Wine (alt.food.wine) Devoted to the discussion of wine and wine-related topics. A place to read and comment about wines, wine and food matching, storage systems, wine paraphernalia, etc. In general, any topic related to wine is valid fodder for the group.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #16 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-06-2011, 04:43 PM posted to alt.food.wine
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 408
Default Corkage Fees

On Jun 2, 2:43*pm, Ed Rasimus wrote:
On Thu, 2 Jun 2011 13:07:06 -0700 (PDT), lleichtman









wrote:
On Jun 2, 9:27*am, Ed Rasimus wrote:
On Thu, 2 Jun 2011 07:21:14 -0700 (PDT), lleichtman


wrote:
On Jun 2, 5:49 am, "st.helier" wrote:
"lleichtman" wrote in message .....
On Jun 1, 12:03 pm, Earle Jones wrote:
Most good restaurants derive a good bit of their revenue from wine sales
and therefore charge a corkage fee for those customers who bring their
own wine.


One waiter told me that their corkage fee was $15. He also said that
there was no corkage fee if the customer brought a screw-top bottle.


But there is a $15 screwage fee.


I would gladly pay a corkage fee but it isn't allowed in the New
Mexico so I'm stuck with whatever is on the wine list and often at 3
times retail not wholesale.


???? Larry, I am confused???
What do you mean "it isn't allowed"
Are you saying that there is a law against BYO restaurants in New Mexico?
Therefore, if I decided to open a restaurant in Albuquerque, some lawmaker
could dictate whether or not I could let my customers bring their own wine
while I reserve the right to charge a corkage fee???
And I thought that the USA was the home of free-enterprise!!!!!


--


st.helier


Yep, State law prevents bringing your own bottle to a restaurant.
Don't know why. I can't get any rational explanation. It protects
restaurants but allows them to charge ridiculous prices. You can,
however, walk out of the restaurant with an open bottle you bought!!


Alcohol laws remain largely state-by-state, which can be very good or
very bad, depending upon the state. Over the last fifty years the
trend has been favorable and each election more areas go "wet" and
there is better availability.


As I recall, when I lived in NM (long ago, galaxy far away), you could
"brown-bag" beer and wine if a restaurant did not have a liquor
license. If they did, however, then you had to buy their offerings.
There also were beer/wine licenses and full-service licenses.


Total licenses for the state were fixed in number, so to open a new
facility with a license you had to find a license holder willing to
sell his license. Made for a very lucrative market and often the
license was worth multiple times what the entire business was worth.


Worst state I ever lived in for alcohol laws was Alabama, but that was
thirty five years ago. Colorado was excellent except for no beer sales
in grocery stores on Sunday before noon. Texas is rapidly reaching
into the 20th century with few dry counties remaining and even Dallas
expanding the wet precincts last election.


Federalism reigns and I still like it better than having the feds
involved.


You can no longer brown bag beer or wine to any restaurant liquor
license or not.


Well, I'll be in Santa Fe for a week, in about ten days. Inn of the
Anasazi and some very fine dining on the agenda. No brown bags in my
future.

Skipping the Compound and Geronimo this vist, but will do Anasazi,
Coyote Cafe (new management last year and back to the glory days!),
Ristra and 315 Wine Bar.

Anybody got other favorites?


The O eating house in Pojoaque has excellent Mediterranean style food
and an excellent and reasonably priced wine list. Coyote has certainly
made a comeback with Eric Destefano in charge. I also really like
Galisteo Bistro on Gallisteo street.

  #17 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-06-2011, 10:07 PM posted to alt.food.wine
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 383
Default Corkage Fees

On Fri, 3 Jun 2011 08:43:05 -0700 (PDT), lleichtman
wrote:

On Jun 2, 2:43*pm, Ed Rasimus wrote:
On Thu, 2 Jun 2011 13:07:06 -0700 (PDT), lleichtman









wrote:
On Jun 2, 9:27*am, Ed Rasimus wrote:
On Thu, 2 Jun 2011 07:21:14 -0700 (PDT), lleichtman


wrote:
On Jun 2, 5:49 am, "st.helier" wrote:
"lleichtman" wrote in message .....
On Jun 1, 12:03 pm, Earle Jones wrote:
Most good restaurants derive a good bit of their revenue from wine sales
and therefore charge a corkage fee for those customers who bring their
own wine.


One waiter told me that their corkage fee was $15. He also said that
there was no corkage fee if the customer brought a screw-top bottle.


But there is a $15 screwage fee.


I would gladly pay a corkage fee but it isn't allowed in the New
Mexico so I'm stuck with whatever is on the wine list and often at 3
times retail not wholesale.


???? Larry, I am confused???
What do you mean "it isn't allowed"
Are you saying that there is a law against BYO restaurants in New Mexico?
Therefore, if I decided to open a restaurant in Albuquerque, some lawmaker
could dictate whether or not I could let my customers bring their own wine
while I reserve the right to charge a corkage fee???
And I thought that the USA was the home of free-enterprise!!!!!


--


st.helier


Yep, State law prevents bringing your own bottle to a restaurant.
Don't know why. I can't get any rational explanation. It protects
restaurants but allows them to charge ridiculous prices. You can,
however, walk out of the restaurant with an open bottle you bought!!


Alcohol laws remain largely state-by-state, which can be very good or
very bad, depending upon the state. Over the last fifty years the
trend has been favorable and each election more areas go "wet" and
there is better availability.


As I recall, when I lived in NM (long ago, galaxy far away), you could
"brown-bag" beer and wine if a restaurant did not have a liquor
license. If they did, however, then you had to buy their offerings.
There also were beer/wine licenses and full-service licenses.


Total licenses for the state were fixed in number, so to open a new
facility with a license you had to find a license holder willing to
sell his license. Made for a very lucrative market and often the
license was worth multiple times what the entire business was worth.


Worst state I ever lived in for alcohol laws was Alabama, but that was
thirty five years ago. Colorado was excellent except for no beer sales
in grocery stores on Sunday before noon. Texas is rapidly reaching
into the 20th century with few dry counties remaining and even Dallas
expanding the wet precincts last election.


Federalism reigns and I still like it better than having the feds
involved.


You can no longer brown bag beer or wine to any restaurant liquor
license or not.


Well, I'll be in Santa Fe for a week, in about ten days. Inn of the
Anasazi and some very fine dining on the agenda. No brown bags in my
future.

Skipping the Compound and Geronimo this vist, but will do Anasazi,
Coyote Cafe (new management last year and back to the glory days!),
Ristra and 315 Wine Bar.

Anybody got other favorites?


The O eating house in Pojoaque has excellent Mediterranean style food
and an excellent and reasonably priced wine list. Coyote has certainly
made a comeback with Eric Destefano in charge. I also really like
Galisteo Bistro on Gallisteo street.


It's amazing that Destefano doesn't have a coronary in the kitchen. At
Geronimo you didn't see him, but at Coyote with the open kitchen it's
tough to miss.

We generally stay right downtown, so O will be missed. For Spanish we
really liked La Boca last time we were in town. Pretty close to
authentic Spanish tapas. And, they introduced me to albarino. A
win-win!

Might be able to squeeze Galisteo Bistro in to the mix, but there is
also the mandatory visit to Tomasita's and I've only got four days of
gluttony available.

  #18 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-06-2011, 10:14 PM posted to alt.food.wine
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 2,849
Default Corkage Fees

On 6/3/11 5:07 PM, Ed Rasimus wrote:

Might be able to squeeze Galisteo Bistro in to the mix, but there is
also the mandatory visit to Tomasita's and I've only got four days of
gluttony available.


Ed,
Another enthusiastic vote for Galisteo Bistro. We had a great meal
there last year when in Santa Fe. I'm psyched to hear that Coyote Cafe
is on the upswing as we've loved the cooking at Geronimo every time
we've been there.

Mark Lipton

--
alt.food.wine FAQ: http://winefaq.cwdjr.net
  #19 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 04-06-2011, 12:00 AM posted to alt.food.wine
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 408
Default Corkage Fees

On Jun 3, 3:07*pm, Ed Rasimus wrote:
On Fri, 3 Jun 2011 08:43:05 -0700 (PDT), lleichtman









wrote:
On Jun 2, 2:43 pm, Ed Rasimus wrote:
On Thu, 2 Jun 2011 13:07:06 -0700 (PDT), lleichtman


wrote:
On Jun 2, 9:27 am, Ed Rasimus wrote:
On Thu, 2 Jun 2011 07:21:14 -0700 (PDT), lleichtman


wrote:
On Jun 2, 5:49 am, "st.helier" wrote:
"lleichtman" wrote in message .....
On Jun 1, 12:03 pm, Earle Jones wrote:
Most good restaurants derive a good bit of their revenue from wine sales
and therefore charge a corkage fee for those customers who bring their
own wine.


One waiter told me that their corkage fee was $15. He also said that
there was no corkage fee if the customer brought a screw-top bottle.


But there is a $15 screwage fee.


I would gladly pay a corkage fee but it isn't allowed in the New
Mexico so I'm stuck with whatever is on the wine list and often at 3
times retail not wholesale.


???? Larry, I am confused???
What do you mean "it isn't allowed"
Are you saying that there is a law against BYO restaurants in New Mexico?
Therefore, if I decided to open a restaurant in Albuquerque, some lawmaker
could dictate whether or not I could let my customers bring their own wine
while I reserve the right to charge a corkage fee???
And I thought that the USA was the home of free-enterprise!!!!!


--


st.helier


Yep, State law prevents bringing your own bottle to a restaurant.
Don't know why. I can't get any rational explanation. It protects
restaurants but allows them to charge ridiculous prices. You can,
however, walk out of the restaurant with an open bottle you bought!!


Alcohol laws remain largely state-by-state, which can be very good or
very bad, depending upon the state. Over the last fifty years the
trend has been favorable and each election more areas go "wet" and
there is better availability.


As I recall, when I lived in NM (long ago, galaxy far away), you could
"brown-bag" beer and wine if a restaurant did not have a liquor
license. If they did, however, then you had to buy their offerings.
There also were beer/wine licenses and full-service licenses.


Total licenses for the state were fixed in number, so to open a new
facility with a license you had to find a license holder willing to
sell his license. Made for a very lucrative market and often the
license was worth multiple times what the entire business was worth..


Worst state I ever lived in for alcohol laws was Alabama, but that was
thirty five years ago. Colorado was excellent except for no beer sales
in grocery stores on Sunday before noon. Texas is rapidly reaching
into the 20th century with few dry counties remaining and even Dallas
expanding the wet precincts last election.


Federalism reigns and I still like it better than having the feds
involved.


You can no longer brown bag beer or wine to any restaurant liquor
license or not.


Well, I'll be in Santa Fe for a week, in about ten days. Inn of the
Anasazi and some very fine dining on the agenda. No brown bags in my
future.


Skipping the Compound and Geronimo this vist, but will do Anasazi,
Coyote Cafe (new management last year and back to the glory days!),
Ristra and 315 Wine Bar.


Anybody got other favorites?


The O eating house in Pojoaque has excellent Mediterranean style food
and an excellent and reasonably priced wine list. Coyote has certainly
made a comeback with Eric Destefano in charge. I also really like
Galisteo Bistro on Gallisteo street.


It's amazing that Destefano doesn't have a coronary in the kitchen. At
Geronimo you didn't see him, but at Coyote with the open kitchen it's
tough to miss.

We generally stay right downtown, so O will be missed. For Spanish we
really liked La Boca *last time we were in town. Pretty close to
authentic Spanish tapas. And, they introduced me to albarino. A
win-win!

Might be able to squeeze Galisteo Bistro in to the mix, but there is
also the mandatory visit to Tomasita's and I've only got four days of
gluttony available.


And Tomasitas isn't open on Sunday. Great call on La Boca. Very
authentic tapas and good but not cheap wine list.
  #20 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 04-06-2011, 02:24 PM posted to alt.food.wine
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 383
Default Corkage Fees

On Fri, 03 Jun 2011 17:14:32 -0400, Mark Lipton
wrote:

On 6/3/11 5:07 PM, Ed Rasimus wrote:

Might be able to squeeze Galisteo Bistro in to the mix, but there is
also the mandatory visit to Tomasita's and I've only got four days of
gluttony available.


Ed,
Another enthusiastic vote for Galisteo Bistro. We had a great meal
there last year when in Santa Fe. I'm psyched to hear that Coyote Cafe
is on the upswing as we've loved the cooking at Geronimo every time
we've been there.

Mark Lipton


I'm very amenable to suggestions. Particularly knowledgeable ones. I
looked at the Galisteo web page after the recommendation and
immediately cancelled plans for 315 Wine Bar and inked in Galisteo for
one nite.

I've loved Geronimo for years but last visit we did G and Coyote on
consecutive nights and found Geronimo to be a bit stilted and old
school with virtually nothing creative going on. Coyote, on the other
hand, had great wait-staff, a vibe of energy and some really neat now
things happening.

It isn't Mark Miller redux, as the lean seems to be in new wave
deconstructed (I had the deconstructed BLT with pork belly and
heirloom tomatoes for example). There's still a proper NM southwest
flavor about the place but it's different than Miller's signature.

Oh, and we had a very nice Pinot Noir with the BLT as SWMBO was
enjoying a red meat, buffalo or maybe elk, IIRC.


  #21 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 04-06-2011, 02:30 PM posted to alt.food.wine
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 383
Default Corkage Fees

On Fri, 3 Jun 2011 16:00:02 -0700 (PDT), lleichtman
wrote:

On Jun 3, 3:07*pm, Ed Rasimus wrote:
On Fri, 3 Jun 2011 08:43:05 -0700 (PDT), lleichtman









wrote:
On Jun 2, 2:43 pm, Ed Rasimus wrote:
On Thu, 2 Jun 2011 13:07:06 -0700 (PDT), lleichtman


wrote:
On Jun 2, 9:27 am, Ed Rasimus wrote:
On Thu, 2 Jun 2011 07:21:14 -0700 (PDT), lleichtman


wrote:
On Jun 2, 5:49 am, "st.helier" wrote:
"lleichtman" wrote in message .....
On Jun 1, 12:03 pm, Earle Jones wrote:
Most good restaurants derive a good bit of their revenue from wine sales
and therefore charge a corkage fee for those customers who bring their
own wine.


One waiter told me that their corkage fee was $15. He also said that
there was no corkage fee if the customer brought a screw-top bottle.


But there is a $15 screwage fee.


I would gladly pay a corkage fee but it isn't allowed in the New
Mexico so I'm stuck with whatever is on the wine list and often at 3
times retail not wholesale.


???? Larry, I am confused???
What do you mean "it isn't allowed"
Are you saying that there is a law against BYO restaurants in New Mexico?
Therefore, if I decided to open a restaurant in Albuquerque, some lawmaker
could dictate whether or not I could let my customers bring their own wine
while I reserve the right to charge a corkage fee???
And I thought that the USA was the home of free-enterprise!!!!!


--


st.helier


Yep, State law prevents bringing your own bottle to a restaurant.
Don't know why. I can't get any rational explanation. It protects
restaurants but allows them to charge ridiculous prices. You can,
however, walk out of the restaurant with an open bottle you bought!!


Alcohol laws remain largely state-by-state, which can be very good or
very bad, depending upon the state. Over the last fifty years the
trend has been favorable and each election more areas go "wet" and
there is better availability.


As I recall, when I lived in NM (long ago, galaxy far away), you could
"brown-bag" beer and wine if a restaurant did not have a liquor
license. If they did, however, then you had to buy their offerings.
There also were beer/wine licenses and full-service licenses.


Total licenses for the state were fixed in number, so to open a new
facility with a license you had to find a license holder willing to
sell his license. Made for a very lucrative market and often the
license was worth multiple times what the entire business was worth.


Worst state I ever lived in for alcohol laws was Alabama, but that was
thirty five years ago. Colorado was excellent except for no beer sales
in grocery stores on Sunday before noon. Texas is rapidly reaching
into the 20th century with few dry counties remaining and even Dallas
expanding the wet precincts last election.


Federalism reigns and I still like it better than having the feds
involved.


You can no longer brown bag beer or wine to any restaurant liquor
license or not.


Well, I'll be in Santa Fe for a week, in about ten days. Inn of the
Anasazi and some very fine dining on the agenda. No brown bags in my
future.


Skipping the Compound and Geronimo this vist, but will do Anasazi,
Coyote Cafe (new management last year and back to the glory days!),
Ristra and 315 Wine Bar.


Anybody got other favorites?


The O eating house in Pojoaque has excellent Mediterranean style food
and an excellent and reasonably priced wine list. Coyote has certainly
made a comeback with Eric Destefano in charge. I also really like
Galisteo Bistro on Gallisteo street.


It's amazing that Destefano doesn't have a coronary in the kitchen. At
Geronimo you didn't see him, but at Coyote with the open kitchen it's
tough to miss.

We generally stay right downtown, so O will be missed. For Spanish we
really liked La Boca *last time we were in town. Pretty close to
authentic Spanish tapas. And, they introduced me to albarino. A
win-win!

Might be able to squeeze Galisteo Bistro in to the mix, but there is
also the mandatory visit to Tomasita's and I've only got four days of
gluttony available.


And Tomasitas isn't open on Sunday. Great call on La Boca. Very
authentic tapas and good but not cheap wine list.


Won't be there on a Sunday. In town Mon-Fri and will probably hit
Tomasita's for a lunch.

Also on my recommended list is Trattoria Nostrani about three blocks
north of the plaza. Not over the top great, but pretty good Italian.

But, who goes to Santa Fe for Italian?


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
tasting fees:general Bill Loftin Wine 2 04-10-2007 06:13 PM
Tasting fees: general Ronin[_5_] Wine 2 04-10-2007 05:16 PM
corkage on Celebrity BAD NEWS Joseph Coulter Wine 3 29-01-2006 08:10 PM
Fees for selling wine? james Winemaking 4 16-08-2004 04:55 PM
Corkage Fee Earle Jones Wine 4 09-07-2004 10:21 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 09:37 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2022 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Food and drink"

 

Copyright © 2017