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Michael Nielsen[_4_] 23-01-2015 08:51 AM

Chateau Larose-Trintaudon Haut-Medoc 2007
 
Chateau Larose-Trintaudon Haut-Medoc 2007 ***

First time I buy a cheap french wine in a supermarket in many years paid off. I was shopping and saw this one for 16E, and I felt adventurous. Haut Medoc/Paulliac are my favourite french regions, so there was a chance I'd like it, while I didnt expect much since I never had one in a supermarket that was good. It was a dark fruity with mineral, but very smooth, lacking some texture (that could have given it 4 stars). Not as acidic and thin as french wine often is.



Pictu

http://www.wiredforwine.com/featured...doc-2009-91pts

Sheila Page[_2_] 23-01-2015 04:49 PM

Chateau Larose-Trintaudon Haut-Medoc 2007
 
In message ,
Michael Nielsen writes
Chateau Larose-Trintaudon Haut-Medoc 2007 ***

First time I buy a cheap french wine in a supermarket in many years
paid off. I was shopping and saw this one for 16E, and I felt
adventurous. Haut Medoc/Paulliac are my favourite french regions, so
there was a chance I'd like it, while I didnt expect much since I never
had one in a supermarket that was good. It was a dark fruity with
mineral, but very smooth, lacking some texture (that could have given
it 4 stars). Not as acidic and thin as french wine often is.



Pictu

http://www.wiredforwine.com/featured...rintaudon-haut
-medoc-2009-91pts


I am glad to hear it is still a reliable supermarket wine: many years
ago when I had regular trips to/from Brussels from London (and you could
still bring back an arm full of bottles), this was a standby from the
supermarket near the North station

Sheila
--
---
Sheila Page

santiago 23-01-2015 08:46 PM

Chateau Larose-Trintaudon Haut-Medoc 2007
 
Michael Nielsen wrote in
:

Chateau Larose-Trintaudon Haut-Medoc 2007 ***

First time I buy a cheap french wine in a supermarket in many years
paid off. I was shopping and saw this one for 16E, and I felt
adventurous. Haut Medoc/Paulliac


Pauillac, you mean ;)

are my favourite french regions, so
there was a chance I'd like it, while I didnt expect much since I
never had one in a supermarket that was good. It was a dark fruity
with mineral, but very smooth, lacking some texture (that could have
given it 4 stars). Not as acidic and thin as french wine often is.



Pictu

http://www.wiredforwine.com/featured...trintaudon-hau
t-medoc-2009-91pts


But was it 2007 or 2009? Very (very) different vintages. 2007 is a very
weak vintage, with plenty of diluted wines, and if you dislike french wines
for being "thin and acidic" this is the kind of Bordeaux vintage to avoid.

2009, on the other hand is an exhuberant, very ripe vintage for Bordeaux,
specially on the right bank. Saint-Emilion 2009 is not thin and acidic, you
can take that for granted. Try Sansonnet 2009 and tell me if you think this
is thin big grin


For what is worth, considering french wine as thin and acidic is quite
unfair, since France is quite a large country with a high diversity of
terroirs. You cannot compare a red from Anjou and one from Languedoc-
Roussillon.

If you like riper reds, I think you should concentrate on Saint Emilion in
Bordeaux, and then the wines closer to the Mediterranean Sea: Languedoc
Roussillon, Rhone Sud, Provence...

A hint: Domaine de la Janasse Vin de Pays de la Principauté d'Orange "Terre
de Bussiere". A wine of 12 euros that tastes as a wine of 25 euros. And it
is clearly ripe (which is the style of Janasse). If you find Janasse thin
and acidic, then clearly french wine is not for you.


Michael Nielsen[_4_] 24-01-2015 12:12 AM

Chateau Larose-Trintaudon Haut-Medoc 2007
 
On Friday, January 23, 2015 at 9:46:35 PM UTC+1, santiago wrote:

But was it 2007 or 2009? Very (very) different vintages. 2007 is a very
weak vintage, with plenty of diluted wines, and if you dislike french wines
for being "thin and acidic" this is the kind of Bordeaux vintage to avoid..


It is actually 2007. Seems this winemaker held the fort during this vintage..


For what is worth, considering french wine as thin and acidic is quite
unfair, since France is quite a large country with a high diversity of
terroirs. You cannot compare a red from Anjou and one from Languedoc-
Roussillon.


Not familiar with those. I know a Côtes de Castillon 20E chat. de gasparde prestige I like, as it has the right notes, but still a bit thin, hahah, but then I tried other wines from that region and they were not good.

If you like riper reds, I think you should concentrate on Saint Emilion in
Bordeaux,


I've had some saint emilions before. Also some fancy primier cru that the store was so proud of. Horrible. Thin and acidic,yes. its how I got that idea that thats how french wine is, together with burgundy. Rhone is different..


and then the wines closer to the Mediterranean Sea: Languedoc
Roussillon, Rhone Sud, Provence...


I think it is mostly nothern rhone I like. Syrah driven. cotes du rhone and du pape is not my thing. Or is north/south vice versa? I used to like cotes du rhone, but my taste changed a bit. I can still find some I like, but it is probably one bottle per 2 years I get. Never was satisfied with a chat.. du pape (that's the kind of 40E wine I regret buying - Im much more satisfied with a 100E napa rutherford cab (price in california) or a 100E supertuscan (price in italy). I havent tasted a 100E du pape, so maybe Id like that, but Im not going to risk that unless I have a chance to taste one so I know I would like it).

A hint: Domaine de la Janasse Vin de Pays de la Principauté d'Orange "Terre
de Bussiere". A wine of 12 euros that tastes as a wine of 25 euros. And it
is clearly ripe (which is the style of Janasse). If you find Janasse thin
and acidic, then clearly french wine is not for you.


its 10E here, reviews are happy about it. they do mention a funny thing in the notes: "ox blood". LAst time I was in my fav. wine store, we were talking about my taste and that I think french wine has a tendency to taste like veal blood (and more acid and thinner than Im used to in my fav. wines). He also noted that the bourdeuax wines I prefer have more cabernet then merlot, and those I dont like have more merlot.

and behold, speaking of saint emilion: "the primary grape varieties used are the Merlot and Cabernet Franc, with relatively small amounts of Cabernet Sauvignon also being used by some chteaux."

santiago 24-01-2015 10:52 AM

Chateau Larose-Trintaudon Haut-Medoc 2007
 
Michael Nielsen wrote in
:

I've had some saint emilions before. Also some fancy primier cru that
the store was so proud of. Horrible. Thin and acidic,yes. its how I
got that idea that thats how french wine is, together with burgundy.
Rhone is different.


In Saint Emilion the base AOC is Saint Emilion Grand Cru. That's mostly
plonk (with exceptions to be found).

Upper level is Saint Emilion Grand Cru Classé. This is better.

Then you have Premier Grand Cru Classé A and B. Only a handful. All of
them ultra-uber-premium.





and then the wines closer to the Mediterranean Sea: Languedoc
Roussillon, Rhone Sud, Provence...


I think it is mostly nothern rhone I like. Syrah driven. cotes du
rhone and du pape is not my thing. Or is north/south vice versa? I
used to like cotes du rhone, but my taste changed a bit. I can still
find some I like, but it is probably one bottle per 2 years I get.
Never was satisfied with a chat. du pape (that's the kind of 40E wine
I regret buying - Im much more satisfied with a 100E napa rutherford
cab (price in california) or a 100E supertuscan (price in italy). I
havent tasted a 100E du pape, so maybe Id like that, but Im not going
to risk that unless I have a chance to taste one so I know I would
like it).


Over simplicating:
Northern Rhone = Syrah (Cornas, Saint Joseph...)
Souther Rhone = Grenache and others. (Chateaneauf du Pape...)

Cotes du Rhone is too big of an AOC and wines can come from everywhere
in the Rhone. Try to find producers making Cotes du Rhone mostly with
Syrah and not with Grenache in the blend.



its 10E here, reviews are happy about it. they do mention a funny
thing in the notes: "ox blood".


If you do not like Merlot, avoid the Janasse Terre de Bussiere, since
there is quite a proportion of Merlot in the blend.

LAst time I was in my fav. wine store,
we were talking about my taste and that I think french wine has a
tendency to taste like veal blood (and more acid and thinner than Im
used to in my fav. wines). He also noted that the bourdeuax wines I
prefer have more cabernet then merlot, and those I dont like have more
merlot.


Which is interesting because in Bordeaux, wines made primarily with
Cabernet Sauvignon are thinner and more acid than the average Merlot
wines and you are supposed to prefer bolder wines.

My guess is that you just love Syrah and Cabernet wines, which can make
sense if you grew your appreciation for red wines in California (Napa,
etc).

You should concentrate on wines from those grapes.


Emery Davis` 24-01-2015 11:05 AM

Chateau Larose-Trintaudon Haut-Medoc 2007
 
On Fri, 23 Jan 2015 16:12:30 -0800, Michael Nielsen wrote:

On Friday, January 23, 2015 at 9:46:35 PM UTC+1, santiago wrote:

But was it 2007 or 2009? Very (very) different vintages. 2007 is a very
weak vintage, with plenty of diluted wines, and if you dislike french
wines for being "thin and acidic" this is the kind of Bordeaux vintage
to avoid.


It is actually 2007. Seems this winemaker held the fort during this
vintage.

There were good wines made in 07, just a lot more difficult that 09. And
of course it would not be possible to make a wine of the 09 standard in
07. Anyway LT is a modern styled wine that I find reliable and OK at the
price (which is certainly not cheap!)

For what is worth, considering french wine as thin and acidic is quite
unfair, since France is quite a large country with a high diversity of
terroirs. You cannot compare a red from Anjou and one from Languedoc-
Roussillon.


Not familiar with those. I know a Côtes de Castillon 20E chat. de
gasparde prestige I like, as it has the right notes, but still a bit
thin, hahah, but then I tried other wines from that region and they were
not good.


As Santiago says, France has many different wine regions and the
character of them, like the grapes used, is very different. FWIW Cotes
de Castillon is also made often mostly from Merlot, though both Cabernet
Franc and Cabernet Sauvignon are also authorized as principle grapes.
(The secondary varieties are Carmenere, cot and petit verdot for reds).
The one you like may have more cabernet sauvignon, but most of the time
these wines are built to be lesser cousins to St. Emilion. BTW 20 EU is
quite expensive for a castillon.

If you like riper reds, I think you should concentrate on Saint Emilion
in Bordeaux,


I've had some saint emilions before. Also some fancy primier cru that
the store was so proud of. Horrible. Thin and acidic,yes. its how I got


Since you don't like merlot, don't waste your money on St. Emilion. More
for the rest of us! ;)

[]

A lot of wine from the southern Rhone is made to drink quickly and
doesn't have much of the tannins that you like. Oddly where you might
find success is in some of the IGP (used to be VDQS or vin de pays). For
example the "Principauté d'Orange" is sometimes grown on similar or
identical land where Chateauneuf du Pape is made, (though it can come
from much further north also) and made from high percentages of ripe,
tannic syrah. But since there are many more varieties authorized than in
an AOP wine, you have to step a little carefully if your tastes are
narrowly defined.

Another area that might interest you is the south west, Madiran or some
Cahors that are built with a huge amount of tannins (from the Tannat
grape, you can guess how it got its name).

-E

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Michael Nielsen[_4_] 24-01-2015 04:07 PM

Chateau Larose-Trintaudon Haut-Medoc 2007
 

As Santiago says, France has many different wine regions and the
character of them, like the grapes used, is very different. FWIW Cotes
de Castillon is also made often mostly from Merlot, though both Cabernet
Franc and Cabernet Sauvignon are also authorized as principle grapes.


I checked and it is actually merlot. So its an oddball castillon I guess. AS I mentioned, after liking it, I checked out more castillon to no luck, concluded that its just that particular wine I like. gasparde makes a "little brother" at 12E and its very thin and acidic (below my threshold for considering a wine to be real wine.).

This one, check it out if you can find it:

http://www.wine-searcher.com/wine-19...stillon-france

When first opening it, it tastes quite cheap (thin and acidic, almost sparkly soda pop like) but after airing, texture, earthiness and dark disovled berry as I like it comes out.

BTW 20 EU is
quite expensive for a castillon.


Well its the big brother edition.


Another area that might interest you is the south west, Madiran or some
Cahors that are built with a huge amount of tannins (from the Tannat
grape, you can guess how it got its name).


Ive had one madiran before that I found on sale for 16E down from 22E. I liked it. Dont remember which one and its not available anymore. was a kinda small and simple label.

I've had a cahors tasting at my wine club where they had a lot of prince of denmark wines that were all horrible. 70E wine vinegar. Their was a malbec called the "the real malbec" that was the best one at the tasting and it was only 12E. The guy who made hte tasting was not pleased with my review so he convinced me to try another producer from cahors, as he knows my taste is very particular, Rigal:

http://www.malbec-wines.com/2.cfm?p=...-didier-parnac

And it was very very nice.


The danish prince has the winery Chat. de Cayx.



Michael Nielsen[_4_] 24-01-2015 04:20 PM

Chateau Larose-Trintaudon Haut-Medoc 2007
 
On Saturday, January 24, 2015 at 11:52:38 AM UTC+1, santiago wrote:
In Saint Emilion the base AOC is Saint Emilion Grand Cru. That's mostly
plonk (with exceptions to be found).

Upper level is Saint Emilion Grand Cru Classé. This is better.

Then you have Premier Grand Cru Classé A and B. Only a handful. All of
them ultra-uber-premium.


Ive had Grand Cru, Grand Cru Classe as well as Primier Grand Cru (dont remember if it was A or B). None of them is something I'd like to buy. Granted, it might have been too young. But I've had current release Pingus and Chat.. Latour (both being 800E per bottle)(But that cab driven pauillac) that even being young was amazing. I did evaluate Flor de Pingus to be the best value at that tasting at 100E per bottle. I think I never bought anything more expensive than 120E per bottle, and I doubt I ever will.




Over simplicating:
Northern Rhone = Syrah (Cornas, Saint Joseph...)
Souther Rhone = Grenache and others. (Chateaneauf du Pape...)

Cotes du Rhone is too big of an AOC and wines can come from everywhere
in the Rhone. Try to find producers making Cotes du Rhone mostly with
Syrah and not with Grenache in the blend.



Grenache is on my "cheap " list. when getting sub-10E wines, grenache can be fine. Along with Zinfandel and Malbec, and Valdepenas Gran Reserva ( I got one today Diego G.R. for 6E!). I think its just that I dont think all types of wine benefit as much from being made more premium as other types. I think cabs grow with the price range. Zinfandel doesnt really improve much through the price ranges in my opinion.

Which is interesting because in Bordeaux, wines made primarily with
Cabernet Sauvignon are thinner and more acid than the average Merlot
wines and you are supposed to prefer bolder wines.



And as Ive been saying, most of it is really too thin and acidic :)

But cab-driven blends can be made to be bold, rough textured and earthy as I like it.

My guess is that you just love Syrah and Cabernet wines, which can make
sense if you grew your appreciation for red wines in California (Napa,
etc).

You should concentrate on wines from those grapes.


The wines that got me into wine loving was classic rioja Gran reserva (was a tasting with Martinez Bujanda Crianza, Reserva, and G.R.- unlucky for me it was G.R. that opened my eyes to what wine can really e. Crianza was "meh", Reserva had some of the right stuff, but was too thin, G.R. was just right) :)

Wine touring Napa extended on that even further.

santiago 24-01-2015 09:08 PM

Chateau Larose-Trintaudon Haut-Medoc 2007
 
Michael Nielsen wrote in
:

Ive had one madiran before that I found on sale for 16E down from 22E.
I liked it. Dont remember which one and its not available anymore. was
a kinda small and simple label.


In Madiran there are two very interesting names that I have drank with
delight: Domaine Berthomieu, specially in the Cuvée Charles de Batz, and
Chateau Montus.

I tasted Montus 2009 at a recent tasting and loved it. Showed up in Vente à
la Proprieté a few weeks later and got a case. It is built for the long
term, and priced below 20 euro.

I even got a bottle of the 2004 at a local merchant around the corner. Not
as good as the 2009 but also at 20 euro a very good drink, with plenty of
tannin and the dusty character you seem to like.

s.

Michael Nielsen[_4_] 24-01-2015 11:30 PM

Chateau Larose-Trintaudon Haut-Medoc 2007
 
On Saturday, January 24, 2015 at 10:08:50 PM UTC+1, santiago wrote:
I even got a bottle of the 2004 at a local merchant around the corner. Not
as good as the 2009 but also at 20 euro a very good drink, with plenty of
tannin and the dusty character you seem to like.


Madiran is scarce here. Checked montus and I see news about it in site:dk, but no place that sells, except a german based website.

I remember you like Montesa REserva black label.

I found I have one more in my collection, and it is from 2001. Cellartracker has no life expectancy on that one, what do you think?

2001 Palacios Remondo Rioja La Montesa Reserva

santiago 25-01-2015 08:54 AM

Chateau Larose-Trintaudon Haut-Medoc 2007
 
Michael Nielsen wrote in
:

I found I have one more in my collection, and it is from 2001.
Cellartracker has no life expectancy on that one, what do you think?

2001 Palacios Remondo Rioja La Montesa Reserva


It was very good 3 years ago. And it was drinking at peak in my opinion, so
it should be good still.





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