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Old 08-04-2004, 11:52 PM
Neil R.
 
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Default carbonic maceration

i would doubt too many wine companies would be using CM for their cheaper
ranges. CM takes up a lot of tank space for a lot of time and would be
considered an uneconomic practice by the bean counters.
whole bunches could be added to a macerating must. whether this is
considered partial CM is in the eye of the beholder.
neil



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Old 09-04-2004, 01:18 PM
JEP
 
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Default carbonic maceration

"Neil R." wrote in message ...

whole bunches could be added to a macerating must. whether this is
considered partial CM is in the eye of the beholder.


This was my take on it also. Not really CM, but leaving a (small?)
percentage of whole clusters in the must.

Andy
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Old 09-04-2004, 06:04 PM
Mathew Kagis
 
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Default carbonic maceration


"JEP" wrote in message
om...
"Neil R." wrote in message

...

whole bunches could be added to a macerating must. whether this is
considered partial CM is in the eye of the beholder.


This was my take on it also. Not really CM, but leaving a (small?)
percentage of whole clusters in the must.

Andy

OK, if this is what producers are calling 'partial whole berry
fermentation' so be it. My question remains (especially in the case of
higher priced California products) Why do it?...see post below for my
objections.

Cheers
Mathew


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Old 12-04-2004, 02:03 PM
JEP
 
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Default carbonic maceration

"Mathew Kagis" wrote in message news:[email protected]
OK, if this is what producers are calling 'partial whole berry
fermentation' so be it. My question remains (especially in the case of
higher priced California products) Why do it?...see post below for my
objections.

Cheers
Mathew



Because what you (or I) want our young wine to be is not necessarily
what will sell the best. There are a lot more people who want run to
the store for a bottle to drink with dinner tonight than there are who
are willing to age a wine for 5-10 years.

Andy
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Old 12-04-2004, 06:23 PM
Mathew Kagis
 
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Default carbonic maceration



Because what you (or I) want our young wine to be is not necessarily
what will sell the best. There are a lot more people who want run to
the store for a bottle to drink with dinner tonight than there are who
are willing to age a wine for 5-10 years.

Andy

I am aware of the drink now market. I'm just wondering wy this trend to
soften, previously age worthy California Cabs has sprung up now? Does it
haqve something to do with the glut in the grape market dow there? or just a
desire by the producers to grab a larger share of the table wine market?

Mathew




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Old 27-04-2004, 06:26 AM
Bruce Edwards
 
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Default carbonic maceration

"Hey Chuck! I thought the D-block cab was all picked & crushed."

"It was."

"Well, Enrique just pulled up with the bobtail loaded with 30 lug boxes
picked off the end rows. Shall I have him bring em round to the crush pad?"

"The crusher's all cleaned up. It's not worth messin' it for a few
hundred pounds of grapes. Just dump the lug boxes right in the top of
tank 604 without destemmeing. We'll call it Partial Carbonic
Maceration. Marketing will love it."

-Bruce

Mathew Kagis wrote:
"JEP" wrote in message
om...

"Neil R." wrote in message


...

whole bunches could be added to a macerating must. whether this is
considered partial CM is in the eye of the beholder.


This was my take on it also. Not really CM, but leaving a (small?)
percentage of whole clusters in the must.

Andy


OK, if this is what producers are calling 'partial whole berry
fermentation' so be it. My question remains (especially in the case of
higher priced California products) Why do it?...see post below for my
objections.

Cheers
Mathew






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