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Old 27-01-2010, 02:50 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default 1997 Luigi Einaudi Barolo

1997 Luigi Einaudi Barolo. I've posted notes on this before but it's
been a while. I still have a few left from a case purchased on
release. I opened last night with grilled veal chops and creamy
polenta with white truffle butter. Dark red in the glass with just a
faint hint of brick (I think many Barolos are normally a bit brickish
in color) Typical Barolo nose of roses, tar, a bit of black tea and
ripe black plums. Fairly ripe on the palate showing dense black
cherry, plums, a bit of espresso and leather. Interesting sweet ripe
fruit notes at the front with a fairly high toned acidity on the
finish and fairly aggressive tannins. The wine could still use a few
more years. "B+"

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Old 27-01-2010, 08:21 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default 1997 Luigi Einaudi Barolo

On Jan 27, 9:50*am, "Bi!!" wrote:
1997 Luigi Einaudi Barolo. *I've posted notes on this before but it's
been a while. *I still have a few left from a case purchased on
release. *I opened last night with grilled veal chops and creamy
polenta with white truffle butter. *Dark red in the glass with just a
faint hint of brick (I think many Barolos are normally a bit brickish
in color) *Typical Barolo nose of roses, tar, a bit of black tea and
ripe black plums. *Fairly ripe on the palate showing dense black
cherry, plums, a bit of espresso and leather. *Interesting sweet ripe
fruit notes at the front with a fairly high toned acidity on the
finish and fairly aggressive tannins. *The wine could still use a few
more years. *"B+"


this is the normale? I drank my last bottle I think last year, thought
it reasonably mature with mostly resolved tannins. Bottle variation,
or maybe storage (I have good passive storage, but maybe tad warmer in
summer than ideal).
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Old 28-01-2010, 11:53 AM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default 1997 Luigi Einaudi Barolo

On Jan 27, 3:21�pm, DaleW wrote:
On Jan 27, 9:50�am, "Bi!!" wrote:

1997 Luigi Einaudi Barolo. �I've posted notes on this before but it's
been a while. �I still have a few left from a case purchased on
release. �I opened last night with grilled veal chops and creamy
polenta with white truffle butter. �Dark red in the glass with just a
faint hint of brick (I think many Barolos are normally a bit brickish
in color) �Typical Barolo nose of roses, tar, a bit of black tea and
ripe black plums. �Fairly ripe on the palate showing dense black
cherry, plums, a bit of espresso and leather. �Interesting sweet ripe
fruit notes at the front with a fairly high toned acidity on the
finish and fairly aggressive tannins. �The wine could still use a few
more years. �"B+"


this is the normale? I drank my last bottle I think last year, thought
it reasonably mature with mostly resolved tannins. Bottle variation,
or maybe storage (I have good passive storage, but maybe tad warmer in
summer than ideal).


I bought it directly from the distributor on release. My cellar is a
constant 55F (measured with a bottle probe not the air temp) with 70%
humidity. I find that many of my wines are drinking "younger" than
many of their counterparts from different cellars. Before building
the cellar 15 years or so ago, I found that my basement was actually
cooler in the summer than in the winter since I air-conditioned the
house in the summer the cool air would sink to the lower level and
keep the cellar quite cool yet in the winter the heat from the furnace
would actually increase the temp in the basement storage area to
higher than the 62F that it was in the summer.
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Old 28-01-2010, 03:36 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default 1997 Luigi Einaudi Barolo

On Jan 28, 6:53*am, "Bi!!" wrote:
On Jan 27, 3:21 pm, DaleW wrote:





On Jan 27, 9:50 am, "Bi!!" wrote:


1997 Luigi Einaudi Barolo. I've posted notes on this before but it's
been a while. I still have a few left from a case purchased on
release. I opened last night with grilled veal chops and creamy
polenta with white truffle butter. Dark red in the glass with just a
faint hint of brick (I think many Barolos are normally a bit brickish
in color) Typical Barolo nose of roses, tar, a bit of black tea and
ripe black plums. Fairly ripe on the palate showing dense black
cherry, plums, a bit of espresso and leather. Interesting sweet ripe
fruit notes at the front with a fairly high toned acidity on the
finish and fairly aggressive tannins. The wine could still use a few
more years. "B+"


this is the normale? I drank my last bottle I think last year, thought
it reasonably mature with mostly resolved tannins. Bottle variation,
or maybe storage (I have good passive storage, but maybe tad warmer in
summer than ideal).


I bought it directly from the distributor on release. *My cellar is a
constant 55F (measured with a bottle probe not the air temp) *with 70%
humidity. *I find that many of my wines are drinking "younger" than
many of their counterparts from different cellars. *Before building
the cellar 15 years or so ago, I found that my basement was actually
cooler in the summer than in the winter since I air-conditioned the
house in the summer the cool air would sink to the lower level and
keep the cellar quite cool yet in the winter the heat from the furnace
would actually increase the temp in the basement storage area to
higher than the 62F that it was in the summer.


my range is basically 50-65 F, with very slow changes. Small
reasonably efficient furnace is not next to cellar, but even right
next to furnace it doesn't warm much. I probably bought this at retail
a year or two after release, so that might be another possibility. In
general my wines seem to age fairly gracefully, and this was fine,
just sounded a touch more mature than yours. In general I don't think
97s are real long term wines, though they've generally been tasty.
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Old 28-01-2010, 05:59 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default 1997 Luigi Einaudi Barolo

On Jan 28, 10:36�am, DaleW wrote:
On Jan 28, 6:53�am, "Bi!!" wrote:





On Jan 27, 3:21 pm, DaleW wrote:


On Jan 27, 9:50 am, "Bi!!" wrote:


1997 Luigi Einaudi Barolo. I've posted notes on this before but it's
been a while. I still have a few left from a case purchased on
release. I opened last night with grilled veal chops and creamy
polenta with white truffle butter. Dark red in the glass with just a
faint hint of brick (I think many Barolos are normally a bit brickish
in color) Typical Barolo nose of roses, tar, a bit of black tea and
ripe black plums. Fairly ripe on the palate showing dense black
cherry, plums, a bit of espresso and leather. Interesting sweet ripe
fruit notes at the front with a fairly high toned acidity on the
finish and fairly aggressive tannins. The wine could still use a few
more years. "B+"


this is the normale? I drank my last bottle I think last year, thought
it reasonably mature with mostly resolved tannins. Bottle variation,
or maybe storage (I have good passive storage, but maybe tad warmer in
summer than ideal).


I bought it directly from the distributor on release. �My cellar is a
constant 55F (measured with a bottle probe not the air temp) �with 70%
humidity. �I find that many of my wines are drinking "younger" than
many of their counterparts from different cellars. �Before building
the cellar 15 years or so ago, I found that my basement was actually
cooler in the summer than in the winter since I air-conditioned the
house in the summer the cool air would sink to the lower level and
keep the cellar quite cool yet in the winter the heat from the furnace
would actually increase the temp in the basement storage area to
higher than the 62F that it was in the summer.


my range is basically 50-65 F, with very slow changes. Small
reasonably efficient furnace is not next to cellar, but even right
next to furnace it doesn't warm much. I probably bought this at retail
a year or two after release, so that might be another possibility. In
general my wines seem to age fairly gracefully, and this was fine,
just sounded a touch more mature than yours. In general I don't think
97s are real long term wines, though they've generally been tasty.- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


I don't thik the '97's are long term agers either but 20 years for
Barolo isn't extraordinary. I find it hard to judge by the color
given tat to me Barolo is already a bit brickish. The tannins in the
"97 Einaudi were still firm although my recollection is that Einaudi
is generally perceived as an "old style" producer.


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Old 28-01-2010, 06:56 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default 1997 Luigi Einaudi Barolo

On Jan 28, 12:59*pm, "Bi!!" wrote:
On Jan 28, 10:36 am, DaleW wrote:





On Jan 28, 6:53 am, "Bi!!" wrote:


On Jan 27, 3:21 pm, DaleW wrote:


On Jan 27, 9:50 am, "Bi!!" wrote:


1997 Luigi Einaudi Barolo. I've posted notes on this before but it's
been a while. I still have a few left from a case purchased on
release. I opened last night with grilled veal chops and creamy
polenta with white truffle butter. Dark red in the glass with just a
faint hint of brick (I think many Barolos are normally a bit brickish
in color) Typical Barolo nose of roses, tar, a bit of black tea and
ripe black plums. Fairly ripe on the palate showing dense black
cherry, plums, a bit of espresso and leather. Interesting sweet ripe
fruit notes at the front with a fairly high toned acidity on the
finish and fairly aggressive tannins. The wine could still use a few
more years. "B+"


this is the normale? I drank my last bottle I think last year, thought
it reasonably mature with mostly resolved tannins. Bottle variation,
or maybe storage (I have good passive storage, but maybe tad warmer in
summer than ideal).


I bought it directly from the distributor on release. My cellar is a
constant 55F (measured with a bottle probe not the air temp) with 70%
humidity. I find that many of my wines are drinking "younger" than
many of their counterparts from different cellars. Before building
the cellar 15 years or so ago, I found that my basement was actually
cooler in the summer than in the winter since I air-conditioned the
house in the summer the cool air would sink to the lower level and
keep the cellar quite cool yet in the winter the heat from the furnace
would actually increase the temp in the basement storage area to
higher than the 62F that it was in the summer.


my range is basically 50-65 F, with very slow changes. Small
reasonably efficient furnace is not next to cellar, but even right
next to furnace it doesn't warm much. I probably bought this at retail
a year or two after release, so that might be another possibility. In
general my wines seem to age fairly gracefully, and this was fine,
just sounded a touch more mature than yours. In general I don't think
97s are real long term wines, though they've generally been tasty.- Hide quoted text -


- Show quoted text -


I don't thik the '97's are long term agers either but 20 years for
Barolo isn't extraordinary. *I find it hard to judge by the color
given tat to me Barolo is already a bit brickish. *The tannins in the
"97 Einaudi were still firm although my recollection is that Einaudi
is generally perceived as an "old style" producer.


I think Einaudi is mixed- I think the basic Barolo is pretty
traditional, while the Costa Grimaldi is pretty modern. Not sure re
the Cannubi, never tried, though I have a couple 04s.
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Old 28-01-2010, 07:02 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Posts: 1,930
Default 1997 Luigi Einaudi Barolo

On Jan 28, 1:56�pm, DaleW wrote:
On Jan 28, 12:59�pm, "Bi!!" wrote:





On Jan 28, 10:36 am, DaleW wrote:


On Jan 28, 6:53 am, "Bi!!" wrote:


On Jan 27, 3:21 pm, DaleW wrote:


On Jan 27, 9:50 am, "Bi!!" wrote:


1997 Luigi Einaudi Barolo. I've posted notes on this before but it's
been a while. I still have a few left from a case purchased on
release. I opened last night with grilled veal chops and creamy
polenta with white truffle butter. Dark red in the glass with just a
faint hint of brick (I think many Barolos are normally a bit brickish
in color) Typical Barolo nose of roses, tar, a bit of black tea and
ripe black plums. Fairly ripe on the palate showing dense black
cherry, plums, a bit of espresso and leather. Interesting sweet ripe
fruit notes at the front with a fairly high toned acidity on the
finish and fairly aggressive tannins. The wine could still use a few
more years. "B+"


this is the normale? I drank my last bottle I think last year, thought
it reasonably mature with mostly resolved tannins. Bottle variation,
or maybe storage (I have good passive storage, but maybe tad warmer in
summer than ideal).


I bought it directly from the distributor on release. My cellar is a
constant 55F (measured with a bottle probe not the air temp) with 70%
humidity. I find that many of my wines are drinking "younger" than
many of their counterparts from different cellars. Before building
the cellar 15 years or so ago, I found that my basement was actually
cooler in the summer than in the winter since I air-conditioned the
house in the summer the cool air would sink to the lower level and
keep the cellar quite cool yet in the winter the heat from the furnace
would actually increase the temp in the basement storage area to
higher than the 62F that it was in the summer.


my range is basically 50-65 F, with very slow changes. Small
reasonably efficient furnace is not next to cellar, but even right
next to furnace it doesn't warm much. I probably bought this at retail
a year or two after release, so that might be another possibility. In
general my wines seem to age fairly gracefully, and this was fine,
just sounded a touch more mature than yours. In general I don't think
97s are real long term wines, though they've generally been tasty.- Hide quoted text -


- Show quoted text -


I don't thik the '97's are long term agers either but 20 years for
Barolo isn't extraordinary. �I find it hard to judge by the color
given tat to me Barolo is already a bit brickish. �The tannins in the
"97 Einaudi were still firm although my recollection is that Einaudi
is generally perceived as an "old style" producer.


I think Einaudi is mixed- I think the basic Barolo is pretty
traditional, while the Costa Grimaldi is pretty modern. Not sure re
the Cannubi, never tried, though I have a couple 04s.- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


Actually the Cannubi seems to cross the line between the two. It's
quite firm and tannic yet quite ripe and lush with fruit. Sorry about
typos in previous post...I am typing on a cell phone.


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