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Old 20-03-2011, 01:58 PM posted to alt.food.wine,rec.crafts.brewing,rec.food.cooking
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Default Taking some wine to friends house.

On Sat, 19 Mar 2011 18:27:07 -0700, "Bob Terwilliger"
wrote:

Clueless AOL newbie Sheldon "Pussy" Katz blathered:

If wine needs decanting and filtering to make it drinkable then it wasn't
worth more than $2/liter to begin with...


Never even heard of vintage port, have you?


Actually there is vintage port and it can be quite pricy, I posted
about it a few times because it's one of my hobbies... someone educate
this keyboard kook.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Port_wine

http://www.portwine.com/products/product1-1.htm

http://www.portwine.com/products/product1-2.htm



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Old 20-03-2011, 04:39 PM posted to alt.food.wine,rec.crafts.brewing,rec.food.cooking
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Default Taking some wine to friends house.

On 20/03/2011 12:14 PM, Paul Arthur wrote:

Never even heard of vintage port, have you?


Actually there is vintage port and it can be quite pricy,


Um, duh. That was his point. That pricy vintage port often requires
decanting due to sediment, which rather argues against the claim that
wines worth more than $2/liter don't need decanting.


It was Sheldon. Don't expect it to make sense.

A few years ago my wife bought me a bottle of vintage port. It was
wonderful stuff. I confess to being naive about vintage port. I had no
idea there would be so much dregs in the bottom of the bottle. I would
estimate that 10-15% of the volume of the bottle was dregs. Rude surprise.


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Old 20-03-2011, 04:49 PM posted to alt.food.wine,rec.crafts.brewing,rec.food.cooking
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Default Taking some wine to friends house.

On 3/20/2011 12:39 PM, Dave Smith wrote:
On 20/03/2011 12:14 PM, Paul Arthur wrote:

Never even heard of vintage port, have you?

Actually there is vintage port and it can be quite pricy,


Um, duh. That was his point. That pricy vintage port often requires
decanting due to sediment, which rather argues against the claim that
wines worth more than $2/liter don't need decanting.


It was Sheldon. Don't expect it to make sense.

A few years ago my wife bought me a bottle of vintage port. It was
wonderful stuff. I confess to being naive about vintage port. I had no
idea there would be so much dregs in the bottom of the bottle. I would
estimate that 10-15% of the volume of the bottle was dregs. Rude surprise.


Is any harm done by filtering out the dregs?

--


James Silverton, Potomac

I'm "not"

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Old 20-03-2011, 05:26 PM posted to alt.food.wine,rec.crafts.brewing,rec.food.cooking
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Default Taking some wine to friends house.

wrote:
Brooklyn1 wrote:
On Sat, 19 Mar 2011 18:27:07 -0700, "Bob Terwilliger"
wrote:

If wine needs decanting and filtering to make it drinkable then it wasn't
worth more than $2/liter to begin with...

Never even heard of vintage port, have you?


Actually there is vintage port and it can be quite pricy,


Um, duh. That was his point. That pricy vintage port often requires
decanting due to sediment, which rather argues against the claim that
wines worth more than $2/liter don't need decanting.


There is never a reason to decant any wine, if there is sediment just
don't shake it up... oh, I see now... yoose decant into a fancy
schmancy bottle so your guests won't know you're serving
Boone's Farm. Maybe I'll buy some $50 bottle of vodka so I can decant
too! LOL-LOL

What a buncha phony baloney pretentious schmucks!

Ahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha. . . .
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Old 20-03-2011, 05:27 PM posted to alt.food.wine,rec.crafts.brewing,rec.food.cooking
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Default Taking some wine to friends house.

On Sun, 20 Mar 2011 12:39:54 -0400, Dave Smith
wrote:

On 20/03/2011 12:14 PM, Paul Arthur wrote:

Never even heard of vintage port, have you?

Actually there is vintage port and it can be quite pricy,


Um, duh. That was his point. That pricy vintage port often requires
decanting due to sediment, which rather argues against the claim that
wines worth more than $2/liter don't need decanting.


It was Sheldon. Don't expect it to make sense.

A few years ago my wife bought me a bottle of vintage port. It was
wonderful stuff. I confess to being naive about vintage port. I had no
idea there would be so much dregs in the bottom of the bottle. I would
estimate that 10-15% of the volume of the bottle was dregs. Rude surprise.


Liar.


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Old 20-03-2011, 06:46 PM posted to alt.food.wine,rec.crafts.brewing,rec.food.cooking
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Default Taking some wine to friends house.

On Sun, 20 Mar 2011 12:49:05 -0400, James Silverton
wrote:

On 3/20/2011 12:39 PM, Dave Smith wrote:
On 20/03/2011 12:14 PM, Paul Arthur wrote:

Never even heard of vintage port, have you?

Actually there is vintage port and it can be quite pricy,

Um, duh. That was his point. That pricy vintage port often requires
decanting due to sediment, which rather argues against the claim that
wines worth more than $2/liter don't need decanting.


It was Sheldon. Don't expect it to make sense.

A few years ago my wife bought me a bottle of vintage port. It was
wonderful stuff. I confess to being naive about vintage port. I had no
idea there would be so much dregs in the bottom of the bottle. I would
estimate that 10-15% of the volume of the bottle was dregs. Rude surprise.


Is any harm done by filtering out the dregs?


Get it through your head that there are no dregs in commercially
bottled wines, they've already been filtered when bottled... what you
see at the bottom of the bottle are crystals/sufites, you cannot
filter that out because if disturbed it immediately go back into
solution. I used to make my own wine, still had no dregs because I
siphoned it out of the carboys from above the dregs, it didn't need
filtering except for the last bit at the bottom and I used that for
cooking... the dregs are nothing more than small bits of fruit, can't
hurt anything. Anyone who brews coffee/tea there are dregs, no one
filters those bits out, just don't pour the last dregs into your cup.
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Old 20-03-2011, 07:22 PM posted to alt.food.wine,rec.crafts.brewing,rec.food.cooking
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Default Taking some wine to friends house.

On 20/03/2011 12:49 PM, James Silverton wrote:
On 3/20/2011 12:39 PM, Dave Smith wrote:
On 20/03/2011 12:14 PM, Paul Arthur wrote:

Never even heard of vintage port, have you?

Actually there is vintage port and it can be quite pricy,

Um, duh. That was his point. That pricy vintage port often requires
decanting due to sediment, which rather argues against the claim that
wines worth more than $2/liter don't need decanting.


It was Sheldon. Don't expect it to make sense.

A few years ago my wife bought me a bottle of vintage port. It was
wonderful stuff. I confess to being naive about vintage port. I had no
idea there would be so much dregs in the bottom of the bottle. I would
estimate that 10-15% of the volume of the bottle was dregs. Rude
surprise.


Is any harm done by filtering out the dregs?

We ended up pouring it through a fine sieve. It was fine, but I was
amazed at the volume of the dregs.
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Old 20-03-2011, 07:23 PM posted to alt.food.wine,rec.crafts.brewing,rec.food.cooking
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Default Taking some wine to friends house.

On 20/03/2011 1:27 PM, Brooklyn1 wrote:

A few years ago my wife bought me a bottle of vintage port. It was
wonderful stuff. I confess to being naive about vintage port. I had no
idea there would be so much dregs in the bottom of the bottle. I would
estimate that 10-15% of the volume of the bottle was dregs. Rude surprise.


Liar.


Moron.
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Old 20-03-2011, 08:04 PM posted to alt.food.wine,rec.crafts.brewing,rec.food.cooking
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Default Taking some wine to friends house.

On 3/20/2011 2:46 PM, Brooklyn1 wrote:
On Sun, 20 Mar 2011 12:49:05 -0400, James Silverton
wrote:

On 3/20/2011 12:39 PM, Dave Smith wrote:
On 20/03/2011 12:14 PM, Paul Arthur wrote:

Never even heard of vintage port, have you?

Actually there is vintage port and it can be quite pricy,

Um, duh. That was his point. That pricy vintage port often requires
decanting due to sediment, which rather argues against the claim that
wines worth more than $2/liter don't need decanting.

It was Sheldon. Don't expect it to make sense.

A few years ago my wife bought me a bottle of vintage port. It was
wonderful stuff. I confess to being naive about vintage port. I had no
idea there would be so much dregs in the bottom of the bottle. I would
estimate that 10-15% of the volume of the bottle was dregs. Rude surprise.


Is any harm done by filtering out the dregs?


Get it through your head that there are no dregs in commercially
bottled wines, they've already been filtered when bottled.


OK, semantics! What is the sediment in the bottom of a bottle of port?
It does not redissolve, AFAICT.

--


James Silverton, Potomac

I'm "not"

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Old 20-03-2011, 10:30 PM posted to alt.food.wine,rec.crafts.brewing,rec.food.cooking
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Default Taking some wine to friends house.

On 20/03/2011 5:59 PM, Stu. wrote:
On Sun, 20 Mar 2011 15:22:52 -0400, Dave
wrote:

On 20/03/2011 12:49 PM, James Silverton wrote:
On 3/20/2011 12:39 PM, Dave Smith wrote:
On 20/03/2011 12:14 PM, Paul Arthur wrote:

Never even heard of vintage port, have you?

Actually there is vintage port and it can be quite pricy,

Um, duh. That was his point. That pricy vintage port often requires
decanting due to sediment, which rather argues against the claim that
wines worth more than $2/liter don't need decanting.

It was Sheldon. Don't expect it to make sense.

A few years ago my wife bought me a bottle of vintage port. It was
wonderful stuff. I confess to being naive about vintage port. I had no
idea there would be so much dregs in the bottom of the bottle. I would
estimate that 10-15% of the volume of the bottle was dregs. Rude
surprise.


Is any harm done by filtering out the dregs?

We ended up pouring it through a fine sieve. It was fine, but I was
amazed at the volume of the dregs.


Obviously they pulled it from the bottom of the vat, any wine I made was pulled
from about an inch and a half above the carboy's bottom and filtered through a
electric filter (eight paper filters).

Most Chilean wines I've ever drank never had sediments, so I'm not sure what
you bought.


The only thing obvious is that you didn't read much of my post. It
wasn't Chilean wine. It was vintage port. I doubt that any Chilean wine
sold here would have sediment. It is basically cheap wine made to be
consumed soon after bottling. They may make some quality wines intended
to be aged, but the stuff I see in the liquor store is budget wine,
sometimes heavy tasting, but not complex.


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Old 30-04-2011, 11:50 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by john brooks View Post
I would like it to be at its best so thought i would 'decant' it before
taking it there. I will. pour it into a jug and then pour it back in the
bottle.

Should i do that today or wait until tomorrow. In other words how long
before the event to decant it? Thanks.
From your description, I wouldn't really know if the wine you have still needs decanting or not. Also, if your friends don't know much about treating wine before drinking then they might wonder why you brought wine that's already opened. I advice to just decant it in your friend's place, a few minutes before drinking it (that is, if you're certain that the bottle you hold needs to be rid of the sediments in it). If you want to learn more about wines, then you might also want to check this: Gary Vaynerchuk's Blogging at the Wine Library. He's recently gaining popularity from his works and programs named Wine Library Television. Hope it'll help broaden you and your friends' interest for wine-tasting experiences.

Cheers!
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Old 30-05-2011, 04:37 PM posted to alt.food.wine,rec.crafts.brewing,rec.food.cooking
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Default Taking some wine to friends house.


"Sqwertz" wrote in message
...
On Sat, 19 Mar 2011 15:14:17 -0000, john brooks wrote:

Going to some friends for luch tomorrow. Today i bought a bottle of red
wine
from Chile to take with us..

I would like it to be at its best so thought i would 'decant' it before
taking it there. I will. pour it into a jug and then pour it back in the
bottle.

Should i do that today or wait until tomorrow. In other words how long
before the event to decant it? Thanks.


Just take some Boone's Farm from 7-11 and stop the necessary
crossposting.


Nothing wrong with crossposting


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Old 30-05-2011, 05:05 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default Taking some wine to friends house.

john ryan wrote:
"Sqwertz" wrote in
message
...
On Sat, 19 Mar 2011 15:14:17 -0000, john brooks
wrote:

Going to some friends for luch tomorrow. Today i
bought a bottle of
red wine
from Chile to take with us..

I would like it to be at its best so thought i
would 'decant' it
before taking it there. I will. pour it into a
jug and then pour
it back in the bottle.

Should i do that today or wait until tomorrow. In
other words how
long before the event to decant it? Thanks.


Just take some Boone's Farm from 7-11 and stop the
necessary
crossposting.


Nothing wrong with crossposting


Says YOU, the idiot.




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