?

I like how wine is basically self sanitary and beer is not. Like you
basically can't get sick on 13% wine right?



alt.beer.home-brewing
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Old 30-11-2006, 03:46 PM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
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Default beer vs wine


alt.beer.home-brewing


rec.crafts.brewing is a much more active group

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Old 30-11-2006, 09:58 PM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
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Default beer vs wine


Matthew Suffidy wrote:
So I have not heard too much about how beer is made. Are there any
main
differences?
Beer is made from grains- predominately 6 Row barley -Water, hops and
yeasts.

Like the lees have to be removed still?
The fermention of beer is similar to wine in that the removal of
"lees" removes the chance of certain off flavors getting into the beer.

The grains must be boiled as to make the starches convertable?
Boiling grains = bad, Malted grains are heated with water to create a
mash.

Some yeast are better at processing starches? And why the alchol limit,
ah because the yeast are not able to process the wierd materials at
higher alochol levels?
Beer yeast has a lower alcohol tolerance than wine yeast. But you can
ferment up to 20% and possibly higher. Also the high alcohol content
of wine is a recent a introduction for wine. Historically few wines
were over 9% or 10% ABV. As a side note the Boston Beer Company holds
the Guiness World record for the highest alcohol content in a fermented
beverage (including wine) with the beer Utopia. It actually takes
about 14 years for this beer to mature and is only released once every
2 years in extremely limited quantity.


I like how wine is basically self sanitary and beer is not. Like you
basically can't get sick on 13% wine right?
Actually no bacteria can survive the fermentation process in beer or
wine. Proper sanitation is needed in brewing and vinting to stop wild
bacteria and yeasts from infiltrating and changing the flavor of the
beverage. And personally a gallon of Carlo-Rossi makes me sick just to
look at, and it isnt even 13% ABV.

Try www.howtobrew.com for more general info. There are also many books
on the subject some more scientific than others.



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Old 01-12-2006, 10:37 AM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
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Default beer vs wine

rec.crafts.brewing is a much more active group

We are making beer this weekend and that group is very active and very
helpful. We do pretty much what you do to a tee.

Joe

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Old 05-12-2006, 05:43 PM posted to rec.crafts.winemaking
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Default beer vs wine

I am sure that there are those who will disagree with me but here are the
main differences I have noted in making beer:

1) Beer making is more trouble than Wine making.
2) Wine making is easier but requires more patience.
3) After making a 5 gal. batch of beer, a few friends will always show up
(it is a magnet) and it will be gone in a weekend.
4) After making a 5 gal batch of wine, it lasts a while.

Anyway, that is my assessment! ;o)

Ray

"Matthew Suffidy" wrote in message
net.ca...
So I have not heard too much about how beer is made. Are there any main
differences? Like the lees have to be removed still? The grains must be
boiled as to make the starches convertable? Some yeast are better at
processing starches? And why the alchol limit, ah because the yeast are
not able to process the wierd materials at higher alochol levels?

I like how wine is basically self sanitary and beer is not. Like you
basically can't get sick on 13% wine right?

--
--------------------------------------------
Matthew Suffidy - Ottawa, Canada

(use as printed)
http://matthew.chungus.com
--------------------------------------------





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