Wine (alt.food.wine) Devoted to the discussion of wine and wine-related topics. A place to read and comment about wines, wine and food matching, storage systems, wine paraphernalia, etc. In general, any topic related to wine is valid fodder for the group.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 10-04-2018, 08:23 PM posted to alt.food.wine
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 36
Default Alsace Wine Label Question

Hi all. My wife and I just enjoyed a bottle of 2012 Domaine Ehrhart
Pinot Gris. Written on the label, under the line Pinot Gris and above
the line 2012, is IM BERG. What does that mean/signify? I know that
berg can usually mean town or village. But what is IM? Is that the
name of a village? Or does it mean something altogether different?

TIA,
Jack

  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 10-04-2018, 09:41 PM posted to alt.food.wine
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 2,849
Default Alsace Wine Label Question

On 4/10/18 3:23 PM, cruciverbalist wrote:
Hi all. My wife and I just enjoyed a bottle of 2012 Domaine Ehrhart
Pinot Gris. Written on the label, under the line Pinot Gris and above
the line 2012, is IM BERG. What does that mean/signify? I know that
berg can usually mean town or village. But what is IM? Is that the
name of a village? Or does it mean something altogether different?


"im" in German is short for "in dem" (in the), so "im Berg" means "in
the town"

HTH
Mark Lipton
--
alt.food.wine FAQ: http://winefaq.cwdjr.net
  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 10-04-2018, 10:06 PM posted to alt.food.wine
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 9
Default Alsace Wine Label Question

On 2018-04-10 21:23, cruciverbalist wrote:
Hi all. My wife and I just enjoyed a bottle of 2012 Domaine Ehrhart
Pinot Gris. Written on the label, under the line Pinot Gris and above
the line 2012, is IM BERG. What does that mean/signify? I know that
berg can usually mean town or village. But what is IM? Is that the
name of a village? Or does it mean something altogether different?


Quite a few "domaine Ehrhart", but it is quite probable that in any case
"Im Berg" is the name of a parcel without special ranking (meaning no
grand cru level)

"Im" is the contracted form of the German "in dem", i.e. "in the", and
"Berg" is mount, mountain, slope or anything similar, so not in the
(usually less favored) lower places in the valley

Town/village is "Burg"

Apologies for the wrong direct reply, I just found out about Thunderbird
now using "Followup" instead of "Reply" for newsgroups

--
Éric Lafontaine
  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 11-04-2018, 01:21 PM posted to alt.food.wine
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 36
Default Alsace Wine Label Question

On Tue, 10 Apr 2018 23:06:19 +0200, Eric Lafontaine
wrote:

On 2018-04-10 21:23, cruciverbalist wrote:
Hi all. My wife and I just enjoyed a bottle of 2012 Domaine Ehrhart
Pinot Gris. Written on the label, under the line Pinot Gris and above
the line 2012, is IM BERG. What does that mean/signify? I know that
berg can usually mean town or village. But what is IM? Is that the
name of a village? Or does it mean something altogether different?


Quite a few "domaine Ehrhart", but it is quite probable that in any case
"Im Berg" is the name of a parcel without special ranking (meaning no
grand cru level)

"Im" is the contracted form of the German "in dem", i.e. "in the", and
"Berg" is mount, mountain, slope or anything similar, so not in the
(usually less favored) lower places in the valley

Town/village is "Burg"

Apologies for the wrong direct reply, I just found out about Thunderbird
now using "Followup" instead of "Reply" for newsgroups


Thank you Mark and Eric for your replies.

Jack
  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 11-04-2018, 06:28 PM posted to alt.food.wine
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 2,849
Default Alsace Wine Label Question

On 4/10/18 5:06 PM, Eric Lafontaine wrote:

"Im" is the contracted form of the German "in dem", i.e. "in the", and
"Berg" is mount, mountain, slope or anything similar, so not in the
(usually less favored) lower places in the valley


In older German, Berg was also used to refer to walled towns and cities.
So, for instance, the old Prussian city of Königsberg (now Kaliningrad)
and Nuremberg, to name a few. Context is hey here. Vineyards are more
likely to planted on mountains rather than in walled cities (I wonder if
Berg might be the German equivalent of "Clos"?), but in that case I'd
expect to see "am Berg" rather than "im Berg." Prepositions are always
dicey to translate, though, so perhaps your reading is the most sensible.


Apologies for the wrong direct reply, I just found out about Thunderbird
now using "Followup" instead of "Reply" for newsgroups


Strangely, I did *exactly* the same thing.

Mark Lipton

--
alt.food.wine FAQ: http://winefaq.cwdjr.net


  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 11-04-2018, 08:43 PM posted to alt.food.wine
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 9
Default Alsace Wine Label Question

On 2018-04-11 19:28, Mark Lipton wrote:
On 4/10/18 5:06 PM, Eric Lafontaine wrote:

"Im" is the contracted form of the German "in dem", i.e. "in the", and
"Berg" is mount, mountain, slope or anything similar, so not in the
(usually less favored) lower places in the valley


In older German, Berg was also used to refer to walled towns and cities.
So, for instance, the old Prussian city of Königsberg (now Kaliningrad)
and Nuremberg, to name a few. Context is hey here. Vineyards are more
likely to planted on mountains rather than in walled cities (I wonder if
Berg might be the German equivalent of "Clos"?), but in that case I'd
expect to see "am Berg" rather than "im Berg." Prepositions are always
dicey to translate, though, so perhaps your reading is the most sensible.


It's been some 30 years since I actively practiced (contemporary)
German, but your am/im remark definitely makes a lot of sense, and your
reading is thus most probably the most sensible one.

Apologies for the wrong direct reply, I just found out about Thunderbird
now using "Followup" instead of "Reply" for newsgroups


Strangely, I did *exactly* the same thing.

Mark Lipton




--
Éric Lafontaine


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Italian label question Michael Pronay Wine 3 05-08-2007 09:43 AM
Need Help With Italian Wine Label cruciverbalist Wine 9 05-10-2006 01:25 PM
Wine label contest darp Winemaking 0 24-03-2005 01:50 AM
A nice wine label Bill Loftin Wine 5 28-02-2005 02:38 AM
Label question R-D-C Winemaking 6 17-12-2004 08:48 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 08:53 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2022 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Food and drink"

 

Copyright © 2017