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Old 05-06-2008, 02:22 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default TN: Good not great wines still provide lots of pleasure (Burg, Mosel)

Tuesday we had a couple of very ripe mangoes, Betsy was planning on
doing a Ming Tsai recipe of spicy shrimp with mango and snow peas. But
a package arrived with 2 live lobsters (a thank you for babysitting
last week). So she just converted the recipe. With the sambal olek in
the dish I felt some residual sugar was needed, and opened the 2001
Meulenhof Erdener Treppchen Riesling Spätlese. Pretty open and ready,
fairly sweet but with that '01 acidic spine. Lots of primary peach
flavors, a little petrol and slate. Perfect wine for the dish,
handles the heat but rich enough for lobster. Not the most complex
Riesling, but satisfying for what it is. B

Yesterday's NYT has an article by Eric Asimov on Burgundy, with a
couple of Ma Cuisine recipes as accompaniment. Betsy decided to do the
spiced game hens. A very nice dish, though Betsy questioned the timing
from beginning, and it clearly isn't enough at 400°F to cook the birds
through. After the adjustments, we sat down to the birds with barley
and a garlicky spinach salad. I had found the 2005 Domaine Bart "Les
Champs Salomon" Marsannay tight and tart at opening a bit before. It
fleshed out a bit, and offering a nice accompaniment to the dinner.
Rather big cherry fruit, strong acids,light but persistent tannins. A
hint of damp earth and mushrooms with time. This never truly grabbed
me, but it went well with the dish and certainly was a solid bottle of
Marsannay. My guess is a few years would do it good. For today, B.

So 2 good but not great wines provided a lot of pleasure, as they
really went well with the dishes. Wine need not be great.


Grade disclaimer: I'm a very easy grader, basically A is an excellent
wine, B a good wine, C mediocre. Anything below C means I wouldn't
drink at a party where it was only choice. Furthermore, I offer no
promises of objectivity, accuracy, and certainly not of consistency.

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Old 05-06-2008, 10:45 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default TN: Good not great wines still provide lots of pleasure (Burg, Mosel)

In article
,
DaleW wrote:

Tuesday we had a couple of very ripe mangoes, Betsy was planning on
doing a Ming Tsai recipe of spicy shrimp with mango and snow peas. But
a package arrived with 2 live lobsters (a thank you for babysitting
last week). So she just converted the recipe. With the sambal olek in
the dish I felt some residual sugar was needed, and opened the 2001
Meulenhof Erdener Treppchen Riesling Spätlese. Pretty open and ready,
fairly sweet but with that '01 acidic spine. Lots of primary peach
flavors, a little petrol and slate. Perfect wine for the dish,
handles the heat but rich enough for lobster. Not the most complex
Riesling, but satisfying for what it is. B

Yesterday's NYT has an article by Eric Asimov on Burgundy, with a
couple of Ma Cuisine recipes as accompaniment. Betsy decided to do the
spiced game hens. A very nice dish, though Betsy questioned the timing
from beginning, and it clearly isn't enough at 400°F to cook the birds
through. After the adjustments, we sat down to the birds with barley
and a garlicky spinach salad. I had found the 2005 Domaine Bart "Les
Champs Salomon" Marsannay tight and tart at opening a bit before. It
fleshed out a bit, and offering a nice accompaniment to the dinner.
Rather big cherry fruit, strong acids,light but persistent tannins. A
hint of damp earth and mushrooms with time. This never truly grabbed
me, but it went well with the dish and certainly was a solid bottle of
Marsannay. My guess is a few years would do it good. For today, B.

So 2 good but not great wines provided a lot of pleasure, as they
really went well with the dishes. Wine need not be great.


Grade disclaimer: I'm a very easy grader, basically A is an excellent
wine, B a good wine, C mediocre. Anything below C means I wouldn't
drink at a party where it was only choice. Furthermore, I offer no
promises of objectivity, accuracy, and certainly not of consistency.


Interesting you should mention timing for cooking from recipes. I have
found that many recipes, especially from restaurant cook books, way
understate the time it takes to cook meats often by 50% or more. Do they
actually serve raw meat at their restaurants?
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Old 06-06-2008, 04:02 AM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default TN: Good not great wines still provide lots of pleasure (Burg,Mosel)

Lawrence Leichtman wrote:

Interesting you should mention timing for cooking from recipes. I have
found that many recipes, especially from restaurant cook books, way
understate the time it takes to cook meats often by 50% or more. Do they
actually serve raw meat at their restaurants?


Or do their ovens operate at higher temperatures? One of the things
I've noticed about home ranges is that their thermostats are unreliable
and the interior temperatures are often 10-50 °F lower than they are
supposed to be. Additionally, if the oven is small, it will take longer
to cook the meat than it would in a larger oven. A last possibility is
that their times are given for very rare, and that the cook is expected
to add time for greater doneness.

Just my $0.02,
Mark Lipton

--
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Old 06-06-2008, 01:10 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default TN: Good not great wines still provide lots of pleasure (Burg,Mosel)

On Jun 5, 11:02�pm, Mark Lipton wrote:
Lawrence Leichtman wrote:
Interesting you should mention timing for cooking from recipes. I have
found that many recipes, especially from restaurant cook books, way
understate the time it takes to cook meats often by 50% or more. Do they
actually serve raw meat at their restaurants?


Or do their ovens operate at higher temperatures? �One of the things
I've noticed about home ranges is that their thermostats are unreliable
and the interior temperatures are often 10-50 �F lower than they are
supposed to be. �Additionally, if the oven is small, it will take longer
to cook the meat than it would in a larger oven. �A last possibility is
that their times are given for very rare, and that the cook is expected
to add time for greater doneness.

Just my $0.02,
Mark Lipton

--
alt.food.wine FAQ: �http://winefaq.hostexcellence.com


We discussed whether maybe the opening to baste lowered temps more
than in a restaurant oven. But I can't imagine that it would make as
much difference as this. I think there was a translation error, and
when it said bake 20 minutes, basting twice, it was bake and then
baste 20 minutes, twice.

In general, my experience is usually the opposite. I tend to cut
estimates of time from many cookbooks.
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Old 06-06-2008, 01:41 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default TN: Good not great wines still provide lots of pleasure (Burg, Mosel)

I have a grill that has infrared burners for searing that goes from 0 to
over 1000 deg F in about 30 seconds.

Want a rare burger that is absoluted charred on outside :-)


"Lawrence Leichtman" wrote in message
...
In article
,
DaleW wrote:

Tuesday we had a couple of very ripe mangoes, Betsy was planning on
doing a Ming Tsai recipe of spicy shrimp with mango and snow peas. But
a package arrived with 2 live lobsters (a thank you for babysitting
last week). So she just converted the recipe. With the sambal olek in
the dish I felt some residual sugar was needed, and opened the 2001
Meulenhof Erdener Treppchen Riesling Spätlese. Pretty open and ready,
fairly sweet but with that '01 acidic spine. Lots of primary peach
flavors, a little petrol and slate. Perfect wine for the dish,
handles the heat but rich enough for lobster. Not the most complex
Riesling, but satisfying for what it is. B

Yesterday's NYT has an article by Eric Asimov on Burgundy, with a
couple of Ma Cuisine recipes as accompaniment. Betsy decided to do the
spiced game hens. A very nice dish, though Betsy questioned the timing
from beginning, and it clearly isn't enough at 400°F to cook the birds
through. After the adjustments, we sat down to the birds with barley
and a garlicky spinach salad. I had found the 2005 Domaine Bart "Les
Champs Salomon" Marsannay tight and tart at opening a bit before. It
fleshed out a bit, and offering a nice accompaniment to the dinner.
Rather big cherry fruit, strong acids,light but persistent tannins. A
hint of damp earth and mushrooms with time. This never truly grabbed
me, but it went well with the dish and certainly was a solid bottle of
Marsannay. My guess is a few years would do it good. For today, B.

So 2 good but not great wines provided a lot of pleasure, as they
really went well with the dishes. Wine need not be great.


Grade disclaimer: I'm a very easy grader, basically A is an excellent
wine, B a good wine, C mediocre. Anything below C means I wouldn't
drink at a party where it was only choice. Furthermore, I offer no
promises of objectivity, accuracy, and certainly not of consistency.


Interesting you should mention timing for cooking from recipes. I have
found that many recipes, especially from restaurant cook books, way
understate the time it takes to cook meats often by 50% or more. Do they
actually serve raw meat at their restaurants?





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Old 06-06-2008, 02:54 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default TN: Good not great wines still provide lots of pleasure (Burg, Mosel)

Pretty cool huh!!!!

Its a really cool grill...has a routissere Infared also.

I have destroyed more meat learning to cook on it than I care to mention.

But I am finally learning how to control and the cooking times.

Probably a major cause of Global Warming. :-)
"Mike Tommasi" wrote in message
...
Richard Neidich wrote:
I have a grill that has infrared burners for searing that goes from 0 to
over 1000 deg F in about 30 seconds.


In France even our nuclear powered ranges don't respond that fast.

--
Mike Tommasi - Six Fours, France
email link http://www.tommasi.org/mymail



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Old 10-06-2008, 08:45 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default TN: Good not great wines still provide lots of pleasure (Burg, Mosel)

In article , Mark Lipton
wrote:

Lawrence Leichtman wrote:

Interesting you should mention timing for cooking from recipes. I have
found that many recipes, especially from restaurant cook books, way
understate the time it takes to cook meats often by 50% or more. Do they
actually serve raw meat at their restaurants?


Or do their ovens operate at higher temperatures? One of the things
I've noticed about home ranges is that their thermostats are unreliable
and the interior temperatures are often 10-50 °F lower than they are
supposed to be. Additionally, if the oven is small, it will take longer
to cook the meat than it would in a larger oven. A last possibility is
that their times are given for very rare, and that the cook is expected
to add time for greater doneness.

Just my $0.02,
Mark Lipton


I use a thermometer in my oven to check on temps and I am about 1-2º off
but that is a Wolfe Stove. My oven is about the same size as commercial.
If they are going for rare why not say nearly raw and you should cook it
more.
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Old 10-06-2008, 08:46 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 651
Default TN: Good not great wines still provide lots of pleasure (Burg, Mosel)

In article
,
DaleW wrote:

On Jun 5, 11:02?pm, Mark Lipton wrote:
Lawrence Leichtman wrote:
Interesting you should mention timing for cooking from recipes. I have
found that many recipes, especially from restaurant cook books, way
understate the time it takes to cook meats often by 50% or more. Do they
actually serve raw meat at their restaurants?


Or do their ovens operate at higher temperatures? ?One of the things
I've noticed about home ranges is that their thermostats are unreliable
and the interior temperatures are often 10-50 ?F lower than they are
supposed to be. ?Additionally, if the oven is small, it will take longer
to cook the meat than it would in a larger oven. ?A last possibility is
that their times are given for very rare, and that the cook is expected
to add time for greater doneness.

Just my $0.02,
Mark Lipton

--
alt.food.wine FAQ: ?http://winefaq.hostexcellence.com


We discussed whether maybe the opening to baste lowered temps more
than in a restaurant oven. But I can't imagine that it would make as
much difference as this. I think there was a translation error, and
when it said bake 20 minutes, basting twice, it was bake and then
baste 20 minutes, twice.

In general, my experience is usually the opposite. I tend to cut
estimates of time from many cookbooks.


There are a few cookbooks that overestimate meat times but I often get
recipes from internet sites and they are notoriously wrong on timing.
Only Ming Tsai seems to get the timing right for me.
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Old 12-06-2008, 09:05 AM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default TN: Good not great wines still provide lots of pleasure (Burg, Mosel)

I'm afraid to ask how fast your Maserati goes.

JJ

On Fri, 6 Jun 2008 08:41:49 -0400, "Richard Neidich"
wrote:

I have a grill that has infrared burners for searing that goes from 0 to
over 1000 deg F in about 30 seconds.



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Old 12-06-2008, 12:15 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default TN: Good not great wines still provide lots of pleasure (Burg, Mosel)

wrote:

I'm afraid to ask how fast your Maserati goes.

JJ


My Maserati does 185...
I lost my license, now I don't drive...

--
There's a fine line between stupid and clever.


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