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Old 26-03-2005, 05:10 PM
Dick R.
 
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Default Food/Wine pairing - Valpolicella

Hi All,
Received a bottle of Allegrini Valpolicella in a mixed
case for Christmas. I've never tried Valpolicella, but in
the back of my mind I seem to recall that it is good with
red sauce pasta. Any thoughts?

TIA
Dick R.

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Old 26-03-2005, 07:09 PM
Mark Lipton
 
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Default

Dick R. wrote:
Hi All,
Received a bottle of Allegrini Valpolicella in a mixed
case for Christmas. I've never tried Valpolicella, but in
the back of my mind I seem to recall that it is good with
red sauce pasta. Any thoughts?


Valpolicella, especially as made by Allegrini, is a full-bodied red wine
with lots of character and acidity. It would probably do all right with
a red pasta sauce, but if you're looking for a regional match keep in
mind that you don't see many red sauces in the Veneto, where
Valpolicella is located. I'd say Osso Bucco would make a fine match, as
would most red meats.

HTH
Mark Lipton
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Old 26-03-2005, 07:43 PM
Dick R.
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Mark Lipton wrote:
Dick R. wrote:

Hi All,
Received a bottle of Allegrini Valpolicella in a mixed
case for Christmas. I've never tried Valpolicella, but in
the back of my mind I seem to recall that it is good with
red sauce pasta. Any thoughts?



Valpolicella, especially as made by Allegrini, is a full-bodied red wine
with lots of character and acidity. It would probably do all right with
a red pasta sauce, but if you're looking for a regional match keep in
mind that you don't see many red sauces in the Veneto, where
Valpolicella is located. I'd say Osso Bucco would make a fine match, as
would most red meats.

HTH
Mark Lipton

Hi Mark,
Thanks for the reply. I can understand red meats (I'm a basic carnivore),
but without searching through my wife's cookbook collection, what's
Osso Bucco?

Thanks,
Dick R.
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Old 26-03-2005, 07:43 PM
Dick R.
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Mark Lipton wrote:
Dick R. wrote:

Hi All,
Received a bottle of Allegrini Valpolicella in a mixed
case for Christmas. I've never tried Valpolicella, but in
the back of my mind I seem to recall that it is good with
red sauce pasta. Any thoughts?



Valpolicella, especially as made by Allegrini, is a full-bodied red wine
with lots of character and acidity. It would probably do all right with
a red pasta sauce, but if you're looking for a regional match keep in
mind that you don't see many red sauces in the Veneto, where
Valpolicella is located. I'd say Osso Bucco would make a fine match, as
would most red meats.

HTH
Mark Lipton

Hi Mark,
Thanks for the reply. I can understand red meats (I'm a basic carnivore),
but without searching through my wife's cookbook collection, what's
Osso Bucco?

Thanks,
Dick R.
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Old 26-03-2005, 08:56 PM
Ed Rasimus
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 13:43:35 -0600, "Dick R." wrote:

Mark Lipton wrote:
Dick R. wrote:

Hi All,
Received a bottle of Allegrini Valpolicella in a mixed
case for Christmas. I've never tried Valpolicella, but in
the back of my mind I seem to recall that it is good with
red sauce pasta. Any thoughts?



Valpolicella, especially as made by Allegrini, is a full-bodied red wine
with lots of character and acidity. It would probably do all right with
a red pasta sauce, but if you're looking for a regional match keep in
mind that you don't see many red sauces in the Veneto, where
Valpolicella is located. I'd say Osso Bucco would make a fine match, as
would most red meats.

HTH
Mark Lipton

Hi Mark,
Thanks for the reply. I can understand red meats (I'm a basic carnivore),
but without searching through my wife's cookbook collection, what's
Osso Bucco?

Thanks,
Dick R.


Braised veal shanks. Typically rounds of veal with a marrow bone, done
in a stew of carrots, tomatoes, etc. The meat is delicate and tender
with great flavors. And, the best part is spreading the marrow on some
fine Italian bread. Often served with gnocci or polenta.

Personally, I go with Pinot Noir when I convince the wife to do Osso
Bucco, but I'll add that a light Valpolicella reminds me a lot of a
bright, cherry-oriented PN.

I never like Valpolicella very much until I discovered (typical
ignorant American, that I am) that Valpolicella in jug bottles is
about the same relationship to good Valpolicella as "chianti" is to
Chianti Classico. The "real thing" can be sublime.

Recently I got introduced to the rippasso style of Valpo, sort of a
second cousin to Amarone. These wines are big, warm, heavy and
certainly work well for me with almost any Italian cuisine.


Ed Rasimus
Fighter Pilot (USAF-Ret)
"When Thunder Rolled"
www.thunderchief.org
www.thundertales.blogspot.com


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Old 26-03-2005, 08:56 PM
Ed Rasimus
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 13:43:35 -0600, "Dick R." wrote:

Mark Lipton wrote:
Dick R. wrote:

Hi All,
Received a bottle of Allegrini Valpolicella in a mixed
case for Christmas. I've never tried Valpolicella, but in
the back of my mind I seem to recall that it is good with
red sauce pasta. Any thoughts?



Valpolicella, especially as made by Allegrini, is a full-bodied red wine
with lots of character and acidity. It would probably do all right with
a red pasta sauce, but if you're looking for a regional match keep in
mind that you don't see many red sauces in the Veneto, where
Valpolicella is located. I'd say Osso Bucco would make a fine match, as
would most red meats.

HTH
Mark Lipton

Hi Mark,
Thanks for the reply. I can understand red meats (I'm a basic carnivore),
but without searching through my wife's cookbook collection, what's
Osso Bucco?

Thanks,
Dick R.


Braised veal shanks. Typically rounds of veal with a marrow bone, done
in a stew of carrots, tomatoes, etc. The meat is delicate and tender
with great flavors. And, the best part is spreading the marrow on some
fine Italian bread. Often served with gnocci or polenta.

Personally, I go with Pinot Noir when I convince the wife to do Osso
Bucco, but I'll add that a light Valpolicella reminds me a lot of a
bright, cherry-oriented PN.

I never like Valpolicella very much until I discovered (typical
ignorant American, that I am) that Valpolicella in jug bottles is
about the same relationship to good Valpolicella as "chianti" is to
Chianti Classico. The "real thing" can be sublime.

Recently I got introduced to the rippasso style of Valpo, sort of a
second cousin to Amarone. These wines are big, warm, heavy and
certainly work well for me with almost any Italian cuisine.


Ed Rasimus
Fighter Pilot (USAF-Ret)
"When Thunder Rolled"
www.thunderchief.org
www.thundertales.blogspot.com
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Old 26-03-2005, 09:10 PM
 
Posts: n/a
Default


Dick R. wrote:
Hi All,
Received a bottle of Allegrini Valpolicella in a mixed
case for Christmas. I've never tried Valpolicella, but in
the back of my mind I seem to recall that it is good with
red sauce pasta. Any thoughts?

TIA
Dick R.


A veal roll is good, stuffed with spinach and eggs.

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Old 26-03-2005, 09:10 PM
 
Posts: n/a
Default


Dick R. wrote:
Hi All,
Received a bottle of Allegrini Valpolicella in a mixed
case for Christmas. I've never tried Valpolicella, but in
the back of my mind I seem to recall that it is good with
red sauce pasta. Any thoughts?

TIA
Dick R.


A veal roll is good, stuffed with spinach and eggs.

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Old 26-03-2005, 09:11 PM
Tom S
 
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Default


"Dick R." wrote in message
...
but without searching through my wife's cookbook collection, what's
Osso Bucco?


Literally translated, it means "bone with a hole" as I recall.

Osso Bucco is an incredibly delicious dish prepared from veal shanks.
They're baked in a covered casserole with a mixture of chopped vegetables
(onion, carrot and celery) in beef broth. Garlic, tomatoes, lemon peel,
basil, s&p, white wine, olive oil, thyme and bay leaf also go in.

It's an easy dish to prepare, but there's a lot of chopping required. Also,
it's best to make one's own broth rather than use the store bought boullion.

When the shanks are falling-off-the-bone tender, they are removed to a
platter and the sauce is thickened by reduction and adding flour. The
traditional accompaniment is risotto Milanese, but I usually just serve it
over plain rice and drink Chardonnay with it.

I have a detailed recipe for 6, but it's in jpeg format so I won't post it
here. E-mail me if you're interested, with osso buco in the subject line.
Remove dontspam from my address.

Tom S


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Old 26-03-2005, 09:11 PM
Tom S
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Dick R." wrote in message
...
but without searching through my wife's cookbook collection, what's
Osso Bucco?


Literally translated, it means "bone with a hole" as I recall.

Osso Bucco is an incredibly delicious dish prepared from veal shanks.
They're baked in a covered casserole with a mixture of chopped vegetables
(onion, carrot and celery) in beef broth. Garlic, tomatoes, lemon peel,
basil, s&p, white wine, olive oil, thyme and bay leaf also go in.

It's an easy dish to prepare, but there's a lot of chopping required. Also,
it's best to make one's own broth rather than use the store bought boullion.

When the shanks are falling-off-the-bone tender, they are removed to a
platter and the sauce is thickened by reduction and adding flour. The
traditional accompaniment is risotto Milanese, but I usually just serve it
over plain rice and drink Chardonnay with it.

I have a detailed recipe for 6, but it's in jpeg format so I won't post it
here. E-mail me if you're interested, with osso buco in the subject line.
Remove dontspam from my address.

Tom S




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Old 27-03-2005, 02:52 AM
CabFan
 
Posts: n/a
Default

SNIP

Braised veal shanks. Typically rounds of veal with a marrow bone, done
in a stew of carrots, tomatoes, etc. The meat is delicate and tender
with great flavors. And, the best part is spreading the marrow on some
fine Italian bread. Often served with gnocci or polenta.

Personally, I go with Pinot Noir when I convince the wife to do Osso
Bucco, but I'll add that a light Valpolicella reminds me a lot of a
bright, cherry-oriented PN.

I never like Valpolicella very much until I discovered (typical
ignorant American, that I am) that Valpolicella in jug bottles is
about the same relationship to good Valpolicella as "chianti" is to
Chianti Classico. The "real thing" can be sublime.

Recently I got introduced to the rippasso style of Valpo, sort of a
second cousin to Amarone. These wines are big, warm, heavy and
certainly work well for me with almost any Italian cuisine.


Ed Rasimus


Ed,

Ripasso is actually made by pouring Valpolicella juice over the skins left
behind after Amarone is made so it is a sort-of "in-between" style. It's
always been interesting to me that they actually make 4 different styled
wines in Valpolicella from the same basic mix of grapes (those being
Valpolicella, Ripasso, Amarone and Recitto (spelling?))

Cheers,
Gary
  #12 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 27-03-2005, 02:52 AM
CabFan
 
Posts: n/a
Default

SNIP

Braised veal shanks. Typically rounds of veal with a marrow bone, done
in a stew of carrots, tomatoes, etc. The meat is delicate and tender
with great flavors. And, the best part is spreading the marrow on some
fine Italian bread. Often served with gnocci or polenta.

Personally, I go with Pinot Noir when I convince the wife to do Osso
Bucco, but I'll add that a light Valpolicella reminds me a lot of a
bright, cherry-oriented PN.

I never like Valpolicella very much until I discovered (typical
ignorant American, that I am) that Valpolicella in jug bottles is
about the same relationship to good Valpolicella as "chianti" is to
Chianti Classico. The "real thing" can be sublime.

Recently I got introduced to the rippasso style of Valpo, sort of a
second cousin to Amarone. These wines are big, warm, heavy and
certainly work well for me with almost any Italian cuisine.


Ed Rasimus


Ed,

Ripasso is actually made by pouring Valpolicella juice over the skins left
behind after Amarone is made so it is a sort-of "in-between" style. It's
always been interesting to me that they actually make 4 different styled
wines in Valpolicella from the same basic mix of grapes (those being
Valpolicella, Ripasso, Amarone and Recitto (spelling?))

Cheers,
Gary
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Old 27-03-2005, 10:16 AM
ferrante formato
 
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Default

The correct writing is Osso Buco = "Hollow Bone"




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Old 27-03-2005, 10:16 AM
ferrante formato
 
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Default

The correct writing is Osso Buco = "Hollow Bone"




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Old 27-03-2005, 07:24 PM
D. Gerasimatos
 
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Default

In article ,
Mike Tommasi wrote:

Agreed. A white is more usual with Osso Buco. And it is usually
accompanied by rice cooked with saffron (indeed risotto alla
Milanese), so all the more reason to do so. Chard sounds fine, but
Chenin would also be great.



Sounds weird to have white wine with veal. I usually have something
like syrah with osso buco. Isn't it too greasy for a white?!


Dimitri



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