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Old 22-05-2012, 07:42 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default [FAQ] Revised Section 3t. New Zealand?

Although history will show that the first grapes were planted by English
settlers in the early 1800s, the modern history of the NZ wine industry
started with the planting of Vitis Vinifera grapes in the late 1960s to
early 1970's. However, it was the release of Cloudy Bay's 1985
(Marlborough) Sauvignon Blanc that first placed NZ on the world's
winemaking map.
In the fifteen years since 1997 , NZ wine industry has undergone a
period of spectacular development. In 1997 there were less than 7,000
hectares under vine: by the end of 2011 the national total was more than
33,600 hectares – some 56% of those planting in Marlborough.
Today, there are some 700 wineries - it should be noted that 600 are
smaller producers (less than 20,000 cases per year). Marlborough
Sauvignon Blanc accounts for over 50% of NZs annual wine production,
while Pinot Noir (both volume and quality) has improved greatly in the
past five years. Some excellent examples of Riesling, Pinot Gris, Syrah
are to be found – and do not be surprised to find some gorgeous
Gewürztraminer, vivacious Viognier, beautiful Bordeaux blends as well as
the occasional Arneis; Chenin Blanc; Grüner Veltliner; Pinot Blanc;
Malbec; Montepulciano; Sangiovese or Tempranillo.
Since 2007 there has been a strong commitment to both, sustainable
production in vineyards and wineries, and organic programmes. It is
estimated that over 94% of the producing vineyard area is participating
in the Sustainable Winegrowing New Zealand (SWNZ) initiative and a
further 3-5% is producing under certified organic programmes.
Participation in organic production is anticipated to continue to
increase over the next decade in all likelihood reaching 20% by 2020.
Despite the distances involved, New Zealand is truly an excellent wine
destination.
Auckland International is about 26 hours from London Heathrow; 13 hours
direct from LAX and 3-3.5 from Australia’s east coast.
International travellers will typically arrive early in the morning, so
plan on taking the rest of the day to rest and recuperate, although
there are a few wineries based in and around Auckland city (and Waiheke
Island) to visit.
Owing to a lack of suitable public transport (servicing wine-making
regions) driving is virtually the only option available to the intrepid
visitor. IMPORTANT NOTE: DRIVING IS ON THE LEFT and speed limits are
rigorously monitored with speed cameras.
In Auckland, Hawkes Bay & Marlborough mini-bus wine tours are available
(generally only on weekends). Rental cars are plentiful and inexpensive
– Google search and reserve on-line.
NZ comprises two main islands, both of which contain several winemaking
regions. From the far north to Central Otago stretches 1,000 miles
(1,600km) - so a tour can take as little as four / five days (Hawkes Bay
/ Marlborough) or a couple of weeks.
The main wine regions in the North Island are Hawke's Bay (Syrah,
Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, and Chardonnay) and Martinborough (Pinot
Noir, Chardonnay and Pinot Gris); while Marlborough (Sauvignon Blanc,
Riesling & Pinot Noir) and Central Otago (Pinot Noir, Riesling & Pinot
Gris) are the key areas on the South Island. The most popular mode of
accommodation is the (self contained) Motel; however, a range of hotels,
B&Bs etc are available around the country. Reservations, while
recommended, are mandatory only during peak holiday seasons (December -
February). Many wineries do not have visitor facilities; those that do
welcome visitors, generally without reservation. Tasting is normally
free (those that do charge will refund off purchase). Respectfully, it
is suggested that a phone call explaining that you are an overseas
visitor may pay dividends, with a private tour and chat to the
winemaker. Point out that you may not be purchasing - this is acceptable
in the case of an overseas visitor - you will still get an A1 reception.

NORTH ISLAND

HAWKES BAY: A comfortable drive four hour drive from Auckland, through
the thermal region of Rotorua. Stay on Napier’s waterfront, where the
architecture is distinctly Art Deco, owing to the rebuild of the city
following a major earthquake in 1931. Drive to the top of Te Mata peak
for spectacular views of the area.

Wineries:
Church Road Wines: Pernod Ricard's Hawkes Bay HQ, al fresco Lunches, museum
C J Pask Wines: Syrah
Craggy Range: Showcase winery. Stunning Syrah.
Esk Valley Wines: High quality Bordeaux blends. The Terraces (Malbec) is
iconic.
Sileni Estates: Epicurean Centre (Carefully matched cheese & wine
tasting); Olive oils.
Stonecroft Wines: Excellent Syrah, Gewürztraminer and Chardonnay
Te Mata Estate: Iconic NZ Cabernet/Merlot (Coleraine). Not so much a
visit as a pilgrimage.
Trinity Hill – One of NZs finest Syrahs (Homage)

Dining:
Brookfield Vineyards - Luncheon restaurant
Clearview Estate - al fresco dining near the sea.
Craggy Range - Restaurant

MARTINBOROUGH: A little over an hours drive north of Wellington,
boutique wineries abound. Pinot capital of NZ.

Wineries:
Ata Rangi: Top class Pinot Noir, Pinot Gris
Martinborough Vineyards: Classy Pinot Noir, Chardonnay, Riesling
Dry River: True legend - Cellar door by appointment – Pinot Noir, Pinot
Gris, Gewürztraminer all icons.
Palliser Estate: Pinot Noir, Pinot Gris, very good Sauvignon Blanc
Murdoch James Estate: Organic Pinot Noir.

Dining:
Murdoch James Estate: Café lunches.

Lodging:
Murdoch James Estate: Original farmhouse cottage – self contained.



SOUTH ISLAND

MARLBOROUGH: While being the spiritual home of Sauvignon Blanc,
Marlborough offers some special fine dining experiences. If you have
“done” the North Island first, take the three hour ferry trip from
Wellington – the difference between the two islands is amazing.

Wineries:
Allan Scott Wines: Excellent white wines; courtyard lunch venue.
Cloudy Bay: Iconic Sauvignon Blanc. A must visit.
Highfield Estate & Restaurant: Very nice bubbles
Johanneshof Cellars: NZs most awarded Gewürztraminer
Lawson's Dry Hills Wines: Very good Sauvignon Blanc & Gewürztraminer
Pernod Ricard Visitor Cent Restaurant, retail store, tasting rooms
and wine education facility.
Villa Maria Marlborough Winery: Large visitor centre
Wairau River Wines: Ageworthy Sauvignon Blanc
Wither Hills: Sauvignon Blanc, Pinot Gris.

Dining:
Allan Scott Wines: Vineyard Restaurant
Herzog Winery & Restaurant: Best winery restaurant in NZ – prepare to
indulge.
Herzog Cellar Door Bistro: Casual lunches in garden environment
Highfield Estate & Restaurant
Saint Clair Estate Wines: Café lunches.
Wairau River Wines: Good winery restaurant

Lodging:
Hans Herzog Vineyard Cottage – on the estate.

CANTERBURY: The recent earthquakes may have devastated the city of
Christchurch, but the coastal drive south from Marlborough is
magnificent. Stop for crayfish (NZ rock lobster) in Kaikoura – and make
the left turn to Pegasus Bay.

Wineries:
Bell Hill Vineyard: By appointment only; highly rated Chardonnay and
Pinot Noir
Mud House Winery & Café: Classy Sauvignon Blanc producer (Marlborough)
Pegasus Bay: Canterbury’s top winery - Excellent Riesling, Pinot Noir,
Chardonnay
Pyramid Valley: very good Pinot Noir and other interesting wines

Dining:
Pegasus Bay: Top rated winery restaurant


CENTRAL OTAGO: The nearest NZ has to a continental climate. Adventure
capital of the world! Vying with Martinborough as Pinot paradise. Winter
is for skiers, while autumn (late April), simply a kaleidoscope of
colour in the valleys and villages around the mountains and lakes, is
best time to visit.

Wineries:
Amisfield Wine Company: Classy Pinot Noir
Felton Road Wines: Top notch bio-dynamic producer of Pinot Noir,
Riesling and Chardonnay.
Gibbston Valley: Tourist centre – wines include Pinot Noir, Chardonnay
Mt. Difficulty: Pinot Noir, Pinot Gris, Riesling.
Quartz Reef: Impressive Traditional Method sparkling, Pinot Gris
Peregrine Wines: Stunning architecture – Pinot Noir; Riesling.

Dining:
Amisfield Bistro: Lunch and early dinner
Gibbston Valley: Winery restaurant & cheesery
Mt. Difficulty Wines: Restaurant open for lunches.


Good references:

Cuisine Magazine http://cuisine.co.nz/
Michael Cooper’s Wine Atlas http://www.michaelcooper.co.nz/
NZ Wine (On-line reference) http://www.nzwine.com/
NZ.COM website http://www.nzwine.com/


--
alt.food.wine FAQ: http://winefaq.cwdjr.net

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Old 23-05-2012, 11:20 AM posted to alt.food.wine
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Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 912
Default Revised Section 3t. New Zealand?

I am writing the code to replace the old NZ section with the new one
on the FAQ site. It should be ready within a few days. I will first
send a url for it to Mark Lipton. After then making any needed
revisions, I will replace the NZ section of the FAQ site with the new
one and post here when it is available online.
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Old 23-05-2012, 04:56 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 408
Default Revised Section 3t. New Zealand?

On May 22, 12:42*pm, Mark Lipton wrote:
Although history will show that the first grapes were planted by English
settlers in the early 1800s, the modern history of the NZ wine industry
started with the planting of Vitis Vinifera *grapes in the late 1960s to
early 1970's. However, it was the release of Cloudy Bay's 1985
(Marlborough) Sauvignon Blanc that first placed NZ on the world's
winemaking map.
In the fifteen years since 1997 , NZ wine industry has undergone a
period of spectacular development. In 1997 there were less than 7,000
hectares under vine: by the end of 2011 the national total was more than
33,600 hectares – some 56% of those planting in Marlborough.
Today, there are some 700 wineries - it should be noted that 600 are
smaller producers (less than 20,000 cases per year). Marlborough
Sauvignon Blanc accounts for over 50% of NZs annual wine production,
while Pinot Noir (both volume and quality) has improved greatly in the
past five years. Some excellent examples of Riesling, Pinot Gris, Syrah
are to be found – and do not be surprised to find some gorgeous
Gewürztraminer, vivacious Viognier, beautiful Bordeaux blends as well as
the occasional Arneis; Chenin Blanc; Grüner Veltliner; Pinot Blanc;
Malbec; Montepulciano; Sangiovese or Tempranillo.
Since 2007 there has been a strong commitment to both, sustainable
production in vineyards and wineries, and organic programmes. It is
estimated that over 94% of the producing vineyard area is participating
in the Sustainable Winegrowing New Zealand (SWNZ) initiative and a
further 3-5% is producing under certified organic programmes.
Participation in organic production is anticipated to continue to
increase over the next decade in all likelihood reaching 20% by 2020.
*Despite the distances involved, New Zealand is truly an excellent wine
destination.
Auckland International is about 26 hours from London Heathrow; 13 hours
direct from LAX and 3-3.5 from Australia’s east coast.
International travellers will typically arrive early in the morning, so
plan on taking the rest of the day to rest and recuperate, although
there are a few wineries based in and around Auckland city (and Waiheke
Island) to visit.
Owing to a lack of suitable public transport (servicing wine-making
regions) driving is virtually the only option available to the intrepid
visitor. IMPORTANT NOTE: DRIVING IS ON THE LEFT and speed limits are
rigorously monitored with speed cameras.
In Auckland, Hawkes Bay & Marlborough mini-bus wine tours are available
(generally only on weekends). Rental cars are plentiful and inexpensive
– Google search and reserve on-line.
NZ comprises two main islands, both of which contain several winemaking
regions. From the far north to Central Otago stretches 1,000 miles
(1,600km) - so a tour can take as little as four / five days (Hawkes Bay
/ Marlborough) or a couple of weeks.
The main wine regions in the North Island are Hawke's Bay (Syrah,
Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, and Chardonnay) and Martinborough (Pinot
Noir, Chardonnay and Pinot Gris); while Marlborough (Sauvignon Blanc,
Riesling & Pinot Noir) and Central Otago (Pinot Noir, Riesling & Pinot
Gris) are the key areas on the South Island. The most popular mode of
accommodation is the (self contained) Motel; however, a range of hotels,
B&Bs etc are available around the country. Reservations, while
recommended, are mandatory only during peak holiday seasons (December -
February). Many wineries do not have visitor facilities; those that do
welcome visitors, generally without reservation. Tasting is normally
free (those that do charge will refund off purchase). Respectfully, it
is suggested that a phone call explaining that you are an overseas
visitor may pay dividends, with a private tour and chat to the
winemaker. Point out that you may not be purchasing - this is acceptable
in the case of an overseas visitor - you will still get an A1 reception.

NORTH ISLAND

HAWKES BAY: *A comfortable drive four hour drive from Auckland, through
the thermal region of Rotorua. Stay on Napier’s waterfront, where the
architecture is distinctly Art Deco, owing to the rebuild of the city
following a major earthquake in 1931. Drive to the top of Te Mata peak
for spectacular views of the area.

Wineries:
Church Road Wines: Pernod Ricard's Hawkes Bay HQ, al fresco Lunches, museum
C J Pask Wines: Syrah
Craggy Range: Showcase winery. Stunning Syrah.
Esk Valley Wines: High quality Bordeaux blends. The Terraces (Malbec) is
iconic.
Sileni Estates: Epicurean Centre (Carefully matched cheese & wine
tasting); Olive oils.
Stonecroft Wines: Excellent Syrah, Gewürztraminer and Chardonnay
Te Mata Estate: Iconic NZ Cabernet/Merlot *(Coleraine). *Not so much a
visit as a pilgrimage.
Trinity Hill – One of NZs finest Syrahs (Homage)

Dining:
Brookfield Vineyards - Luncheon restaurant
Clearview Estate - al fresco dining near the sea.
Craggy Range - Restaurant

MARTINBOROUGH: A little over an hours drive north of Wellington,
boutique wineries abound. Pinot capital of NZ.

Wineries:
Ata Rangi: Top class Pinot Noir, Pinot Gris
Martinborough Vineyards: Classy Pinot Noir, Chardonnay, Riesling
Dry River: True legend - Cellar door by appointment – Pinot Noir, Pinot
Gris, Gewürztraminer all icons.
Palliser Estate: Pinot Noir, Pinot Gris, very good Sauvignon Blanc
Murdoch James Estate: Organic Pinot Noir.

Dining:
Murdoch James Estate: Café lunches.

Lodging:
Murdoch James Estate: Original farmhouse cottage – self contained.

SOUTH ISLAND

MARLBOROUGH: While being the spiritual home of Sauvignon Blanc,
Marlborough offers some special fine dining experiences. If you have
“done” the North Island first, take the three hour ferry trip from
Wellington – the difference between the two islands is amazing.

Wineries:
Allan Scott Wines: *Excellent white wines; courtyard lunch venue.
Cloudy Bay: Iconic Sauvignon Blanc. A must visit.
Highfield Estate & Restaurant: Very nice bubbles
Johanneshof Cellars: NZs most awarded Gewürztraminer
Lawson's Dry Hills Wines: Very good Sauvignon Blanc & Gewürztraminer
Pernod Ricard Visitor Cent Restaurant, retail store, tasting rooms
and wine education facility.
Villa Maria Marlborough Winery: Large visitor centre
Wairau River Wines: Ageworthy Sauvignon Blanc
Wither Hills: Sauvignon Blanc, Pinot Gris.

Dining:
Allan Scott Wines: Vineyard Restaurant
Herzog Winery & Restaurant: Best winery restaurant in NZ – prepare to
indulge.
Herzog Cellar Door Bistro: Casual lunches in garden environment
Highfield Estate & Restaurant
Saint Clair Estate Wines: Café lunches.
Wairau River Wines: Good winery restaurant

Lodging:
Hans Herzog Vineyard Cottage – on the estate.

CANTERBURY: The recent earthquakes may have devastated the city of
Christchurch, but the coastal drive south from Marlborough is
magnificent. Stop for crayfish (NZ rock lobster) in Kaikoura – and make
the left turn to Pegasus Bay.

Wineries:
Bell Hill Vineyard: By appointment only; highly rated Chardonnay and
Pinot Noir
Mud House Winery & Café: Classy Sauvignon Blanc producer (Marlborough)
Pegasus Bay: Canterbury’s top winery - Excellent Riesling, Pinot Noir,
Chardonnay
Pyramid Valley: very good Pinot Noir and other interesting wines

Dining:
Pegasus Bay: Top rated winery restaurant

CENTRAL OTAGO: The nearest NZ has to a continental climate. Adventure
capital of the world! Vying with Martinborough as Pinot paradise. Winter
is for skiers, while autumn (late April), simply a kaleidoscope of
colour in the valleys and villages around the mountains and lakes, is
best time to visit.

Wineries:
Amisfield Wine Company: Classy Pinot Noir
Felton Road Wines: Top notch bio-dynamic producer of Pinot Noir,
Riesling and Chardonnay.
Gibbston Valley: Tourist centre – wines include Pinot Noir, Chardonnay
Mt. Difficulty: Pinot Noir, Pinot Gris, Riesling.
Quartz Reef: Impressive Traditional Method sparkling, Pinot Gris
Peregrine Wines: Stunning architecture – Pinot Noir; Riesling.

Dining:
Amisfield Bistro: Lunch and early dinner
Gibbston Valley: Winery restaurant & cheesery
Mt. Difficulty Wines: Restaurant open for lunches.

Good references:

Cuisine Magazinehttp://cuisine.co.nz/
Michael Cooper’s Wine Atlashttp://www.michaelcooper.co.nz/
NZ Wine (On-line reference)http://www.nzwine.com/
NZ.COM websitehttp://www.nzwine.com/

--
alt.food.wine FAQ: *http://winefaq.cwdjr.net


Thanks so much Mark. We will be trying to get to as many places as
possible but, because it is a cruise, Central Otago is out. Just too
far a trip from any of the cruise stops.
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Old 24-05-2012, 08:56 AM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default Revised Section 3t. New Zealand?

"lleichtman" wrote .........

Thanks so much Mark. We will be trying to get to as many places
as possible but, because it is a cruise, Central Otago is out.
Just too far a trip from any of the cruise stops.


Larry, go on - lash out - a chartered helicopter is your answer!
Maybe an hour and a bit from Dunedin and about 2 hrs from Christchurch :-)
If you're going thru Auckland, if you would care to drop me an email, as
below, I am there nearly every weekend - I make a good local tour guide

Andrew (st.helier)
alphabetanz at hotmail dot com

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Old 24-05-2012, 05:45 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default Revised Section 3t. New Zealand?

On May 24, 1:56*am, "st.helier" wrote:
"lleichtman" *wrote .........



Thanks so much Mark. We will be trying to get to as many places
as possible but, because it is a cruise, Central Otago is out.
Just too far a trip from any of the cruise stops.


Larry, go on - lash out - a chartered helicopter is your answer!
Maybe an hour and a bit from Dunedin and about 2 hrs from Christchurch :-)
If you're going thru Auckland, if you would care to drop me an email, as
below, I am *there nearly every weekend - I make a good local tour guide

Andrew (st.helier)
alphabetanz at hotmail dot com


Most gracious thanks Andrew will do. I'm bringing a group with me so a
helicopter is probably out plus I couldn't get my wife in one unless
we were evacuating which she would, most likely, promptly do as soon
as we got on one.


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Old 24-05-2012, 07:23 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 77
Default Revised Section 3t. New Zealand?

On Thu, 24 May 2012 09:45:21 -0700 (PDT), lleichtman
wrote:

a
helicopter is probably out plus I couldn't get my wife in one unless
we were evacuating which she would, most likely, promptly do as soon
as we got on one.



LOL!

--
Ken Blake
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Old 24-05-2012, 07:52 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 95
Default Revised Section 3t. New Zealand?

"lleichtman" wrote ................

Most gracious thanks Andrew will do. I'm bringing a group with me so
a helicopter is probably out plus I couldn't get my wife in one unless
we were evacuating which she would, most likely, promptly do as
soon as we got on one.


So I guess bungy jumping is out :-)
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Old 24-05-2012, 09:41 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default Revised Section 3t. New Zealand?

On 5/24/12 2:52 PM, st.helier wrote:
"lleichtman" wrote ................

Most gracious thanks Andrew will do. I'm bringing a group with me so
a helicopter is probably out plus I couldn't get my wife in one unless
we were evacuating which she would, most likely, promptly do as
soon as we got on one.


So I guess bungy jumping is out :-)


as well as Flying Fox rides ;-)

Mark Lipton

--
alt.food.wine FAQ: http://winefaq.cwdjr.net
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Old 25-05-2012, 02:38 AM posted to alt.food.wine
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Posts: 408
Default Revised Section 3t. New Zealand?

On May 24, 2:41*pm, Mark Lipton wrote:
On 5/24/12 2:52 PM, st.helier wrote:

"lleichtman" *wrote ................


Most gracious thanks Andrew will do. I'm bringing a group with me so
a helicopter is probably out plus I couldn't get my wife in one unless
we were evacuating which she would, most likely, promptly do as
soon as we got on one.


So I guess bungy jumping is out :-)


as well as Flying Fox rides ;-)

Mark Lipton

--
alt.food.wine FAQ: *http://winefaq.cwdjr.net


Nope, Zip lines won't cut it and don't you spill your wine?
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Old 25-05-2012, 04:31 AM posted to alt.food.wine
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Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 95
Default Revised Section 3t. New Zealand?

"lleichtman" wrote ...

Nope, Zip lines won't cut it and don't you spill your wine?


I did a 300m bungy jump from a helicopter - spilled a small dro.......

....... sorry - spilled a drop - of blood (grazed knees upon landing)

Can't remember the wine afterwards - taste buds were bouncing for some time
:-)




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Old 25-05-2012, 09:48 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default Revised Section 3t. New Zealand?

On May 22, 12:42*pm, Mark Lipton wrote:
Although history will show that the first grapes were planted by English
settlers in the early 1800s, the modern history of the NZ wine industry
started with the planting of Vitis Vinifera *grapes in the late 1960s to
early 1970's. However, it was the release of Cloudy Bay's 1985
(Marlborough) Sauvignon Blanc that first placed NZ on the world's
winemaking map.
In the fifteen years since 1997 , NZ wine industry has undergone a
period of spectacular development. In 1997 there were less than 7,000
hectares under vine: by the end of 2011 the national total was more than
33,600 hectares – some 56% of those planting in Marlborough.
Today, there are some 700 wineries - it should be noted that 600 are
smaller producers (less than 20,000 cases per year). Marlborough
Sauvignon Blanc accounts for over 50% of NZs annual wine production,
while Pinot Noir (both volume and quality) has improved greatly in the
past five years. Some excellent examples of Riesling, Pinot Gris, Syrah
are to be found – and do not be surprised to find some gorgeous
Gewürztraminer, vivacious Viognier, beautiful Bordeaux blends as well as
the occasional Arneis; Chenin Blanc; Grüner Veltliner; Pinot Blanc;
Malbec; Montepulciano; Sangiovese or Tempranillo.
Since 2007 there has been a strong commitment to both, sustainable
production in vineyards and wineries, and organic programmes. It is
estimated that over 94% of the producing vineyard area is participating
in the Sustainable Winegrowing New Zealand (SWNZ) initiative and a
further 3-5% is producing under certified organic programmes.
Participation in organic production is anticipated to continue to
increase over the next decade in all likelihood reaching 20% by 2020.
*Despite the distances involved, New Zealand is truly an excellent wine
destination.
Auckland International is about 26 hours from London Heathrow; 13 hours
direct from LAX and 3-3.5 from Australia’s east coast.
International travellers will typically arrive early in the morning, so
plan on taking the rest of the day to rest and recuperate, although
there are a few wineries based in and around Auckland city (and Waiheke
Island) to visit.
Owing to a lack of suitable public transport (servicing wine-making
regions) driving is virtually the only option available to the intrepid
visitor. IMPORTANT NOTE: DRIVING IS ON THE LEFT and speed limits are
rigorously monitored with speed cameras.
In Auckland, Hawkes Bay & Marlborough mini-bus wine tours are available
(generally only on weekends). Rental cars are plentiful and inexpensive
– Google search and reserve on-line.
NZ comprises two main islands, both of which contain several winemaking
regions. From the far north to Central Otago stretches 1,000 miles
(1,600km) - so a tour can take as little as four / five days (Hawkes Bay
/ Marlborough) or a couple of weeks.
The main wine regions in the North Island are Hawke's Bay (Syrah,
Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, and Chardonnay) and Martinborough (Pinot
Noir, Chardonnay and Pinot Gris); while Marlborough (Sauvignon Blanc,
Riesling & Pinot Noir) and Central Otago (Pinot Noir, Riesling & Pinot
Gris) are the key areas on the South Island. The most popular mode of
accommodation is the (self contained) Motel; however, a range of hotels,
B&Bs etc are available around the country. Reservations, while
recommended, are mandatory only during peak holiday seasons (December -
February). Many wineries do not have visitor facilities; those that do
welcome visitors, generally without reservation. Tasting is normally
free (those that do charge will refund off purchase). Respectfully, it
is suggested that a phone call explaining that you are an overseas
visitor may pay dividends, with a private tour and chat to the
winemaker. Point out that you may not be purchasing - this is acceptable
in the case of an overseas visitor - you will still get an A1 reception.

NORTH ISLAND

HAWKES BAY: *A comfortable drive four hour drive from Auckland, through
the thermal region of Rotorua. Stay on Napier’s waterfront, where the
architecture is distinctly Art Deco, owing to the rebuild of the city
following a major earthquake in 1931. Drive to the top of Te Mata peak
for spectacular views of the area.

Wineries:
Church Road Wines: Pernod Ricard's Hawkes Bay HQ, al fresco Lunches, museum
C J Pask Wines: Syrah
Craggy Range: Showcase winery. Stunning Syrah.
Esk Valley Wines: High quality Bordeaux blends. The Terraces (Malbec) is
iconic.
Sileni Estates: Epicurean Centre (Carefully matched cheese & wine
tasting); Olive oils.
Stonecroft Wines: Excellent Syrah, Gewürztraminer and Chardonnay
Te Mata Estate: Iconic NZ Cabernet/Merlot *(Coleraine). *Not so much a
visit as a pilgrimage.
Trinity Hill – One of NZs finest Syrahs (Homage)

Dining:
Brookfield Vineyards - Luncheon restaurant
Clearview Estate - al fresco dining near the sea.
Craggy Range - Restaurant

MARTINBOROUGH: A little over an hours drive north of Wellington,
boutique wineries abound. Pinot capital of NZ.

Wineries:
Ata Rangi: Top class Pinot Noir, Pinot Gris
Martinborough Vineyards: Classy Pinot Noir, Chardonnay, Riesling
Dry River: True legend - Cellar door by appointment – Pinot Noir, Pinot
Gris, Gewürztraminer all icons.
Palliser Estate: Pinot Noir, Pinot Gris, very good Sauvignon Blanc
Murdoch James Estate: Organic Pinot Noir.

Dining:
Murdoch James Estate: Café lunches.

Lodging:
Murdoch James Estate: Original farmhouse cottage – self contained.

SOUTH ISLAND

MARLBOROUGH: While being the spiritual home of Sauvignon Blanc,
Marlborough offers some special fine dining experiences. If you have
“done” the North Island first, take the three hour ferry trip from
Wellington – the difference between the two islands is amazing.

Wineries:
Allan Scott Wines: *Excellent white wines; courtyard lunch venue.
Cloudy Bay: Iconic Sauvignon Blanc. A must visit.
Highfield Estate & Restaurant: Very nice bubbles
Johanneshof Cellars: NZs most awarded Gewürztraminer
Lawson's Dry Hills Wines: Very good Sauvignon Blanc & Gewürztraminer
Pernod Ricard Visitor Cent Restaurant, retail store, tasting rooms
and wine education facility.
Villa Maria Marlborough Winery: Large visitor centre
Wairau River Wines: Ageworthy Sauvignon Blanc
Wither Hills: Sauvignon Blanc, Pinot Gris.

Dining:
Allan Scott Wines: Vineyard Restaurant
Herzog Winery & Restaurant: Best winery restaurant in NZ – prepare to
indulge.
Herzog Cellar Door Bistro: Casual lunches in garden environment
Highfield Estate & Restaurant
Saint Clair Estate Wines: Café lunches.
Wairau River Wines: Good winery restaurant

Lodging:
Hans Herzog Vineyard Cottage – on the estate.

CANTERBURY: The recent earthquakes may have devastated the city of
Christchurch, but the coastal drive south from Marlborough is
magnificent. Stop for crayfish (NZ rock lobster) in Kaikoura – and make
the left turn to Pegasus Bay.

Wineries:
Bell Hill Vineyard: By appointment only; highly rated Chardonnay and
Pinot Noir
Mud House Winery & Café: Classy Sauvignon Blanc producer (Marlborough)
Pegasus Bay: Canterbury’s top winery - Excellent Riesling, Pinot Noir,
Chardonnay
Pyramid Valley: very good Pinot Noir and other interesting wines

Dining:
Pegasus Bay: Top rated winery restaurant

CENTRAL OTAGO: The nearest NZ has to a continental climate. Adventure
capital of the world! Vying with Martinborough as Pinot paradise. Winter
is for skiers, while autumn (late April), simply a kaleidoscope of
colour in the valleys and villages around the mountains and lakes, is
best time to visit.

Wineries:
Amisfield Wine Company: Classy Pinot Noir
Felton Road Wines: Top notch bio-dynamic producer of Pinot Noir,
Riesling and Chardonnay.
Gibbston Valley: Tourist centre – wines include Pinot Noir, Chardonnay
Mt. Difficulty: Pinot Noir, Pinot Gris, Riesling.
Quartz Reef: Impressive Traditional Method sparkling, Pinot Gris
Peregrine Wines: Stunning architecture – Pinot Noir; Riesling.

Dining:
Amisfield Bistro: Lunch and early dinner
Gibbston Valley: Winery restaurant & cheesery
Mt. Difficulty Wines: Restaurant open for lunches.

Good references:

Cuisine Magazinehttp://cuisine.co.nz/
Michael Cooper’s Wine Atlashttp://www.michaelcooper.co.nz/
NZ Wine (On-line reference)http://www.nzwine.com/
NZ.COM websitehttp://www.nzwine.com/

--
alt.food.wine FAQ: *http://winefaq.cwdjr.net


Any wineries worth mentioning in the Auckland area?
  #12 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 27-05-2012, 02:29 AM posted to alt.food.wine
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Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 95
Default Revised Section 3t. New Zealand?

"lleichtman" asked.....

Any wineries worth mentioning in the Auckland area?


In the 1980s and early 90s there were still a handful of wineries in West
Auckland, however, as Marlborough, Hawkes Bay expanded both in terms of
production and importance, there is not much of a presence left close to
Auckland city. EXCEPT as follows:

Waiheke is a one hour ferry ride from downtown Auckland. Take a look at
http://waiheke.aucklandnz.com/

Matakana is a 40 minute drive north of Auckland city.
http://www.matakanawine.com/summary.html

Ascension at Matakana is a great visit for lunch - but most of the others
are very small boutique operations, which personally, leave me a little
underwhelmed :-(

Within the bounds of Auckland city, not far from Auckland's International
Airport, Villa Maria Wines run a very popular Winery, Vineyard Café & Cellar
Door, with their wines from Auckland, Hawkes Bay, Marlborough and Otago
regions all stocked.

If time is of consideration, this is worth a visit, perhaps for lunch.

st.helier

  #13 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-05-2012, 12:14 AM posted to alt.food.wine
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 37
Default Revised Section 3t. New Zealand?


"st.helier" wrote in message
...
| "lleichtman" asked.....
|
| Any wineries worth mentioning in the Auckland area?
|
| In the 1980s and early 90s there were still a handful of wineries in
West
| Auckland, however, as Marlborough, Hawkes Bay expanded both in terms
of
| production and importance, there is not much of a presence left close
to
| Auckland city. EXCEPT as follows:
|
| Waiheke is a one hour ferry ride from downtown Auckland. Take a look
at
| http://waiheke.aucklandnz.com/
|
| Matakana is a 40 minute drive north of Auckland city.
| http://www.matakanawine.com/summary.html
|
| Ascension at Matakana is a great visit for lunch - but most of the
others
| are very small boutique operations, which personally, leave me a
little
| underwhelmed :-(
|
| Within the bounds of Auckland city, not far from Auckland's
International
| Airport, Villa Maria Wines run a very popular Winery, Vineyard Café &
Cellar
| Door, with their wines from Auckland, Hawkes Bay, Marlborough and
Otago
| regions all stocked.
|
| If time is of consideration, this is worth a visit, perhaps for lunch.
|
| st.helier
|
|

There are still a number of wineries in the western districts.
If you'd like to try some serious kiwi Chardonnay add
Kumeu River Winery to your list. ( Small detour on the way/return
to/from Matakana )

http://www.kumeuriver.co.nz/
http://www.wineanorak.com/newzealand/kumeuriver.htm

and you'll find north american accents here;
http://www.puririhills.com/
Small, high priced, boutique operation. Book a visit off the website.
Count on this consuming a lot of shore-time, however.

Waiheke Island is THE local wine destination. Melts down credit cards
sadly.

greybeard





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