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Default Barolo

1999 Pio Cesare Barolo...

I have never really enjoyed a Barolo. I had one a few years ago that was a
Gambero Rosso 3 glass winner I cannot remember the name. It was so harsh,
tannic and green I could not drink.

This one was at Costco and I checked ratings Tanzer and Parker liked. Does
anyone nere know this wine.

Also, does Barolo have characteristics you can compare to Burgundy or
Cabernet more? If there a way to compare as the grape is Nebbiolo which I
have limited experience with.







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On Thu, 11 May 2006 13:57:52 GMT, "Richard Neidich"
> wrote:

>1999 Pio Cesare Barolo...
>
>I have never really enjoyed a Barolo. I had one a few years ago that was a
>Gambero Rosso 3 glass winner I cannot remember the name. It was so harsh,
>tannic and green I could not drink.
>
>This one was at Costco and I checked ratings Tanzer and Parker liked. Does
>anyone nere know this wine.
>
>Also, does Barolo have characteristics you can compare to Burgundy or
>Cabernet more? If there a way to compare as the grape is Nebbiolo which I
>have limited experience with.


I've got fairly limited experience with Barolo, although had I a
bigger budget I would certainly be aggressive about correcting that
shortfall.

I had a Pio Cesare several years ago at a wonderful Italian restaurant
in Taos. Didn't save any notes and don't find it in my Cellar software
list, but the fact that I remember it in my dotage indicates it was a
quality experience. The vintage, based on the years of regular Taos
visits, would have been about ten years older than your wine.

Barolos that I've enjoyed tend to be dark and brooding wines, usually
brown tinged and occasionally exhibiting the damp basement or rubber
boot funk that I've long associated with Italian wines. Good Barolos
at drinkable age, however, tend to be a lot bigger and warmer than
that funkiness. The Pio Cesare was one of those wines, sans funk.

Please report back in five or ten years when you drink this.


Ed Rasimus
Fighter Pilot (USAF-Ret)
"When Thunder Rolled"
www.thunderchief.org
www.thundertales.blogspot.com
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Richard Neidich wrote:
> 1999 Pio Cesare Barolo...
>
> I have never really enjoyed a Barolo. I had one a few years ago that was a
> Gambero Rosso 3 glass winner I cannot remember the name. It was so harsh,
> tannic and green I could not drink.
>
> This one was at Costco and I checked ratings Tanzer and Parker liked. Does
> anyone nere know this wine.
>
> Also, does Barolo have characteristics you can compare to Burgundy or
> Cabernet more? If there a way to compare as the grape is Nebbiolo which I
> have limited experience with.
>


I had a 1997 Pio Cesare Barolo 2 years ago (I know, infanticide) but
did not take notes.

IMHO I do not think one can adequately assess Barolo (or, for that
matter, Nebbiolo, the grape) by comapring it with Cabernet Sauvignon or
Pinot Noir. Furthermore, Nebbiolo finds differing statements in Barolo,
Barbera, Gattinara and Nebbiolo d'Alba (and other wines which I have
not had the good fortune to taste, for instance Ghemme). I really do
remember having a glass of a very jammy Nebbiolo from Lombardy (not
Piemonte) 4-5 years ago in a small eatery in Rome as well - but since I
find no reference to Lombardian Nebbiolo elsewhere, I sometimes think I
was mistaken. And aren't the wines in Valtellina made from Nebbiolo as
well? There must be others - even if not among the DOC's.

The Nebbiolo does usually impart a brownish tinge to the rim of the
pour in all these cases (which spreads with ageing, in my experience).
The grape also gives its wines a powerful balance between acidity,
tannins and "extraktstoffe". The classic nose of violets tends to be
common across all Nebbiolo-based wines that I have tried.

With Barolo especially, I feel, the ageing in wood imparts it a typical
structure. I also find Barolo often (not always) to be heavier on
tannins, saddle, tobacco and mud than Barbaresco - which has, to my
palate, a "lightness of being". Not lightness, which I taste, as an
example, in Gattinara, just a kind of elegance and finesse.

And of course, even Gattinara's lightness is only in comparison to
Barolo and Barbaresco. In fact, it is this "lightness", which makes it
- for my money - to be more accessible, especially when not very old.

Depending on the producer and vintage, fruit and spice characteristics
of a Barolo vary. In fact the wine is typically such a bomb that I have
sometimes sniffed at a poured glass for an hour or more (no kidding)
without sipping. Just could not bring myself to sip it - it felt like
licking a Rafaelo fresco!

I have once had a 22-year old Barbaresco (thanks to a distress sale,
not a lottery win) and it was one of the most exhilirating experience
in wine-drinking that I have ever had. But I have not had a Barolo that
old, yet. I am keeping a few though - at least for 3-4 years.

Also, wit regards to greenness, I remember someone telling me to air a
Barolo or a Barbaresco for 40-60 minutes per year of age. I do not
think the person meant this advice for 20 year old wines though.

Cheers

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Default Barolo

Excellent producer, Pio Boffa blends his Barolo from several vineyards.
Makes a good Gavi too. He lowered times on the skins to produce less tannic
wines....More later on my 1985 visit.
"TB" > wrote in message
oups.com...
>
> Richard Neidich wrote:
> > 1999 Pio Cesare Barolo...
> >
> > I have never really enjoyed a Barolo. I had one a few years ago that

was a
> > Gambero Rosso 3 glass winner I cannot remember the name. It was so

harsh,
> > tannic and green I could not drink.
> >
> > This one was at Costco and I checked ratings Tanzer and Parker liked.

Does
> > anyone nere know this wine.
> >
> > Also, does Barolo have characteristics you can compare to Burgundy or
> > Cabernet more? If there a way to compare as the grape is Nebbiolo which

I
> > have limited experience with.
> >

>
> I had a 1997 Pio Cesare Barolo 2 years ago (I know, infanticide) but
> did not take notes.
>
> IMHO I do not think one can adequately assess Barolo (or, for that
> matter, Nebbiolo, the grape) by comapring it with Cabernet Sauvignon or
> Pinot Noir. Furthermore, Nebbiolo finds differing statements in Barolo,
> Barbera, Gattinara and Nebbiolo d'Alba (and other wines which I have
> not had the good fortune to taste, for instance Ghemme). I really do
> remember having a glass of a very jammy Nebbiolo from Lombardy (not
> Piemonte) 4-5 years ago in a small eatery in Rome as well - but since I
> find no reference to Lombardian Nebbiolo elsewhere, I sometimes think I
> was mistaken. And aren't the wines in Valtellina made from Nebbiolo as
> well? There must be others - even if not among the DOC's.
>
> The Nebbiolo does usually impart a brownish tinge to the rim of the
> pour in all these cases (which spreads with ageing, in my experience).
> The grape also gives its wines a powerful balance between acidity,
> tannins and "extraktstoffe". The classic nose of violets tends to be
> common across all Nebbiolo-based wines that I have tried.
>
> With Barolo especially, I feel, the ageing in wood imparts it a typical
> structure. I also find Barolo often (not always) to be heavier on
> tannins, saddle, tobacco and mud than Barbaresco - which has, to my
> palate, a "lightness of being". Not lightness, which I taste, as an
> example, in Gattinara, just a kind of elegance and finesse.
>
> And of course, even Gattinara's lightness is only in comparison to
> Barolo and Barbaresco. In fact, it is this "lightness", which makes it
> - for my money - to be more accessible, especially when not very old.
>
> Depending on the producer and vintage, fruit and spice characteristics
> of a Barolo vary. In fact the wine is typically such a bomb that I have
> sometimes sniffed at a poured glass for an hour or more (no kidding)
> without sipping. Just could not bring myself to sip it - it felt like
> licking a Rafaelo fresco!
>
> I have once had a 22-year old Barbaresco (thanks to a distress sale,
> not a lottery win) and it was one of the most exhilirating experience
> in wine-drinking that I have ever had. But I have not had a Barolo that
> old, yet. I am keeping a few though - at least for 3-4 years.
>
> Also, wit regards to greenness, I remember someone telling me to air a
> Barolo or a Barbaresco for 40-60 minutes per year of age. I do not
> think the person meant this advice for 20 year old wines though.
>
> Cheers
>



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More on Pio Cesare.
(from my wine memoirs)

Planning for the 30 day trip to Italy, Jim Morris and I took in 1985,
started almost 6 months before. Of the major "houses". Phil Debelardino of
Hublein got us lodging at Ceretto, Monsanto and Capazzana. Mark DeGrazia
made arrangements to meet him in Tuscany.

A few firms resisted our attempts for appointments based on the fact that I
worked part time at a small retailer, so my response from William Grants
stable was negative. My friends the Currados of Vietti got us into G.
Conterno.

Paterno Imports also turned us down until I talked to one of their VPs, so
visits to Ratti, Pio Cesare and Lungarotti were scheduled. When I first
started to work for Milford Liquors, the Paterno Maryland rep came to see me
to see if I would order more Corvo and Santa Margherita. He was surprised
we had Lungarotti in stock. At the time decent vintages of Ratti and Pio
Cesare were not available in Maryland. After talking with the wholesaler, I
got about 5 other accounts to order the latest Ratti Dolcetto and 1982 Ratti
Barolos and the latest Pio Cesare Gavi and 1982 Barolo. In the mean time
the Paterno rep was fired because although his overall sales were up he did
not sell his quota of Corvo.
Later on the regional Paterno rep got very upset when he learned the
DeGrazia facings in most major Maryland accounts exceeded those of Paterno,
which upset Mr. Terlato who did so much for me in 1985. The word betrayal
was used to my describe my subsequent activities as De Grazia's Maryland
rep.

Anyway, I was warmly greeted by the late Signor Ratti. Naturally he was
interested in our "Program" and when he found out that I was dining with the
Currados, Ceretto, Borgogno and Giacosa wanted us to schedule a meal with
him. Pio Boffa had talked to Robert Parker, Angelo Gaja and my friends the
Currados and decided against Paterno's advice and arranged a meal with us at
Daniels in Alba, where he presented all his wines over a leisurely lunch.




"Joe "Beppe"Rosenberg" > wrote in message
. ..
> Excellent producer, Pio Boffa blends his Barolo from several vineyards.
> Makes a good Gavi too. He lowered times on the skins to produce less

tannic
> wines....More later on my 1985 visit.
> "TB" > wrote in message
> oups.com...
> >
> > Richard Neidich wrote:
> > > 1999 Pio Cesare Barolo...
> > >
> > > I have never really enjoyed a Barolo. I had one a few years ago that

> was a
> > > Gambero Rosso 3 glass winner I cannot remember the name. It was so

> harsh,
> > > tannic and green I could not drink.
> > >
> > > This one was at Costco and I checked ratings Tanzer and Parker liked.

> Does
> > > anyone nere know this wine.
> > >
> > > Also, does Barolo have characteristics you can compare to Burgundy or
> > > Cabernet more? If there a way to compare as the grape is Nebbiolo

which
> I
> > > have limited experience with.
> > >

> >
> > I had a 1997 Pio Cesare Barolo 2 years ago (I know, infanticide) but
> > did not take notes.
> >
> > IMHO I do not think one can adequately assess Barolo (or, for that
> > matter, Nebbiolo, the grape) by comapring it with Cabernet Sauvignon or
> > Pinot Noir. Furthermore, Nebbiolo finds differing statements in Barolo,
> > Barbera, Gattinara and Nebbiolo d'Alba (and other wines which I have
> > not had the good fortune to taste, for instance Ghemme). I really do
> > remember having a glass of a very jammy Nebbiolo from Lombardy (not
> > Piemonte) 4-5 years ago in a small eatery in Rome as well - but since I
> > find no reference to Lombardian Nebbiolo elsewhere, I sometimes think I
> > was mistaken. And aren't the wines in Valtellina made from Nebbiolo as
> > well? There must be others - even if not among the DOC's.
> >
> > The Nebbiolo does usually impart a brownish tinge to the rim of the
> > pour in all these cases (which spreads with ageing, in my experience).
> > The grape also gives its wines a powerful balance between acidity,
> > tannins and "extraktstoffe". The classic nose of violets tends to be
> > common across all Nebbiolo-based wines that I have tried.
> >
> > With Barolo especially, I feel, the ageing in wood imparts it a typical
> > structure. I also find Barolo often (not always) to be heavier on
> > tannins, saddle, tobacco and mud than Barbaresco - which has, to my
> > palate, a "lightness of being". Not lightness, which I taste, as an
> > example, in Gattinara, just a kind of elegance and finesse.
> >
> > And of course, even Gattinara's lightness is only in comparison to
> > Barolo and Barbaresco. In fact, it is this "lightness", which makes it
> > - for my money - to be more accessible, especially when not very old.
> >
> > Depending on the producer and vintage, fruit and spice characteristics
> > of a Barolo vary. In fact the wine is typically such a bomb that I have
> > sometimes sniffed at a poured glass for an hour or more (no kidding)
> > without sipping. Just could not bring myself to sip it - it felt like
> > licking a Rafaelo fresco!
> >
> > I have once had a 22-year old Barbaresco (thanks to a distress sale,
> > not a lottery win) and it was one of the most exhilirating experience
> > in wine-drinking that I have ever had. But I have not had a Barolo that
> > old, yet. I am keeping a few though - at least for 3-4 years.
> >
> > Also, wit regards to greenness, I remember someone telling me to air a
> > Barolo or a Barbaresco for 40-60 minutes per year of age. I do not
> > think the person meant this advice for 20 year old wines though.
> >
> > Cheers
> >

>
>



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