Wine (alt.food.wine) Devoted to the discussion of wine and wine-related topics. A place to read and comment about wines, wine and food matching, storage systems, wine paraphernalia, etc. In general, any topic related to wine is valid fodder for the group.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 11-01-2011, 03:30 PM posted to alt.food.wine
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 4,554
Default TN: Sicily and Alsace

Betsy was taking Dave to airport Mon eve, so I was in charge of
dinner. Slow cooker with lentils and tomato, trumpet/creminis, salad,
and garlic bread. I used some of the 2007 Hugel Gewurztraminer (375
ml) for the mushrooms, and we had as an apertif. Floral, some lichee
and peach fruit, a little minty note. Decent acidity for Gewurz, not
exciting but good for a $9 half. B/B-

Dinner wine was the 2000 Calabretta Etna Rosso. At first I'm not a
fan- there's a pruney note and some oxidation over a base of spicy red
fruit. I like it better with air, where paradoxily (is that a word?)
the oxidative notes fade a bit. Medium body, still a fair amount of
tannin. Earth, spice, citrus zest. Not really what I expected (more
tannic and rustic than the Biondi Etna I am used to) but nice wine. A
pretty fair value in mid-$20s. B

Grade disclaimer: I'm a very easy grader, basically A is an excellent
wine, B a good wine, C mediocre. Anything below C means I wouldn't
drink at a party where it was only choice. Furthermore, I offer no
promises of objectivity, accuracy, and certainly not of consistency.*
*

  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 11-01-2011, 03:36 PM posted to alt.food.wine
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 1,930
Default TN: Sicily and Alsace

On Jan 11, 10:30*am, DaleW wrote:
Betsy was taking Dave to airport Mon eve, so I was in charge of
dinner. Slow cooker with lentils and tomato, trumpet/creminis, salad,
and garlic bread. I used some of the 2007 Hugel Gewurztraminer (375
ml) for the mushrooms, and we had as an apertif. Floral, some lichee
and peach fruit, a little minty note. Decent acidity for Gewurz, not
exciting but good for a $9 half. B/B-

Dinner wine was the 2000 Calabretta Etna Rosso. At first I'm not a
fan- there's a pruney note and some oxidation over a base of spicy red
fruit. I like it better with air, where paradoxily (is that a word?)
the oxidative notes fade a bit. Medium body, still a fair amount of
tannin. Earth, spice, citrus zest. Not really what I expected (more
tannic and rustic than the Biondi Etna I am used to) but nice wine. A
pretty fair value in mid-$20s. B

Grade disclaimer: I'm a very easy grader, basically A is an excellent
wine, B a good wine, C mediocre. Anything below C means I wouldn't
drink at a party where it was only choice. Furthermore, I offer no
promises of objectivity, accuracy, and certainly not of consistency.*
*


Interesting notes on the Calabretta Etna Rosso. I find the wines of
Sicily to be somewhat paradoxical. I've found some good examples but
generally I find poor either over-ripe wanna-be California knock-offs
or very rustic, high acid plonk. I've never visited Sicily so I don't
know if this is just what the importers offer us or if it is
indicitive of Sicilian wines in general.
  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 11-01-2011, 03:57 PM posted to alt.food.wine
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 4,554
Default TN: Sicily and Alsace

On Jan 11, 10:36*am, "Bi!!" wrote:
On Jan 11, 10:30*am, DaleW wrote:

Interesting notes on the Calabretta Etna Rosso. *I find the wines of
Sicily to be somewhat paradoxical. *I've found some good examples but
generally I find poor either over-ripe wanna-be California knock-offs
or very rustic, high acid plonk. *I've never visited Sicily so I don't
know if this is just what the importers offer us or if it is
indicitive of Sicilian wines in general.


That was generally my impression- overripe glossy Nero d'Avolas, or
somewhat poorly made wines.
But I think Sicily is one of the most improved areas in last few year.
I'm particularly fond of Etna Rosso, the wines are grown up high on Mt
Etna, so not as obviously hot climate. There's a range of styles- the
basic Terre Nere and especially the Biondi come across as almost
Burgundian, the upper level Terre Nere wines are more slick/modern but
very good, and some more rustic wines like this. But in general
interesting appellation.
I also like Montoni's Nero d'Avola, both regular and Vru-something.
Arianna Occhipinti makes very interesting wines in the natural/
hipster mode.
Frank Cornelissen also gets lots of acclaim (and some raspberries) but
I've not tried.

Actually, if anyone is interested in Sicily, this week's Tuesday sale
at Astor Wines is Sicily. 15% off.
  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 11-01-2011, 04:16 PM posted to alt.food.wine
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 1,930
Default TN: Sicily and Alsace

On Jan 11, 10:57*am, DaleW wrote:
On Jan 11, 10:36*am, "Bi!!" wrote:

On Jan 11, 10:30*am, DaleW wrote:


Interesting notes on the Calabretta Etna Rosso. *I find the wines of
Sicily to be somewhat paradoxical. *I've found some good examples but
generally I find poor either over-ripe wanna-be California knock-offs
or very rustic, high acid plonk. *I've never visited Sicily so I don't
know if this is just what the importers offer us or if it is
indicitive of Sicilian wines in general.


That was generally my impression- overripe glossy Nero d'Avolas, or
somewhat poorly made wines.
But I think Sicily is one of the most improved areas in last few year.
I'm particularly fond of Etna Rosso, the wines are grown up high on Mt
Etna, so not as obviously hot climate. There's a range of styles- the
basic Terre Nere and especially the Biondi come across as almost
Burgundian, the upper level Terre Nere wines are more slick/modern but
very good, and some more rustic wines like this. But in general
interesting appellation.
I also like Montoni's Nero d'Avola, both regular and Vru-something.
*Arianna Occhipinti makes very interesting wines in the natural/
hipster mode.
Frank Cornelissen also gets lots of acclaim (and some raspberries) but
I've not tried.

Actually, if anyone is interested in Sicily, this week's Tuesday sale
at Astor Wines is Sicily. 15% off.


I've probably had more wine from Andrea Franchetti than anyone else in
Sicily. His wines tend to be a bit glossy but "Franchetti" is the
flagship wine and I find it to be a bit over the top.. I really like
the Passopisciaro and tend to think of it as the best example of good
Etna wines.
  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 11-01-2011, 04:30 PM posted to alt.food.wine
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 2,849
Default TN: Sicily and Alsace

On 1/11/11 10:57 AM, DaleW wrote:

But I think Sicily is one of the most improved areas in last few year.
I'm particularly fond of Etna Rosso, the wines are grown up high on Mt
Etna, so not as obviously hot climate. There's a range of styles- the
basic Terre Nere and especially the Biondi come across as almost
Burgundian, the upper level Terre Nere wines are more slick/modern but
very good, and some more rustic wines like this. But in general
interesting appellation.
I also like Montoni's Nero d'Avola, both regular and Vru-something.
Arianna Occhipinti makes very interesting wines in the natural/
hipster mode.


Arianna Occhipinti and her uncle at COS make some very interesting wines
from unusual grapes like Frappato. Of the Occhipinti wines, I've most
enjoyed the SP64 blend.


Frank Cornelissen also gets lots of acclaim (and some raspberries) but
I've not tried.


Yes, Cornelissen's wines are about as controversial as any I can think
of. There seems to be a lot of sentiment (as opposed to sediment) that
a lot of them that reach the US have been damaged in some way. I dunno:
too pricey for an experiment in my book.

Mark Lipton


--
alt.food.wine FAQ: http://winefaq.cwdjr.net


  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 11-01-2011, 04:45 PM posted to alt.food.wine
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 1,930
Default TN: Sicily and Alsace

On Jan 11, 11:30*am, Mark Lipton wrote:
On 1/11/11 10:57 AM, DaleW wrote:

But I think Sicily is one of the most improved areas in last few year.
I'm particularly fond of Etna Rosso, the wines are grown up high on Mt
Etna, so not as obviously hot climate. There's a range of styles- the
basic Terre Nere and especially the Biondi come across as almost
Burgundian, the upper level Terre Nere wines are more slick/modern but
very good, and some more rustic wines like this. But in general
interesting appellation.
I also like Montoni's Nero d'Avola, both regular and Vru-something.
*Arianna Occhipinti makes very interesting wines in the natural/
hipster mode.


Arianna Occhipinti and her uncle at COS make some very interesting wines
from unusual grapes like Frappato. *Of the Occhipinti wines, I've most
enjoyed the SP64 blend.

Frank Cornelissen also gets lots of acclaim (and some raspberries) but
I've not tried.


Yes, Cornelissen's wines are about as controversial as any I can think
of. *There seems to be a lot of sentiment (as opposed to sediment) that
a lot of them that reach the US have been damaged in some way. *I dunno:
too pricey for an experiment in my book.

Mark Lipton

--
alt.food.wine FAQ: *http://winefaq.cwdjr.net


All of this talk of Sicily made me recall that I had purchased a mixed
case of Sicilian wine years ago and I still have a few bottles
remaining so I just checked and I have a couple of bottles of 1985
Duca Enrico Rosso Sicilia Nero D'Avola. I'll open a bottle with
dinner tonight and report. Not expecting much.
  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 11-01-2011, 07:31 PM posted to alt.food.wine
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 408
Default TN: Sicily and Alsace

On Jan 11, 10:12*am, Mike Tommasi wrote:
On 1/11/2011 5:30 PM, Mark Lipton wrote:

Yes, Cornelissen's wines are about as controversial as any I can think
of. *There seems to be a lot of sentiment (as opposed to sediment) that
a lot of them that reach the US have been damaged in some way. *I dunno:
too pricey for an experiment in my book.


Mark, they are damaged at birth. I know there are people ready to line
up for these wines, which proves how effective marketing can be. The
basic problem is that they don't know how to make wine.


I too have been disappointed with Cormelissen wines and have yet to
find one that appeals to my tastes. I'm still trying to find Sicilian
wines I really like other than the ones I really can't afford like
Vega.


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
TN: 3 wines- Sicily, MSR, Margaux DaleW Wine 0 21-04-2010 02:30 AM
TN: Italy from either end (Friuli and Sicily) DaleW Wine 0 04-01-2010 08:05 PM
TN: Dinner w/Daffoldils (Languedoc, Alsace, Loire, Burg, Sicily,Barsac) DaleW Wine 9 28-04-2009 06:29 PM
Developments in Sicily UC Wine 0 04-10-2006 10:21 PM
Sicily wine Shaiulud Wine 0 30-05-2006 06:15 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 01:12 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2022 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Food and drink"

 

Copyright © 2017