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Old 06-07-2008, 11:20 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default TN: 1986 Trevallon

This bottle (the last) was in good condition with a high fill. Marked
"Les Baux" AOC Coteaux d'Aix en
Provence. 12% alcohol, surely a rarity now. The label says Imported by
Ideal Wine Medford Ma
(printed on the label, don't know if they were the only importer then)
and as I recall it was quite
expensive, perhaps $15 US in '89. IIRC I bought this from Marty's
Liquor in Newton (was living
in Watertown at the time).

An excellent cork, good dark color but getting a little brickish. The
nose is huge, with black
fruits, garrigue, spice. In mouth a great balance, fully mature with
plums and black cherry, tar
and tons of liquorish, saddle leather. Strangely Bordeaux-like. Very
good length. If any fault
could be found, perhaps a little too low acid for my tastes.

As the meal, simple rare roast beef with mashed potatoes and fresh
picked string beans, went
on, the wine fell apart a little: shortened up, started showing a little
bell pepper on the front etc.
Still pleasurable but clearly showing age.

We didn't decant or let breath. A delicious bottle, but if you're lucky
enough to have some,
drink up.

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Old 08-07-2008, 12:53 AM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default TN: 1986 Trevallon

In article ,
Emery Davis wrote:

This bottle (the last) was in good condition with a high fill. Marked
"Les Baux" AOC Coteaux d'Aix en
Provence. 12% alcohol, surely a rarity now. The label says Imported by
Ideal Wine Medford Ma
(printed on the label, don't know if they were the only importer then)
and as I recall it was quite
expensive, perhaps $15 US in '89. IIRC I bought this from Marty's
Liquor in Newton (was living
in Watertown at the time).

An excellent cork, good dark color but getting a little brickish. The
nose is huge, with black
fruits, garrigue, spice. In mouth a great balance, fully mature with
plums and black cherry, tar
and tons of liquorish, saddle leather. Strangely Bordeaux-like. Very
good length. If any fault
could be found, perhaps a little too low acid for my tastes.

As the meal, simple rare roast beef with mashed potatoes and fresh
picked string beans, went
on, the wine fell apart a little: shortened up, started showing a little
bell pepper on the front etc.
Still pleasurable but clearly showing age.

We didn't decant or let breath. A delicious bottle, but if you're lucky
enough to have some,
drink up.


Thanks for the notes. Just one question, what does garrigue smell like?
Isn't it a bush?
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Old 08-07-2008, 05:37 AM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default TN: 1986 Trevallon

Lawrence Leichtman wrote:


Thanks for the notes. Just one question, what does garrigue smell like?
Isn't it a bush?


Garrigue is a term for the herbs that grow wild in coastal Provence.
Lavendar, sage, wild thyme and rosemary are the principal components.
If you walk along the Mediterranean coast of France, you'll encounter
these plants growing in the arid limestone soils and on hot summer days
their scent is quite evident.

Mark Lipton


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Old 08-07-2008, 01:28 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default TN: 1986 Trevallon

Mike Tommasi wrote:
Mark Lipton wrote:
Lawrence Leichtman wrote:

Thanks for the notes. Just one question, what does garrigue smell
like? Isn't it a bush?


Garrigue is a term for the herbs that grow wild in coastal Provence.
Lavendar, sage, wild thyme and rosemary are the principal components.
If you walk along the Mediterranean coast of France, you'll encounter
these plants growing in the arid limestone soils and on hot summer days
their scent is quite evident.


You are quite right. The limestone soil is the key differentiating
factor between "garrigue" (Languedoc, Provence) and the slightly
different flora found in the "maquis" (Corsica) with its characteristic
acid silica soils.



It really is a very evocative scent. You can practically feel the sun
on your
neck...

For the record, and as Mike no doubt knows, "maquis" refers to any backwoods
that is wild. Further, les maquis (or maquisards) is used to refer to a
guerrilla group
(e.g. the farc) living in the backwoods. (I've never heard maquis as a
scent descriptive,
but there's lots I haven't heard...)

Here there is some justified pride in WWII resistance, notably by the
renowned
Maquis de Tanville (next village over) or the Maquis du Bois de
l'Eveque, the very
forest that surrounds our house.

Some interesting information about these maquis can be found at
http://beaucoudray.free.fr/gestapo.htm, in French but easily translatable by
google etc.

I often think of the Maire of Tanville, shot for his silence and
loyalty, when
some ignorant idiot starts on about surrender monkeys.

-E
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Old 08-07-2008, 09:07 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default TN: 1986 Trevallon

On Jul 6, 6:20�pm, Emery Davis wrote:
This bottle (the last) was in good condition with a high fill. �Marked
"Les Baux" AOC Coteaux d'Aix en
Provence. �12% alcohol, surely a rarity now. �The label says Imported by
Ideal Wine Medford Ma
(printed on the label, don't know if they were the only importer then)
and as I recall it was quite
expensive, perhaps $15 US in '89. �IIRC I bought this from Marty's
Liquor in Newton (was living
in Watertown at the time).

An excellent cork, good dark color but getting a little brickish. �The
nose is huge, with black
fruits, garrigue, spice. �In mouth a great balance, fully mature with
plums and black cherry, tar
and tons of liquorish, saddle leather. �Strangely Bordeaux-like. �Very
good length. �If any fault
could be found, perhaps a little too low acid for my tastes.

As the meal, simple rare roast beef with mashed potatoes and fresh
picked string beans, went
on, the wine fell apart a little: shortened up, started showing a little
bell pepper on the front etc.
Still pleasurable but clearly showing age.

We didn't decant or let breath. �A delicious bottle, but if you're lucky
enough to have some,
drink up.


Emery,
Is this the Cab/Syrah blend? I haven't had a wine that old from
Aix but I remember drinking a few bottles of Cabernet from AOC Var
made by Americans no less that were quite good.


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Old 09-07-2008, 02:43 AM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default TN: 1986 Trevallon


"Mark Lipton" wrote in message
...
Lawrence Leichtman wrote:


Thanks for the notes. Just one question, what does garrigue smell like?
Isn't it a bush?


Garrigue is a term for the herbs that grow wild in coastal Provence.
Lavendar, sage, wild thyme and rosemary are the principal components.
If you walk along the Mediterranean coast of France, you'll encounter
these plants growing in the arid limestone soils and on hot summer days
their scent is quite evident.

More or less a bouquet garni.
Graham


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Old 09-07-2008, 08:24 AM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default TN: 1986 Trevallon

Mike Tommasi wrote:
Bi!! wrote:

Emery,
Is this the Cab/Syrah blend? I haven't had a wine that old from
Aix but I remember drinking a few bottles of Cabernet from AOC Var
made by Americans no less that were quite good.


It is a wine with a large Cab component, which disqualifies it from the
appellation Les Baux (not Aix...) despite Trevallon having more or less
created the reputation of Les Baux...


It is cabernet/syrah. As Mike says certainly a large cabernet part, I'm
guessing at least 1/2, but I don't know the actual blend.

Another provencale wine rumored to live forever is Richaume. (I think
Parker said it would go 30 years). I had an '85 in 2001, it was well
past peak, more so than the Trevallon.

So they make wine in the Var?

-E
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Old 09-07-2008, 04:04 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default TN: 1986 Trevallon

Mike Tommasi wrote:
Emery Davis wrote:

Another provencale wine rumored to live forever is Richaume. (I think
Parker said it would go 30 years). I had an '85 in 2001, it was well
past peak, more so than the Trevallon.

So they make wine in the Var?


Trevallon and Richaume are not in the Var, they are in the Bouches du
Rhne. You get much longer lasting wines in the Var: Bandol.


But not the part of the Bouches du Rhne that was renamed Costires de
Nmes?

Mark Lipton

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alt.food.wine FAQ: http://winefaq.hostexcellence.com


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