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Old 27-01-2006, 07:42 AM posted to alt.food.wine
Daisy
 
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Default Sauvignon blanc

Please tell me what is sauv.blanc called in France? I drink this
nectar most of the time, and as I live in New Zealand I can buy it at
variously from $12-18 for a good medium range sauv.blanc. If I want
to go higher I can pay heaps more.

I just bought a case of Saints Marlborough Sauv.Blanc for nz$120. It
was on special at a supermarket. This is just SO cheap for such a
splendid wine.

Really special sauv.blancs exported to the US are Sacred Hill and
Cloudy Bay. You will pay for these in the US I know. But come to NZ
and I can provide you with wines like this just as good for half the
price.

Cheers

Daisy

Carthage demands an explanation for this insolence!

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Old 27-01-2006, 10:51 AM posted to alt.food.wine
John Taverner
 
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Default Sauvignon blanc


"Mike Tommasi" wrote in message
...
Daisy wrote:
Please tell me what is sauv.blanc called in France?


Sancerre (blanc)
Pouilly Fumé


Mike
Why some are called Pouilly Blanc and others Pouilly Blanc Fume, or am I
being pedantic.
John


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Old 27-01-2006, 10:52 AM posted to alt.food.wine
Ed Starren
 
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Default Sauvignon blanc

Daisy,

In France the grape is also called Sauvignon Blanc. I't's the grape of the
river Loire in the northwest of France. Famous Sauvignon Blanc wines are
Sancerre and Pouilly fumé. But also in the south of France grows the
Sauvignon Blanc grape. The degree of acidity is for the Sauvignon Blanc
grape in France much higher then in New Zealand.

A famous winemaker of Sauvignon Blanc is: Domaine Henry Pelle, look at:
http://www.henry-pelle.com/

Greetings

Ed out of Holland
weblog: www.wijnerij.web-log.nl



"Daisy" schreef in bericht
...
Please tell me what is sauv.blanc called in France? I drink this
nectar most of the time, and as I live in New Zealand I can buy it at
variously from $12-18 for a good medium range sauv.blanc. If I want
to go higher I can pay heaps more.

I just bought a case of Saints Marlborough Sauv.Blanc for nz$120. It
was on special at a supermarket. This is just SO cheap for such a
splendid wine.

Really special sauv.blancs exported to the US are Sacred Hill and
Cloudy Bay. You will pay for these in the US I know. But come to NZ
and I can provide you with wines like this just as good for half the
price.

Cheers

Daisy

Carthage demands an explanation for this insolence!



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Old 27-01-2006, 11:03 AM posted to alt.food.wine
Nils Gustaf Lindgren
 
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Default Sauvignon blanc

In a different style, you get Sauv Blanc from Pessac-Leognan - not always
blended with Semillion. E g Smith Haut Lafite, 95% Sauv Blanc, 5% Sauv Gris
(a clone with more color and, I think, milder taste). The difference in
style rests in the fifferent clima (warmer in Bordeaux) and oak aging.

Cheers

N ils Gustaf


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Old 27-01-2006, 11:40 AM posted to alt.food.wine
Nils Gustaf Lindgren
 
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Default Sauvignon blanc


"John Taverner" skrev i meddelandet
.uk...

"Mike Tommasi" wrote in message
...
Daisy wrote:
Please tell me what is sauv.blanc called in France?


Sancerre (blanc)
Pouilly Fumé


Mike
Why some are called Pouilly Blanc and others Pouilly Blanc Fume, or am I
being pedantic.


It´s always Pouilly Fumé - when we discuss the Sauvignon Blanc from the
right-hand side of the Loire. A Pouilly FUmé is always white (blanc), and
always made from SB.
However, sometimes wines from e g California made from Sauv Bl are labelled
as Fumé Blanc, if I remember correctly. I seem to recollect thaat this stems
from some certain producer.
HTH
Nils Gustaf




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Old 27-01-2006, 12:34 PM posted to alt.food.wine
Timothy Hartley
 
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Default Sauvignon blanc

In message
Mike Tommasi wrote:

Daisy wrote:
Please tell me what is sauv.blanc called in France?


Sancerre (blanc)
Pouilly Fumé

There is also a much cheaper Sauvignon Blanc which can be very good.
It has recently been promoted from VDQS to AoC as St. Bris.
St.Bris-le-Vineux, as its name suggests has ben making wine for many
hundred years. It is above Irancy and over the river (Yonne) from
Auxerre and over the hills from Chablis!
It is there that I saw the wonderful suggestion "Si le vin te gêne
dans ton travail, supprime le travail" and the happy comment that
”Le bon vin et l‘amour fait passer d‘heureux jours•

(Loosely translated, respectively, ”If wine get in the way of work,
give up work• and ”Good wine and love while away happy days•

Tim Hartley
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Old 27-01-2006, 01:47 PM posted to alt.food.wine
Timothy Hartley
 
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Default Sauvignon blanc

In message
Mike Tommasi wrote:

Timothy Hartley wrote:
In message
Mike Tommasi wrote:


Daisy wrote:

Please tell me what is sauv.blanc called in France?

Sancerre (blanc)
Pouilly Fumé


There is also a much cheaper Sauvignon Blanc which can be very good.
It has recently been promoted from VDQS to AoC as St. Bris.
St.Bris-le-Vineux, as its name suggests has ben making wine for many
hundred years. It is above Irancy and over the river (Yonne) from
Auxerre and over the hills from Chablis!
It is there that I saw the wonderful suggestion "Si le vin te gêne
dans ton travail, supprime le travail" and the happy comment that
”Le bon vin et l‘amour fait passer d‘heureux jours•

(Loosely translated, respectively, ”If wine get in the way of work,
give up work• and ”Good wine and love while away happy days•


Yes, indeed...

Now I was trying to keep it simple, but when you dig deeper you find
that sauvignon is 21% of the grapes planted for white wine in Bordeaux.
Now 21% of 15000ha is a lot of grapes... more than the sauvignon grown
in Sancerre and Pouilly Fumé AOCs together...


But it is quite often blended with Semillon rather than being bottled
on its own.


Tim Hartley
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Old 27-01-2006, 02:34 PM posted to alt.food.wine
Timothy Hartley
 
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Default Sauvignon blanc

In message
Mike Tommasi wrote:

Timothy Hartley wrote:
In message
Mike Tommasi wrote:


Timothy Hartley wrote:

In message
Mike Tommasi wrote:



Daisy wrote:


Please tell me what is sauv.blanc called in France?

Sancerre (blanc)
Pouilly Fumé

There is also a much cheaper Sauvignon Blanc which can be very good.
It has recently been promoted from VDQS to AoC as St. Bris.
St.Bris-le-Vineux, as its name suggests has ben making wine for many
hundred years. It is above Irancy and over the river (Yonne) from
Auxerre and over the hills from Chablis!
It is there that I saw the wonderful suggestion "Si le vin te gêne
dans ton travail, supprime le travail" and the happy comment that
”Le bon vin et l‘amour fait passer d‘heureux jours•

(Loosely translated, respectively, ”If wine get in the way of work,
give up work• and ”Good wine and love while away happy days•

Yes, indeed...

Now I was trying to keep it simple, but when you dig deeper you find
that sauvignon is 21% of the grapes planted for white wine in Bordeaux.
Now 21% of 15000ha is a lot of grapes... more than the sauvignon grown
in Sancerre and Pouilly Fumé AOCs together...



But it is quite often blended with Semillon rather than being bottled
on its own.


In fact, probably always blended.

Well I have occasionally had straight Sauvignon Blanc though it is not
something for which I would necessarily hunt a long way or pay a high
price.

Timothy Hartley
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Old 27-01-2006, 04:16 PM posted to alt.food.wine
Dan The Man
 
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Default Sauvignon blanc

It´s always Pouilly Fumé - when we discuss the Sauvignon Blanc from the
right-hand side of the Loire. A Pouilly FUmé is always white (blanc), and
always made from SB.
However, sometimes wines from e g California made from Sauv Bl are labelled
as Fumé Blanc, if I remember correctly. I seem to recollect thaat this stems
from some certain producer.
HTH
Nils Gustaf


Nils, I believe it was Robert Mondavi who used "Fume Blanc" first.
others will correct me if I'm wrong.

Dan-O (you say potato, I say fumato)

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Old 27-01-2006, 04:51 PM posted to alt.food.wine
Nils Gustaf Lindgren
 
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Default Sauvignon blanc

Hello;
No Mike, that is not so - as I pointed out, Smith haut Lafite is all
Sauvignon (95 % blanc, 5 % Gris)
and a lovely drink BTW, if pricey.

Cheers

Nils Gustaf

--
Respond to nils dot lindgren at drchips dot se





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Old 27-01-2006, 05:04 PM posted to alt.food.wine
Emery Davis
 
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Default Sauvignon blanc

On Fri, 27 Jan 2006 12:34:12 GMT
Timothy Hartley wrote:

In message
Mike Tommasi wrote:

Daisy wrote:
Please tell me what is sauv.blanc called in France?


Sancerre (blanc)
Pouilly Fumé

There is also a much cheaper Sauvignon Blanc which can be very good.
It has recently been promoted from VDQS to AoC as St. Bris.
St.Bris-le-Vineux, as its name suggests has ben making wine for many
hundred years. It is above Irancy and over the river (Yonne) from
Auxerre and over the hills from Chablis!
It is there that I saw the wonderful suggestion "Si le vin te gêne
dans ton travail, supprime le travail" and the happy comment that
”Le bon vin et l‘amour fait passer d‘heureux jours•

(Loosely translated, respectively, ”If wine get in the way of work,
give up work• and ”Good wine and love while away happy days•


Too right!

A nice Sauvignon St. Bris to look for is from Sorin DeFrance.
Very reliable, available, and inexpensive to boot.

-E

--
Emery Davis
You can reply to ecom
by removing the well known companies

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Old 27-01-2006, 08:02 PM posted to alt.food.wine
Mark Lipton
 
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Default Sauvignon blanc

Timothy Hartley wrote:

There is also a much cheaper Sauvignon Blanc which can be very good.
It has recently been promoted from VDQS to AoC as St. Bris.
St.Bris-le-Vineux, as its name suggests has ben making wine for many
hundred years. It is above Irancy and over the river (Yonne) from
Auxerre and over the hills from Chablis!


There is also Sauvignon blanc grown in regions of the Loire outside of
the AOCs already mentioned. For instance, there's the Ouily-Thesée
co-op or Clos Roches Blanches in the Touraine, both of which are usually
great values.

Mark Lipton
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Old 27-01-2006, 08:03 PM posted to alt.food.wine
Mark Lipton
 
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Default Sauvignon blanc

Dan The Man wrote:

Nils, I believe it was Robert Mondavi who used "Fume Blanc" first.
others will correct me if I'm wrong.


100% correct, Dan. Mondavi coined the term for his dry SB (making
oblique reference to Pouilly-Fumé in the process) to distinguish it from
the sweet versions in vogue in CA at that time (the early '60s).

Mark Lipton
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Old 27-01-2006, 08:18 PM posted to alt.food.wine
Timothy Hartley
 
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Default Sauvignon blanc

In message
"Nils Gustaf Lindgren"
wrote:

Hello;
No Mike, that is not so - as I pointed out, Smith haut Lafite is all
Sauvignon (95 % blanc, 5 % Gris)
and a lovely drink BTW, if pricey.

Cheers

Nils Gustaf

According to Cocks & Feret planted with 90% Sauvignon blanç 5% gris &
5% Semillon — and therefore almost certainly blended in any year so,
as the lawyers say when they are being rude, with the utmost respect,
neither Mike‘s point nor mine is traduced by that example.


Tim Hartley
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Old 28-01-2006, 09:36 AM posted to alt.food.wine
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 365
Default Sauvignon blanc

"Timothy Hartley" skrev i meddelandet
...
In message
"Nils Gustaf Lindgren"
wrote:

Hello;
No Mike, that is not so - as I pointed out, Smith haut Lafite is all
Sauvignon (95 % blanc, 5 % Gris)
and a lovely drink BTW, if pricey.

Cheers

Nils Gustaf

According to Cocks & Feret planted with 90% Sauvignon blanç 5% gris &
5% Semillon - and therefore almost certainly blended in any year so,
as the lawyers say when they are being rude, with the utmost respect,
neither Mike's point nor mine is traduced by that example.



With all due respect - please view www.smith-haut-lafitte.com/ where you
will find that the white SHL from 1997 till 2002 in all cases have the same
mix - 95 blanc, 5 gris. The fact that they also cultivate semillion is
neither here nor there, as the domaine is large and has several other (no
doubt excellent) wines.

Really, I wouldn´t (especially after MikeT had made a comment, and MikeT´s
knowledge about wines is damn near encyclopedical) post a disagreement
without checking up - from the horse´s mouth, as it were.

Cheers!

Nils Gustaf




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