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Old 03-02-2004, 09:55 PM
Dale Williams
 
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Default traditional Brunello

In article , Gio
writes:

Which Brunello producers are still hardliners? Apart from Lisini and
Biondi Santi. I simply can not afford them...


Well, I don't know about hardliners (and Lisini is not as traditional as B-S),
but
Scopetone and Capanna would be pretty traditional. I've never found Ciacci (in
the Brunello, though they do make new-wave Supertuscans) or Constanti to be
that oaky.


Dale

Dale Williams
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Old 04-02-2004, 06:23 AM
Gio
 
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Default traditional Brunello

Does anybody know which Brunello's are the traditional ones? I really
hate the typical modern style Tuscan reds were the (toasted) oak and
vanilla explodes in your mouth.

Which Brunello producers are still hardliners? Apart from Lisini and
Biondi Santi. I simply can not afford them...

Best regards,

Gio


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Old 04-02-2004, 08:42 AM
Luk
 
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Default traditional Brunello

Cị che ha detto
Dale Williams )
è coś interessante, che devo dire la mia:

In article , Gio
writes:

Which Brunello producers are still hardliners? Apart from Lisini and
Biondi Santi. I simply can not afford them...


Well, I don't know about hardliners (and Lisini is not as traditional
as B-S), but
Scopetone and Capanna would be pretty traditional. I've never found
Ciacci (in the Brunello, though they do make new-wave Supertuscans)
or Constanti to be that oaky.


Dale



Also Col d'Orcia is a good and fairly cheep traditional one. Avoid Banfi.
Consider that in the Brunello world traditional producers are many more than
modern one, and only recently the brunello's recipe has been modified toward
a modern style.
Try this one for a supposed complete list.
http://www.consorziobrunellodimontal...om/company.htm

Luk


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Old 04-02-2004, 05:28 PM
Dale Williams
 
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Default traditional Brunello

In article , "Luk"
writes:

onsider that in the Brunello world traditional producers are many more than
modern one, and only recently the brunello's recipe has been modified toward
a modern style.


That might be true, but in US at least I'd say there are more modern Brunellos
available than strictly traditional ones. The reality though is that most of
the wines (including the regular Banfi) are somewhere in the middle. From my
meager knowledge, for every modern Altesino there's a producer who uses some
new barriques, but some traditional techniques. Some producers produce might
both a tradtionally styled and a modern wine (with the modern style often being
their riserva).

BTW, to the OP, I don't think of Lisini as being especally expensive. The
normale tends to run in mid-$30US here, which is low-end for Brunello.

BTW,
Dale

Dale Williams
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Old 07-02-2004, 09:10 PM
Cwdjrx _
 
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Default traditional Brunello

Many years ago, shortly after release, I bought a case each of Lisini
Brunello and Riserva Brunello 1975. I have followed these wines since
that time. The regular was considerably lighter than the Riserva. I
guess you could say the regular was perhaps a bit modern and the riserva
was rather traditional. At this point the regular is somewhat in decline
and should have been drunk a few years ago. However the riserva still is
holding well, is full, and has developed a very good bouquet with age.
In earlier days, the regular was more drinkable and the riserva was a
bit reserved. How this relates to recent vintages of Lisini, I am not
sure, since I have not tasted these. For all I know, Lisini could have
changed their style somewhat over the years.

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Old 09-02-2004, 12:20 PM
Sven Gorval
 
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Default traditional Brunello

Lisini has not changed style, it is still very good. My personal
favorites (one bottle a year, given the prices) are Biondi Santi
Riserva, Case Basse-Soldera Riserva and Lisini Riserva, in that order.
A lot of patience is required but these are true gems.
More affordable are Il Poggione, Poggio Salvi (managed by Franco's son
Jacopo Biondi Santi), Pertimali, Poggio di Sotto.
Also you could give it a try buying Biondi Santi's regular Brunello
Annata (still expensive but more affordable) and Rosso di Montalcino
(around 30 euros bought on the premise). This last one is a real
Brunello (aged two years in big slavonian casks of different sizes)
unlike many counterparts and just needs a lot of patience (as usual)
in terms of bottle aging to show its true elegance.
Given your tastes (which I completely agree with) avoid Banfi,
Castelgiocondo, Fanti, Altesino, Campogiovanni, Poggio Antico, Pieve
Santa Restituta or any other Brunello that receives high marks by
suspicious critics.


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