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  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 26-09-2004, 02:44 AM
st.helier
 
Posts: n/a
Default Australia - the Great Promised Land !

In a speech to the Wine & Spirit Education Trust (UK) Australian winemaker
made some very interesting observations.

He said "There is little doubt that Australia will fully develop its
abundant potential as a supplier of some of the finest wines of the world as
well as consolidate its position as the reliable supplier of "good value for
money" commodity wine"

"There is little doubt that France and the other "Old World" producers will
give up some more of their dominant 70% of market share of internationally
traded wine to the "New World" producers in both categories, branded
commodity and regionally differentiated premium wine."

"There will be a decreasing place for subsidised production lacking market
relevance."

"The real revolution in world wine production has only just begun, "the big
march south".

"Climate change, pollution, northern hemisphere land values and population
pressures will give added momentum to the inexorable march of global wine
production into the southern hemisphere."

"This migration is not a threat to the great wines of the Old World but will
provide a platform for the emergence of equivalent wines from south of the
equator."

"Australian agriculture now has the three W's, wheat, wool and wine and the
greatest of these will be wine, thanks largely to the consumers of the
northern hemisphere but also because of the sublime viticultural qualities
of Australia."

Full Article at http://www.bibendum-wine.co.uk/news/wset04.pdf

This is a long, but interesting read.

--

st.helier






  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 26-09-2004, 09:55 AM
Ron Lel
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"st.helier" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
In a speech to the Wine & Spirit Education Trust (UK) Australian winemaker
made some very interesting observations.

He said "There is little doubt that Australia will fully develop its
abundant potential as a supplier of some of the finest wines of the world
as
well as consolidate its position as the reliable supplier of "good value
for
money" commodity wine"

"There is little doubt that France and the other "Old World" producers
will
give up some more of their dominant 70% of market share of internationally
traded wine to the "New World" producers in both categories, branded
commodity and regionally differentiated premium wine."

"There will be a decreasing place for subsidised production lacking market
relevance."

"The real revolution in world wine production has only just begun, "the
big
march south".

"Climate change, pollution, northern hemisphere land values and population
pressures will give added momentum to the inexorable march of global wine
production into the southern hemisphere."

"This migration is not a threat to the great wines of the Old World but
will
provide a platform for the emergence of equivalent wines from south of the
equator."

"Australian agriculture now has the three W's, wheat, wool and wine and
the
greatest of these will be wine, thanks largely to the consumers of the
northern hemisphere but also because of the sublime viticultural qualities
of Australia."

Full Article at http://www.bibendum-wine.co.uk/news/wset04.pdf

This is a long, but interesting read.

--

st.helier


Well, I for one think this is self serving crap. Sure Australia makes some
excellent wines, but I find the vast majority of high powered Barossa shiraz
totally unpleasant. Unfortunately a lot of these wines have also become
Parkerised; they have high levels of alcohol and are really extractive and
what I would call "fruit bombs". I intensely dislike these wines, (eg
Lehmann, Rockford and even the hugely overpriced Torbreck), and find it hard
to drink more than a glass.

I believe that Australians like really strong flavours and dislike sublety
in both food and wine. (Before the flames start, I am Australian). Just one
example: it is interesting that the vast majority of Aussies prefer Bowen
Estate in the years when the style changed to a much higher alcohol
extractive style - I prefer the earlier wines.

Finally, contrary to the beliefs of some winemakers, Australia has produced
VERY few high quality pinots, Phil Jones' Bass Phillip being an obvious
exception.

Ron


  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 26-09-2004, 09:55 AM
Ron Lel
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"st.helier" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
In a speech to the Wine & Spirit Education Trust (UK) Australian winemaker
made some very interesting observations.

He said "There is little doubt that Australia will fully develop its
abundant potential as a supplier of some of the finest wines of the world
as
well as consolidate its position as the reliable supplier of "good value
for
money" commodity wine"

"There is little doubt that France and the other "Old World" producers
will
give up some more of their dominant 70% of market share of internationally
traded wine to the "New World" producers in both categories, branded
commodity and regionally differentiated premium wine."

"There will be a decreasing place for subsidised production lacking market
relevance."

"The real revolution in world wine production has only just begun, "the
big
march south".

"Climate change, pollution, northern hemisphere land values and population
pressures will give added momentum to the inexorable march of global wine
production into the southern hemisphere."

"This migration is not a threat to the great wines of the Old World but
will
provide a platform for the emergence of equivalent wines from south of the
equator."

"Australian agriculture now has the three W's, wheat, wool and wine and
the
greatest of these will be wine, thanks largely to the consumers of the
northern hemisphere but also because of the sublime viticultural qualities
of Australia."

Full Article at http://www.bibendum-wine.co.uk/news/wset04.pdf

This is a long, but interesting read.

--

st.helier


Well, I for one think this is self serving crap. Sure Australia makes some
excellent wines, but I find the vast majority of high powered Barossa shiraz
totally unpleasant. Unfortunately a lot of these wines have also become
Parkerised; they have high levels of alcohol and are really extractive and
what I would call "fruit bombs". I intensely dislike these wines, (eg
Lehmann, Rockford and even the hugely overpriced Torbreck), and find it hard
to drink more than a glass.

I believe that Australians like really strong flavours and dislike sublety
in both food and wine. (Before the flames start, I am Australian). Just one
example: it is interesting that the vast majority of Aussies prefer Bowen
Estate in the years when the style changed to a much higher alcohol
extractive style - I prefer the earlier wines.

Finally, contrary to the beliefs of some winemakers, Australia has produced
VERY few high quality pinots, Phil Jones' Bass Phillip being an obvious
exception.

Ron


  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 27-09-2004, 12:53 AM
Martin Field
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Ron Lel" wrote in message
...

BIG SNIP

Finally, contrary to the beliefs of some winemakers,
Australia has produced VERY few high quality pinots, Phil
Jones' Bass Phillip being an obvious exception.

Ron


Couldn't agree more Ron. Too many of them are still
reminiscent of brown-tinged dilute raspberry cordial -
likely to cost $AUD30 plus on release and with tragically
early use by dates.
Cheers!
Martin


  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 27-09-2004, 12:53 AM
Martin Field
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Ron Lel" wrote in message
...

BIG SNIP

Finally, contrary to the beliefs of some winemakers,
Australia has produced VERY few high quality pinots, Phil
Jones' Bass Phillip being an obvious exception.

Ron


Couldn't agree more Ron. Too many of them are still
reminiscent of brown-tinged dilute raspberry cordial -
likely to cost $AUD30 plus on release and with tragically
early use by dates.
Cheers!
Martin




  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 27-09-2004, 08:18 AM
Mat
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Martin Field wrote:
"Ron Lel" wrote in message
...

BIG SNIP


Finally, contrary to the beliefs of some winemakers,
Australia has produced VERY few high quality pinots, Phil
Jones' Bass Phillip being an obvious exception.

Ron



Couldn't agree more Ron. Too many of them are still
reminiscent of brown-tinged dilute raspberry cordial -
likely to cost $AUD30 plus on release and with tragically
early use by dates.
Cheers!
Martin



I can relate to the raspberry cordial angle. Even some of the shiraz
I've had lately has been that way.

  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-09-2004, 12:39 AM
Kieran Dyke
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Mat" [email protected] wrote in message ...
Martin Field wrote:
"Ron Lel" wrote in message
...

BIG SNIP


Finally, contrary to the beliefs of some winemakers,
Australia has produced VERY few high quality pinots, Phil
Jones' Bass Phillip being an obvious exception.

Ron



Couldn't agree more Ron. Too many of them are still
reminiscent of brown-tinged dilute raspberry cordial -
likely to cost $AUD30 plus on release and with tragically
early use by dates.
Cheers!
Martin



I can relate to the raspberry cordial angle. Even some of the shiraz
I've had lately has been that way.


I get more of the blackcurrant cordial, occasionally mixed with toothpaste.

Kieran


  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-09-2004, 12:39 AM
Kieran Dyke
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Mat" [email protected] wrote in message ...
Martin Field wrote:
"Ron Lel" wrote in message
...

BIG SNIP


Finally, contrary to the beliefs of some winemakers,
Australia has produced VERY few high quality pinots, Phil
Jones' Bass Phillip being an obvious exception.

Ron



Couldn't agree more Ron. Too many of them are still
reminiscent of brown-tinged dilute raspberry cordial -
likely to cost $AUD30 plus on release and with tragically
early use by dates.
Cheers!
Martin



I can relate to the raspberry cordial angle. Even some of the shiraz
I've had lately has been that way.


I get more of the blackcurrant cordial, occasionally mixed with toothpaste.

Kieran


  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-09-2004, 08:25 AM
Mat
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Kieran Dyke wrote:

"Mat" [email protected] wrote in message ...

Martin Field wrote:

"Ron Lel" wrote in message
...

BIG SNIP



Finally, contrary to the beliefs of some winemakers,
Australia has produced VERY few high quality pinots, Phil
Jones' Bass Phillip being an obvious exception.

Ron


Couldn't agree more Ron. Too many of them are still
reminiscent of brown-tinged dilute raspberry cordial -
likely to cost $AUD30 plus on release and with tragically
early use by dates.
Cheers!
Martin



I can relate to the raspberry cordial angle. Even some of the shiraz
I've had lately has been that way.



I get more of the blackcurrant cordial, occasionally mixed with toothpaste.

Kieran



Haha, yes, ur right! It still has a rather peculiar thin, sweat, sticky
quality. Which to my mind would require shipping it out as a cleanskin,
and starting again. Or at least making some attempt to mask it. I have a
bad feeling that is the way it is being made deliberately.

Are we to expect this to become a trend in Oz wines? I really hope not.
Wine for the sweet, carbonated mixer generation maybe?

Ppl my age, and younger (mid-20's) are flocking to wine, spirit sales
are down approx 25%. Mixers are up (the ultra sweet, ultra fizzy
pre-mixed drinks), but wine is strong too. So why the panic to market to
generation now? More and more ppl I know are flocking to wine.

Once someone "gets into" wine, they tend to drink it a lot. I hardly
ever drink beer, or spirits these days (in fact I forget the last time I
bought a slab or a bottle of spirits). Nor do ppl I know who have been
converted. Wine is just so much more versatile (suits all tastes), and
obviously goes with food. And is good for you. The only time I wouldn't
drink wine would be at a non-BYO restaurant (I simply refuse to pay 4-6
times more for a bottle I could literally walk across the street and
buy), or at a nightclub.

I just hope the ppl in the industry with the power to avert this do just
that. We don't need marketting hype to ruin something else.



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