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Old 21-04-2015, 04:38 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default Viognier


I had a 5E Trivento viognier Argentina for cooking and had a glass to taste what it is. No prior experience with viognier.

Was surprised to find that it reminds me of the nice fat body of a chardonnay. So maybe I should look into some higher quality viognier this summer.

What do you think? Am I right that it is somehow related to chardonnay? do they make nice reserves with some oak aging for "white red-like wines" like chardonnay?


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Old 22-04-2015, 05:22 AM posted to alt.food.wine
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Viognier?

Think Condrieu.

Some excellent examples from Australia and New Zealand - probably not in
your neck of the woods.

st.helier



"Michael Nielsen" wrote in message
...


I had a 5E Trivento viognier Argentina for cooking and had a glass to taste
what it is. No prior experience with viognier.

Was surprised to find that it reminds me of the nice fat body of a
chardonnay. So maybe I should look into some higher quality viognier this
summer.

What do you think? Am I right that it is somehow related to chardonnay? do
they make nice reserves with some oak aging for "white red-like wines" like
chardonnay?

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Old 22-04-2015, 07:52 AM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default Viognier

On Wednesday, April 22, 2015 at 6:22:37 AM UTC+2, st.helier wrote:
Viognier?

Think Condrieu.


"Often the wine is full bodied and rich in a style that is texturally similarly to Chardonnay."

So its not just me
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Old 23-04-2015, 04:41 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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In message
Michael Nielsen wrote:

On Wednesday, April 22, 2015 at 6:22:37 AM UTC+2, st.helier wrote:
Viognier?

Think Condrieu.


"Often the wine is full bodied and rich in a style that is texturally
similarly to Chardonnay."


So its not just me


But gentically it is related, according to ”Wine Grapes,• quite
closely and not surprisingly when one thinks Condrieu. to Syrah, as
well as to Mondeuse Blanche and, remotely through another variety, to
Nebbiolo.
There are some good ones at good value in the Ardeche as well.

Tim Hartley
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Old 24-04-2015, 10:59 AM posted to alt.food.wine
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On Tuesday, April 21, 2015 at 5:38:15 PM UTC+2, Michael Nielsen wrote:
Was surprised to find that it reminds me of the nice fat body of a chardonnay.


Surprised about the parallel with chardonnay, I do not see it.

For top quality wine, the grape is very picky about where it grows. In my experience, light and elegant with fine apricot citrusy aroma around Condrieu, heavy sickly syrupy anywhere else in Europe. Maybe in other continents?

Definitely appeals to the ladies. (not a sexist remark, just an observation)



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Old 24-04-2015, 07:20 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Mike Tommasi wrote in
:

Surprised about the parallel with chardonnay, I do not see it.


Neither do I.


For top quality wine, the grape is very picky about where it grows. In
my experience, light and elegant with fine apricot citrusy aroma
around Condrieu, heavy sickly syrupy anywhere else in Europe. Maybe in
other continents?



I normally find it cloying and too thick, without enough acidity. I
normally get bored with the second sip.

But I never had a White Rhone that I really liked (including Rayas white).



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Old 24-04-2015, 10:39 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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On Friday, April 24, 2015 at 8:20:21 PM UTC+2, santiago wrote:

I normally find it cloying and too thick, without enough acidity. I
normally get bored with the second sip.

But I never had a White Rhone that I really liked (including Rayas white).


Cloying and thick without acidity sounds wonderful. too bad the only condrieu I can find here is 70E. Not gonna try that. Id rather just get a trusty napa chard at 40E.
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Old 24-04-2015, 11:22 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Michael Nielsen said:


Cloying and thick without acidity sounds wonderful.



De gustibus non est disputandum !!!



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Old 25-04-2015, 11:31 AM posted to alt.food.wine
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On Saturday, April 25, 2015 at 12:22:38 AM UTC+2, santiago wrote:
Michael Nielsen said:


Cloying and thick without acidity sounds wonderful.



De gustibus non est disputandum !!!


yes one has the right to like unbalanced wines ;-)

White Rhone? St Joseph white can be great. Chateauneuf white from Domaine de la Janasse is very good. Lirac white frim Dom. de la Mordorée. But yes they are exceptions.
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Old 25-04-2015, 02:22 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Mike Tommasi wrote :

Chateauneuf white from
Domaine de la Janasse is very good.




Had it once... I liked it and was very happy to have put it in a taste with
friends. But I did not purchase more to drink or lay down for some time.




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Old 25-04-2015, 03:15 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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On 4/25/2015 9:22 AM, santiago wrote:
Mike Tommasi wrote :

Chateauneuf white from
Domaine de la Janasse is very good.




Had it once... I liked it and was very happy to have put it in a taste with
friends. But I did not purchase more to drink or lay down for some time.


I've not had much reason to say "Viognier" but it occurred to me find
its pronunciation today. From the web I find it's "vee ànn yáy", which
is easier than some of my attempts. I suppose "ànn" represents a French
nasal "O".

--
Jim Silverton (Potomac, MD)

Extraneous "not." in Reply To.
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Old 25-04-2015, 03:33 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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On Saturday, April 25, 2015 at 12:22:38 AM UTC+2, santiago wrote:

De gustibus non est disputandum !!!


Well, Im not into whites because of their lack of body and their high acid. So finding a type of white that has body and not acidic can only be a plus over the usual alternative
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Old 25-04-2015, 04:44 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Michael Nielsen wrote:


Well, Im not into whites because of their lack of body and their high
acid. So finding a type of white that has body and not acidic can only
be a plus over the usual alternative



Michael, when I said De gustibus... I really meant it!

No need to explain your preferences. I happen to like wines with acidity,
including whites and reds.

Let me suggest you try Rafa Palacios As Sortes 2010, 2011, or 2012 from
D.O. Valdeorras in Galice. Godello (the grape it is made from) is not very
acid and Rafa works very well with oak so the wine is full and rounded
without being cloying. It drinks so well at age 2 or 3.

It is not inexpensive, at around 30 euro retail in Spain. He makes a second
wine called Louro which is also nice, but a step down in all magnitudes
(intensity, volume, etc). And beware that 2013 was a very difficult year in
the area.



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Old 25-04-2015, 06:31 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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On 25/04/2015 8:15 AM, James Silverton wrote:
On 4/25/2015 9:22 AM, santiago wrote:
Mike Tommasi wrote :

Chateauneuf white from
Domaine de la Janasse is very good.




Had it once... I liked it and was very happy to have put it in a taste
with
friends. But I did not purchase more to drink or lay down for some time.


I've not had much reason to say "Viognier" but it occurred to me find
its pronunciation today. From the web I find it's "vee ànn yáy", which
is easier than some of my attempts. I suppose "ànn" represents a French
nasal "O".

It's the short "O" sound not Viownyay or Vyownyay.
It seems to be an ignorant, middle class affectation to lengthen vowel
sounds. Risotto becomes "rizoatoh" and I don't know where Coasta Rica is:-)

--
"It is a truism that almost any sect, cult, or religion
will legislate its creed into law if it acquires the
political power to do so."
Sir Arthur C. Clark



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Old 25-04-2015, 06:42 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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On 4/25/2015 1:31 PM, graham wrote:
On 25/04/2015 8:15 AM, James Silverton wrote:
On 4/25/2015 9:22 AM, santiago wrote:
Mike Tommasi wrote :

Chateauneuf white from
Domaine de la Janasse is very good.



Had it once... I liked it and was very happy to have put it in a taste
with
friends. But I did not purchase more to drink or lay down for some time.


I've not had much reason to say "Viognier" but it occurred to me find
its pronunciation today. From the web I find it's "vee ànn yáy", which
is easier than some of my attempts. I suppose "ànn" represents a French
nasal "O".

It's the short "O" sound not Viownyay or Vyownyay.
It seems to be an ignorant, middle class affectation to lengthen vowel
sounds. Risotto becomes "rizoatoh" and I don't know where Coasta Rica is:-)

I was avoiding ASCII IPA and thus "O" just represents the letter "o" but
it would be short like you say.

--
Jim Silverton (Potomac, MD)

Extraneous "not." in Reply To.


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