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Old 06-01-2011, 06:05 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default TN: Tuscany, Campania, Dordogne

Dave and Mary Kate graced us with their presence at dinner table last
night, Betsy decided to make Bolognese sauce, long a Dave fave.
Cooking/apertif wine was the 2009 Richard Bergerac Sec. Clean, crisp,
a little bit of grass. No apparent oak, nice but nothing that screams
buy again (though at $10 certainly acceptable value). B-

With the pasta/ragu, Betsy also made broccoli and a "butter bean bagna
cauda" salad. I wanted Italian red, and brought up the 1997
Mastrobernardino Radici Taurasi. Some VA, cherries, a bit pruney. Big,
still a bit of rough tannin on the backend. Wait, why am I drinking
this? C+

Replacement was the 2002 Montevertine. A bit too chilly, I decanted
and it gradually warmed up. Dried cherry, saddle leather, violets, a
bit of herb. This seems mature, midbodied, not a great Montevertine
but excellent for vintage. Probably at its best after couple hours in
decanter, last glass was falling apart a bit. B+/B

Grade disclaimer: I'm a very easy grader, basically A is an excellent
wine, B a good wine, C mediocre. Anything below C means I wouldn't
drink at a party where it was only choice. Furthermore, I offer no
promises of objectivity, accuracy, and certainly not of consistency.*

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Old 06-01-2011, 06:35 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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On 1/6/11 1:05 PM, DaleW wrote:

With the pasta/ragu, Betsy also made broccoli and a "butter bean bagna
cauda" salad. I wanted Italian red, and brought up the 1997
Mastrobernardino Radici Taurasi. Some VA, cherries, a bit pruney. Big,
still a bit of rough tannin on the backend. Wait, why am I drinking
this? C+

Replacement was the 2002 Montevertine. A bit too chilly, I decanted
and it gradually warmed up. Dried cherry, saddle leather, violets, a
bit of herb. This seems mature, midbodied, not a great Montevertine
but excellent for vintage. Probably at its best after couple hours in
decanter, last glass was falling apart a bit. B+/B


Interesting notes, Dale. How was 2002 in Tuscany? Did they have the
sort of rain problems that plagued Provence? And what was up with the
Taurasi? Was it flawed, or did you just not like it? I would think
that Aglianico would be right up your alley, being the "Nebbiolo of the
South" and all...

Mark Lipton

--
alt.food.wine FAQ: http://winefaq.cwdjr.net
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Old 06-01-2011, 07:02 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default TN: Tuscany, Campania, Dordogne

On Jan 6, 1:05*pm, DaleW wrote:
Dave and Mary Kate graced us with their presence at dinner table last
night, Betsy decided to make Bolognese sauce, long a Dave fave.
Cooking/apertif wine was the 2009 Richard Bergerac Sec. Clean, crisp,
a little bit of grass. No apparent oak, nice but nothing that screams
buy again (though at $10 certainly acceptable value). B-

With the pasta/ragu, Betsy also made broccoli and a "butter bean bagna
cauda" salad. I wanted Italian red, and brought up the 1997
Mastrobernardino Radici Taurasi. Some VA, cherries, a bit pruney. Big,
still a bit of rough tannin on the backend. Wait, why am I drinking
this? C+

Replacement was the 2002 Montevertine. A bit too chilly, I decanted
and it gradually warmed up. Dried cherry, saddle leather, violets, a
bit of herb. This seems mature, midbodied, not a great Montevertine
but excellent for vintage. Probably at its best after couple hours in
decanter, last glass was falling apart a bit. B+/B

Grade disclaimer: I'm a very easy grader, basically A is an excellent
wine, B a good wine, C mediocre. Anything below C means I wouldn't
drink at a party where it was only choice. Furthermore, I offer no
promises of objectivity, accuracy, and certainly not of consistency.*


While I've been a fan of Montevertine for years I've found the last
few bottles I've openend ('97,'99, '00) have shown a bit more oak than
I recalled (or prefer). How was the oak on this vintage?
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Old 06-01-2011, 07:24 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default TN: Tuscany, Campania, Dordogne

I find the 2000 Radici to be 'au point ' right now. Surprised that
the 1997 is still showing that degree of tannin!
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Old 06-01-2011, 07:28 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Posts: 4,554
Default TN: Tuscany, Campania, Dordogne

On Jan 6, 1:35*pm, Mark Lipton wrote:
On 1/6/11 1:05 PM, DaleW wrote:

With the pasta/ragu, Betsy also made broccoli and a "butter bean bagna
cauda" salad. I wanted Italian red, and brought up the 1997
Mastrobernardino Radici Taurasi. Some VA, cherries, a bit pruney. Big,
still a bit of rough tannin on the backend. Wait, why am I drinking
this? C+


Replacement was the 2002 Montevertine. A bit too chilly, I decanted
and it gradually warmed up. Dried cherry, saddle leather, violets, a
bit of herb. This seems mature, midbodied, not a great Montevertine
but excellent for vintage. Probably at its best after couple hours in
decanter, last glass was falling apart a bit. B+/B


Interesting notes, Dale. *How was 2002 in Tuscany? *Did they have the
sort of rain problems that plagued Provence? *And what was up with the
Taurasi? *Was it flawed, or did you just not like it? *I would think
that Aglianico would be right up your alley, being the "Nebbiolo of the
South" and all...

Mark Lipton

--
alt.food.wine FAQ: *http://winefaq.cwdjr.net


2002 was considered a disaster in TUscany I believe. Late rains. But I
think that they didn't make a Pergole Torte this year, just the entry
Pian del Ciampolo and this. So some good juice "declassified", and
strict selection, made for a good if not great wine

I usually do like the Mastrobernardino Taurasi, not sure if this was
storage (mine should have been fine, but I only got this about
2004/2005, so a few years in system)

Bill, no real apparent oak - this is the regular, not the Riserva.

The 68 Mastrobernardino Riserva is one of the greatest Italian wines
I've ever had.


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Old 06-01-2011, 09:27 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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On Jan 6, 2:02*pm, "Bi!!" wrote:
On Jan 6, 1:05*pm, DaleW wrote:









Dave and Mary Kate graced us with their presence at dinner table last
night, Betsy decided to make Bolognese sauce, long a Dave fave.
Cooking/apertif wine was the 2009 Richard Bergerac Sec. Clean, crisp,
a little bit of grass. No apparent oak, nice but nothing that screams
buy again (though at $10 certainly acceptable value). B-


With the pasta/ragu, Betsy also made broccoli and a "butter bean bagna
cauda" salad. I wanted Italian red, and brought up the 1997
Mastrobernardino Radici Taurasi. Some VA, cherries, a bit pruney. Big,
still a bit of rough tannin on the backend. Wait, why am I drinking
this? C+


Replacement was the 2002 Montevertine. A bit too chilly, I decanted
and it gradually warmed up. Dried cherry, saddle leather, violets, a
bit of herb. This seems mature, midbodied, not a great Montevertine
but excellent for vintage. Probably at its best after couple hours in
decanter, last glass was falling apart a bit. B+/B


Grade disclaimer: I'm a very easy grader, basically A is an excellent
wine, B a good wine, C mediocre. Anything below C means I wouldn't
drink at a party where it was only choice. Furthermore, I offer no
promises of objectivity, accuracy, and certainly not of consistency.*


While I've been a fan of Montevertine for years I've found the last
few bottles I've openend ('97,'99, '00) have shown a bit more oak than
I recalled (or prefer). *How was the oak on this vintage?


Bill, I actually misread your question, thought you were asking about
the Taurasi. I didn't find noticable oak, I don't usually find
Montevertine oaky except maybe in young Pergole Torte. I know the
Sodaccio and PdC are all botti, and the Pergole Torte botti then
barrique of mixed age, but don't know what the regular/Riserva (they
just used to call it riserva if they thought vintage could use a bit
more bottle age) does, and if it has changed.
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Old 07-01-2011, 04:00 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 1,930
Default TN: Tuscany, Campania, Dordogne

On Jan 6, 4:27*pm, DaleW wrote:
On Jan 6, 2:02*pm, "Bi!!" wrote:





On Jan 6, 1:05*pm, DaleW wrote:


Dave and Mary Kate graced us with their presence at dinner table last
night, Betsy decided to make Bolognese sauce, long a Dave fave.
Cooking/apertif wine was the 2009 Richard Bergerac Sec. Clean, crisp,
a little bit of grass. No apparent oak, nice but nothing that screams
buy again (though at $10 certainly acceptable value). B-


With the pasta/ragu, Betsy also made broccoli and a "butter bean bagna
cauda" salad. I wanted Italian red, and brought up the 1997
Mastrobernardino Radici Taurasi. Some VA, cherries, a bit pruney. Big,
still a bit of rough tannin on the backend. Wait, why am I drinking
this? C+


Replacement was the 2002 Montevertine. A bit too chilly, I decanted
and it gradually warmed up. Dried cherry, saddle leather, violets, a
bit of herb. This seems mature, midbodied, not a great Montevertine
but excellent for vintage. Probably at its best after couple hours in
decanter, last glass was falling apart a bit. B+/B


Grade disclaimer: I'm a very easy grader, basically A is an excellent
wine, B a good wine, C mediocre. Anything below C means I wouldn't
drink at a party where it was only choice. Furthermore, I offer no
promises of objectivity, accuracy, and certainly not of consistency.*


While I've been a fan of Montevertine for years I've found the last
few bottles I've openend ('97,'99, '00) have shown a bit more oak than
I recalled (or prefer). *How was the oak on this vintage?


Bill, I actually misread your question, thought you were asking about
the Taurasi. I didn't find noticable oak, I don't usually find
Montevertine oaky except maybe in young Pergole Torte. I know the
Sodaccio and PdC are all botti, and the Pergole Torte botti then
barrique of mixed age, but don't know what the regular/Riserva (they
just used to call it riserva if they thought vintage could use a bit
more bottle age) does, and if it has changed.- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


My recollection is 24 months of Slovenian Oak on the regular
Montevertine.
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Old 07-01-2011, 09:25 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 4,554
Default TN: Tuscany, Campania, Dordogne

On Jan 7, 11:00*am, "Bi!!" wrote:
On Jan 6, 4:27*pm, DaleW wrote:









On Jan 6, 2:02*pm, "Bi!!" wrote:


On Jan 6, 1:05*pm, DaleW wrote:


Dave and Mary Kate graced us with their presence at dinner table last
night, Betsy decided to make Bolognese sauce, long a Dave fave.
Cooking/apertif wine was the 2009 Richard Bergerac Sec. Clean, crisp,
a little bit of grass. No apparent oak, nice but nothing that screams
buy again (though at $10 certainly acceptable value). B-


With the pasta/ragu, Betsy also made broccoli and a "butter bean bagna
cauda" salad. I wanted Italian red, and brought up the 1997
Mastrobernardino Radici Taurasi. Some VA, cherries, a bit pruney. Big,
still a bit of rough tannin on the backend. Wait, why am I drinking
this? C+


Replacement was the 2002 Montevertine. A bit too chilly, I decanted
and it gradually warmed up. Dried cherry, saddle leather, violets, a
bit of herb. This seems mature, midbodied, not a great Montevertine
but excellent for vintage. Probably at its best after couple hours in
decanter, last glass was falling apart a bit. B+/B


Grade disclaimer: I'm a very easy grader, basically A is an excellent
wine, B a good wine, C mediocre. Anything below C means I wouldn't
drink at a party where it was only choice. Furthermore, I offer no
promises of objectivity, accuracy, and certainly not of consistency..*


While I've been a fan of Montevertine for years I've found the last
few bottles I've openend ('97,'99, '00) have shown a bit more oak than
I recalled (or prefer). *How was the oak on this vintage?


Bill, I actually misread your question, thought you were asking about
the Taurasi. I didn't find noticable oak, I don't usually find
Montevertine oaky except maybe in young Pergole Torte. I know the
Sodaccio and PdC are all botti, and the Pergole Torte botti then
barrique of mixed age, but don't know what the regular/Riserva (they
just used to call it riserva if they thought vintage could use a bit
more bottle age) does, and if it has changed.- Hide quoted text -


- Show quoted text -


My recollection is 24 months of Slovenian Oak on the regular
Montevertine.


Gilman says 24 months in old Slovenian botti for the regular (which
used to be the Riserva), the PdC, and Sodaccio (which is temporarily
old of lineup, vines were grubbed up and replanted circa 2000). PT is
18 months in old botti, and then 6 months in barrique, no more than
25% new .


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