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Old 06-11-2009, 02:17 AM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default Pinot Grigio

I've had inexpensive Pinot Grigio in the past, and never
thought too much about them until ...
A recent dinner where we made Orange Roughy Amandine
accompanied with white/wild rice, salad and biscuits.
The wine: Avantgarde Pinot Grigio 2005 Rheinhessen from
Germany. Alc. 12.5%
I don't have any eloquent tasting notes, but the wine was
superb with the fish, and I'll have to try more Pinot
Grigio in the future. The wine was gifted to me and I don't
think it was very expensive.
BTW: The bottle is beautiful, green with a partial diamond
shaped base and sides sloping up to the neck. I'm going to
keep the bottle for flowers or as a decorator item.
The unique bottle shape will be easy to spot at any wine
shop.

Dick in MN

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Old 06-11-2009, 06:47 AM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default Pinot Grigio

On Nov 5, 6:17*pm, dickr2 wrote:
I've had inexpensive Pinot Grigio in the past, and never
thought too much about them until ...
A recent dinner where we made Orange Roughy Amandine
accompanied with white/wild rice, salad and biscuits.
The wine: Avantgarde Pinot Grigio 2005 Rheinhessen from
Germany. Alc. 12.5%
I don't have any eloquent tasting notes, but the wine was
superb with the fish, and I'll have to try more Pinot
Grigio in the future. The wine was gifted to me and I don't
think it was very expensive.
BTW: The bottle is beautiful, green with a partial diamond
shaped base and sides sloping up to the neck. I'm going to
keep the bottle for flowers or as a decorator item.
The unique bottle shape will be easy to spot at any wine
shop.

Dick in MN


Dick in MN:

Pinot grigio (known as pinot gris in France and America) is a white
wine with delicate aromas and flavors and at its best, it makes a
perfect food wine. To me it's not a particularly spectacular grape
like sauvignon blanc, but in Napa I'm more accustomed to powerhouse
wines (which don't necessarily go well with food).

What I most appreciate with pinot grigio is balance and finesse.
However, in warmer climates it often loses the charm of its fruit and
tastes rather bland and neutral. In California, it's almost a
disaster except in cool coastal districts. Oregon over the past ten
years has ripped out most of their chardonnay, which was always a
delight to me, in order to plant pinot gris. In fact, the state has
bet the farm on it. I think this was a mistake, but that's my personal
opinion.

I enjoy your recommendation. In fact, I never knew that pinot grigio
was being grown extensively in Germany, but cool continental climate
districts seem to make some exceptional pinot gris. You may find some
interesting pinot grigio from Austria and the bordering areas of
northern Italy, like Alto Adige.

Thanks for this post! I will seek out that wine.

--Bob
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Old 06-11-2009, 07:37 AM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default Pinot Grigio

Bobchai wrote:

I never knew that pinot grigio
was being grown extensively in Germany


It not unusual, but I am not sure how extensively it is grown. It is
usually called Grauburgunder or, more traditionally, Ruländer. Never
heard of one being sold as Pinot Grigio before.

IMO it is a great variety, and very flexible in terms of matching with food.

--
Steve Slatcher
http://pobox.com/~steve.slatcher
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Old 06-11-2009, 12:49 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default Pinot Grigio


"Steve Slatcher" skrev i melding
...
Bobchai wrote:

I never knew that pinot grigio
was being grown extensively in Germany


It not unusual, but I am not sure how extensively it is grown. It is
usually called Grauburgunder or, more traditionally, Ruländer. Never
heard of one being sold as Pinot Grigio before.

Wein-Plus lists Pinot Gris (with synonyms Grauburgunder and Ruländer) as
comprising 4.3% of the growing area in Germany - 4.413 hectares - about
11.000 acres, I believe

Anders


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Old 06-11-2009, 02:21 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default Pinot Grigio

dickr2 writes:

I've had inexpensive Pinot Grigio in the past, and never
thought too much about them until ...
A recent dinner where we made Orange Roughy Amandine
accompanied with white/wild rice, salad and biscuits.
The wine: Avantgarde Pinot Grigio 2005 Rheinhessen from
Germany. Alc. 12.5%
I don't have any eloquent tasting notes, but the wine was
superb with the fish, and I'll have to try more Pinot
Grigio in the future. The wine was gifted to me and I don't
think it was very expensive.


Pinot Gris (or whatever other name one calls it) is interesting. I
feel like the bulk of these wines that I taste are truly insipid in
the sense of being almost flavorless.

But, I've had examples (some from Alsace, mostly from Oregon, but that
is probably because of proximity in my case) that are truly delightful
wines at very modest prices ($11-$15).

From the internet, I suspect the wine you had was in this price range,
though it doesn't seem that widely distributed.

An Oregon pinot gris that I like a lot and that seems to be widely
distributed (in some Costcos for example) is this one:

http://www.willamettevalleyvineyards...oducts/core/#3

It is under $12 in Costco.

Another Oregon winery that is big (for Oregon), and thus has some
national distribution in the US, and has a good pinot gris is King
Estate, but I think the Willamette Valley Vineyards one mentioned
above is a better value.

And there are lots of smaller Oregon vineyards with good pinot gris
(and lots of insipid pinot gris from Oregon, but a much better
proportion of good wine than the pinot grigios I see from Italy).



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Old 06-11-2009, 03:27 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default Pinot Grigio

On Nov 6, 6:49*am, "Anders Tørneskog"
wrote:
"Steve Slatcher" skrev i ... Bobchai wrote:

I never knew that pinot grigio
was being grown extensively in Germany


It not unusual, but I am not sure how extensively it is grown. *It is
usually called Grauburgunder or, more traditionally, Ruländer. *Never
heard of one being sold as Pinot Grigio before.


Wein-Plus lists Pinot Gris (with synonyms Grauburgunder and Ruländer) as
comprising 4.3% of the growing area in Germany - 4.413 hectares - about
11.000 acres, I believe


One of the traditional better known regions for this grape in Germany
is in Baden. In modern times the dry versions tend to be sold as
Grauburgunder and the sweeter versions as Rulander. I don't know about
Europe outside of Germany, but this wine in the higher quality form
does not seem to be easily available in many areas of the US. I still
have a few bottles of Bickensohler Steinfelsen Rulander Auslese 1976.
It is a very rich sweet wine with great intensity of taste and smell
and considerable complexity.

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Old 06-11-2009, 03:51 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default Pinot Grigio


"Anders Tørneskog" wrote in message
...
|
| "Steve Slatcher" skrev i melding
| ...
| Bobchai wrote:
|
| I never knew that pinot grigio
| was being grown extensively in Germany
|
| It not unusual, but I am not sure how extensively it is grown. It is
| usually called Grauburgunder or, more traditionally, Ruländer. Never
| heard of one being sold as Pinot Grigio before.
|
| Wein-Plus lists Pinot Gris (with synonyms Grauburgunder and Ruländer) as
| comprising 4.3% of the growing area in Germany - 4.413 hectares - about
| 11.000 acres, I believe
|
| Anders

At a tasting held by Ernst Loosen a few weeks ago we sampled Dr. Loosen's
Villa Wolf Pinot Gris; it was a convincing wine, quite comparable to the
majority of Italian Pinot Grigios, perhaps slightly lighter and more subtle.
Apparently they have grown PG for quite a while:
http://www.jlwolf.com/wines_vines.htm

"
Pinot Gris has a very long tradition in the Pfalz region. In fact, it was here that
the variety was first identified. Villa Wolf Pinot Gris is made in a full-bodied,
dry style with refreshing, unoaked fruit and a crackling texture."

pavane




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Old 06-11-2009, 09:19 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default Pinot Grigio

On Nov 6, 6:21*am, Doug Anderson
wrote:


Pinot Gris (or whatever other name one calls it) is interesting. *I
feel like the bulk of these wines that I taste are truly insipid in
the sense of being almost flavorless.

But, I've had examples (some from Alsace, mostly from Oregon, but that
is probably because of proximity in my case) that are truly delightful
wines at very modest prices ($11-$15).

From the internet, I suspect the wine you had was in this price range,
though it doesn't seem that widely distributed.

An Oregon pinot gris that I like a lot and that seems to be widely
distributed (in some Costcos for example) is this one:

http://www.willamettevalleyvineyards...oducts/core/#3

It is under $12 in Costco.

Another Oregon winery that is big (for Oregon), and thus has some
national distribution in the US, and has a good pinot gris is King
Estate, but I think the Willamette Valley Vineyards one mentioned
above is a better value.

And there are lots of smaller Oregon vineyards with good pinot gris
(and lots of insipid pinot gris from Oregon, but a much better
proportion of good wine than the pinot grigios I see from Italy).


Doug:

You have named two Oregon wineries where Oregon pinot gris may be as
good as it gets in America. So far.

Willakenzie in Oregon, if they make pinot gris, would be another
suggestion; I think they make consistently good wine overall (which is
unusual, considering the weather).

I firmly believe that pinot gris would be a successful grape for the
east coast, but there again, it's economics. Why grow a successful
pinot gris in New York, when you can sell mediocre cabernet, just
because of the name recognition, for three times the price? And even
at its best, New York pinot gris could never approach the greatness of
New York riesling, some of the finest and most under-rated wine in the
world.

If wine was a Goldman Sachs financial derivative, like phony stock
assets and phony real estate loans, I would bet on riesling and short
pinot gris.

Just saying.

--Bob

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Old 06-11-2009, 09:21 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default Pinot Grigio

On Nov 6, 7:27*am, cwdjrxyz wrote:
On Nov 6, 6:49*am, "Anders Tørneskog"
wrote:

"Steve Slatcher" skrev i ... Bobchai wrote:


I never knew that pinot grigio
was being grown extensively in Germany


It not unusual, but I am not sure how extensively it is grown. *It is
usually called Grauburgunder or, more traditionally, Ruländer. *Never
heard of one being sold as Pinot Grigio before.


Wein-Plus lists Pinot Gris (with synonyms Grauburgunder and Ruländer) as
comprising 4.3% of the growing area in Germany - 4.413 hectares - about
11.000 acres, I believe


One of the traditional better known regions for this grape in Germany
is in Baden. In modern times the dry versions tend to be sold as
Grauburgunder and the sweeter versions as Rulander. I don't know about
Europe outside of Germany, but this wine in the higher quality form
does not seem to be easily available in many areas of the US. I still
have a few bottles of Bickensohler Steinfelsen Rulander Auslese 1976.
It is a very rich sweet wine with great intensity of taste and smell
and considerable complexity.


cwdjirxz:

I never thought of pinot gris as a late harvest wine. It sounds very
interesting!

--Bob

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Old 06-11-2009, 09:27 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default Pinot Grigio

On Nov 6, 7:51*am, "pavane" wrote:


At a tasting held by Ernst Loosen a few weeks ago we sampled Dr. Loosen's
Villa Wolf Pinot Gris; it was a convincing wine, quite comparable to the
majority of Italian Pinot Grigios, perhaps slightly lighter and more subtle.
Apparently they have grown PG for quite a while:http://www.jlwolf.com/wines_vines.htm

"
Pinot Gris has a very long tradition in the Pfalz region. In fact, it was here that
the variety was first identified. Villa Wolf Pinot Gris is made in a full-bodied,
dry style with refreshing, unoaked fruit and a crackling texture."

pavane


Pavane:

This is music to my ears. It confirms my suspicion that Germany,
Austria and Hungary might be the best places for pinot gris/pinot
grigio. I have a lot of contacts in Hungary. The area around Sopron
and Balaton would be ideal, but I don't know what the grape is called
in Hungarian.

--Bob




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Old 06-11-2009, 09:52 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default Pinot Grigio

Bobchai writes:

On Nov 6, 6:21*am, Doug Anderson
wrote:


Pinot Gris (or whatever other name one calls it) is interesting. *I
feel like the bulk of these wines that I taste are truly insipid in
the sense of being almost flavorless.

But, I've had examples (some from Alsace, mostly from Oregon, but that
is probably because of proximity in my case) that are truly delightful
wines at very modest prices ($11-$15).

From the internet, I suspect the wine you had was in this price range,
though it doesn't seem that widely distributed.

An Oregon pinot gris that I like a lot and that seems to be widely
distributed (in some Costcos for example) is this one:

http://www.willamettevalleyvineyards...oducts/core/#3

It is under $12 in Costco.

Another Oregon winery that is big (for Oregon), and thus has some
national distribution in the US, and has a good pinot gris is King
Estate, but I think the Willamette Valley Vineyards one mentioned
above is a better value.

And there are lots of smaller Oregon vineyards with good pinot gris
(and lots of insipid pinot gris from Oregon, but a much better
proportion of good wine than the pinot grigios I see from Italy).


Doug:

You have named two Oregon wineries where Oregon pinot gris may be as
good as it gets in America. So far.

Willakenzie in Oregon, if they make pinot gris, would be another
suggestion; I think they make consistently good wine overall (which is
unusual, considering the weather).


They do make a pinot gris. It sells for a bit more than the two I
mentioned but in my very limited experience isn't any better.

Willakenzie's pinot noirs on the other hand can be really excellent.
(Much more to my taste than pinot noirs from the other two vineyards I
mentioned.)
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Old 06-11-2009, 10:03 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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"Mike Tommasi" skrev i melding
...
Pavane:

This is music to my ears. It confirms my suspicion that Germany,
Austria and Hungary might be the best places for pinot gris/pinot
grigio. I have a lot of contacts in Hungary. The area around Sopron
and Balaton would be ideal, but I don't know what the grape is called
in Hungarian.


Szürkebarát

Which means Grey Monk ('Grauer Mönch' in German).

Anders


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Old 07-11-2009, 03:33 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Mike Tommasi wrote:

Szürkebarát


Which means Grey Monk ('Grauer Mönch' in German).


I suppose that is an Austrian name, given the proximity?


No. "Szürkebarát" means grey monk or grey priest.

Here in Austria both Pinot Gris and Grauburgunder are used,
Ruländer much less so.

M.
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Old 16-11-2009, 04:36 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default Pinot Grigio

Hi,

On Fri, 6 Nov 2009 13:27:22 -0800 (PST), Bobchai
wrote:

On Nov 6, 7:51*am, "pavane" wrote:


This is music to my ears. It confirms my suspicion that Germany,
Austria and Hungary might be the best places for pinot gris/pinot
grigio. I have a lot of contacts in Hungary. The area around Sopron
and Balaton would be ideal, but I don't know what the grape is called
in Hungarian.


As others have said, Szürkebarát. I've not heard of it doing that
well in Sopron where the kékfrankos (blue french) is the traditional
grape grown.

However on the northern side of Lake Balaton, (therefore on south
facing slopes) the volcani hill of Badacsony produces Baacsonyi
Szürkebarát which was one of the top Hungarian wines IMO. It was THE
quintessential "difficult food" wine, accompanying the rich and spicy
type of hungarian food to perfection. When I last visited the area, it
was impossible to find a decent example, but maybe one day the local
growers will find their feet again and start producing a wine that
fulfils its potential.

I'd love to try one against chinese or indian food, because that's the
wine I always think of in that context, and which I have to sub an
Alsace Gewurz in place of.

(Yeuch, sorry about the frightful grammar).
,
--
All the best
Fatty from Forges
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Old 23-11-2009, 11:57 AM posted to alt.food.wine
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IanH wrote:

I'd love to try one [Badacsony Szürkebarat] against chinese or
indian food, because that's the wine I always think of in that
context, and which I have to sub an Alsace Gewurz in place of.


Try a powerful Grüner Veltliner (13% or up): Does exceptionally
well.

M.


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