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Old 24-12-2007, 05:19 AM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default TN Carema 1974, Luigi Ferrando

Carema comes from a very small DOC in the northwest Italian Piedmont
and borders the Valle d'Aosta. There are fewer than 13 ha of Nebbiolo
registered to Carema. Carema is very highly regarded by many, but
since there is so little of it, many have never tasted it, especially
when mature. The DOC requires a minimum of 85% Nebbiolo grapes,
although the only two present producers, Ferrando and a coop, use 100%
Nebbiolo today. I do not know what they did in 1974. Fortunately both
producers have a good reputation today. Luigi Ferrando's two sons,
Roberto and Andrea now run the winery with him. Only about 10000
bottles of Carema are produced by them per year, and about 1/2 of
these are exported to the US. Roberto Ferrando explains that while
Carema does not have the muscle of Barolo, it brings out the floral
and earthy character of Nebbiolo. Because the vineyards are much
further north and at an elevation of up to 550 m, the acidity level in
Carema is higher than wines from Laghe. The wines often require time
to evolve. Carema tends to be even slower to evolve than classic
Barolo and Barbaresco. At the present time Ferrando also makes a
little riserva in the best years, and this gets some barrique ageing.
I found this detailed information in Italy 2008, a Decanter guide that
came with the Jan. 2008 issue of Decanter.

I found a little Carema back in the 1970s. It was very acid when
young, and I did not then know that it often required long ageing to
become civilized and attractive. I only kept a bottle of the mentioned
1974, and forgot about it until I read Italy 2008.

The 1974 Carema from Ferrando was properly stored and had a good fill
and cork. The color is still fairly deep red with only traces of age
showing around the rim. It is quite clean with no trace of oxidation.
The body is not as intense as an old style Barolo that ages well and
the alcohol level is lower. However a very good bouquet and taste have
developed with perhaps more red fruit than in a Barolo, less dark
fruit, and less tar. The acid is now under control, but it is somewhat
more intense than in an average aged Barolo. I would say, although
different, the quality is the equal of many very good Barolos and
better than many Barolos. Perhaps the very best Barolos have more
complexity and a more impressive weight for those who like large
wines.

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Old 24-12-2007, 01:15 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default TN Carema 1974, Luigi Ferrando

On Dec 24, 12:19�am, cwdjrxyz wrote:
Carema comes from a very small DOC in the northwest Italian Piedmont
and borders the Valle d'Aosta. There are fewer than 13 ha of Nebbiolo
registered to Carema. Carema is very highly regarded by many, but
since there is so little of it, many have never tasted it, especially
when mature. The DOC requires a minimum of 85% Nebbiolo grapes,
although the only two present producers, Ferrando and a coop, use 100%
Nebbiolo today. I do not know what they did in 1974. Fortunately both
producers have a good reputation today. Luigi Ferrando's �two sons,
Roberto and Andrea now run the winery with him. Only about 10000
bottles of Carema are produced by them per year, and about 1/2 of
these are exported to the US. Roberto Ferrando explains that while
Carema does not have the muscle of Barolo, it brings out the floral
and earthy character of Nebbiolo. Because the vineyards are much
further north and at an elevation of up to 550 m, the acidity level in
Carema is �higher than wines from Laghe. The wines often require time
to evolve. Carema tends to be even slower to evolve than classic
Barolo and Barbaresco. At the present time Ferrando also makes a
little riserva in the best years, and this gets some barrique ageing.
I found this detailed information in Italy 2008, a Decanter guide that
came with the Jan. 2008 issue of Decanter.

I found a little Carema back in the 1970s. It was very acid when
young, and I did not then know that it often required long ageing to
become civilized and attractive. I only kept a bottle of the mentioned
1974, and forgot about it until I read Italy 2008.

The 1974 Carema from Ferrando was properly stored and had a good fill
and cork. The color is still fairly deep red with only traces of age
showing around the rim. It is quite clean with no trace of oxidation.
The body is not as intense as an old style Barolo that ages well and
the alcohol level is lower. However a very good bouquet and taste have
developed with perhaps more red fruit than in a Barolo, less dark
fruit, and less tar. The acid is now under control, but it is somewhat
more intense than in an average aged Barolo. I would say, although
different, the quality is the equal of many very good Barolos and
better than many Barolos. Perhaps the very best Barolos have more
complexity and a more impressive weight for those who like large
wines.


This is the regular white label? The oldest I've had was about 20
years old (and lively). I've also had a couple of the Ferrando black
label Caremas, a kind of riserva only done in riper vintages. Thanks
for notes
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Old 24-12-2007, 05:06 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default TN Carema 1974, Luigi Ferrando

On Dec 24, 7:15 am, DaleW wrote:
On Dec 24, 12:19�am, cwdjrxyz wrote:



Carema comes from a very small DOC in the northwest Italian Piedmont
and borders the Valle d'Aosta. There are fewer than 13 ha of Nebbiolo
registered to Carema. Carema is very highly regarded by many, but
since there is so little of it, many have never tasted it, especially
when mature. The DOC requires a minimum of 85% Nebbiolo grapes,
although the only two present producers, Ferrando and a coop, use 100%
Nebbiolo today. I do not know what they did in 1974. Fortunately both
producers have a good reputation today. Luigi Ferrando's �two sons,
Roberto and Andrea now run the winery with him. Only about 10000
bottles of Carema are produced by them per year, and about 1/2 of
these are exported to the US. Roberto Ferrando explains that while
Carema does not have the muscle of Barolo, it brings out the floral
and earthy character of Nebbiolo. Because the vineyards are much
further north and at an elevation of up to 550 m, the acidity level in
Carema is �higher than wines from Laghe. The wines often require time
to evolve. Carema tends to be even slower to evolve than classic
Barolo and Barbaresco. At the present time Ferrando also makes a
little riserva in the best years, and this gets some barrique ageing.
I found this detailed information in Italy 2008, a Decanter guide that
came with the Jan. 2008 issue of Decanter.


I found a little Carema back in the 1970s. It was very acid when
young, and I did not then know that it often required long ageing to
become civilized and attractive. I only kept a bottle of the mentioned
1974, and forgot about it until I read Italy 2008.


The 1974 Carema from Ferrando was properly stored and had a good fill
and cork. The color is still fairly deep red with only traces of age
showing around the rim. It is quite clean with no trace of oxidation.
The body is not as intense as an old style Barolo that ages well and
the alcohol level is lower. However a very good bouquet and taste have
developed with perhaps more red fruit than in a Barolo, less dark
fruit, and less tar. The acid is now under control, but it is somewhat
more intense than in an average aged Barolo. I would say, although
different, the quality is the equal of many very good Barolos and
better than many Barolos. Perhaps the very best Barolos have more
complexity and a more impressive weight for those who like large
wines.


This is the regular white label? The oldest I've had was about 20
years old (and lively). I've also had a couple of the Ferrando black
label Caremas, a kind of riserva only done in riper vintages. Thanks
for notes


The label is cream colored(perhaps showing some age) with brown text.
The wine is not a riserva. I don't know if they were making a riserva
in some years in the mid 70s and earlier. I don't even know if the
general label design is the same as the current ones, as I have not
seen a bottle of Carema more recent than the 1974. The DOC was in
place in 1974 and it is mentioned on the label. The bottle I have was
imported by a firm in New York - Italian Selected Wines.
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Old 24-12-2007, 06:06 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default TN Carema 1974, Luigi Ferrando

On Dec 24, 12:06*pm, cwdjrxyz wrote:
On Dec 24, 7:15 am, DaleW wrote:





On Dec 24, 12:19�am, cwdjrxyz wrote:


Carema comes from a very small DOC in the northwest Italian Piedmont
and borders the Valle d'Aosta. There are fewer than 13 ha of Nebbiolo
registered to Carema. Carema is very highly regarded by many, but
since there is so little of it, many have never tasted it, especially
when mature. The DOC requires a minimum of 85% Nebbiolo grapes,
although the only two present producers, Ferrando and a coop, use 100%
Nebbiolo today. I do not know what they did in 1974. Fortunately both
producers have a good reputation today. Luigi Ferrando's �two sons,
Roberto and Andrea now run the winery with him. Only about 10000
bottles of Carema are produced by them per year, and about 1/2 of
these are exported to the US. Roberto Ferrando explains that while
Carema does not have the muscle of Barolo, it brings out the floral
and earthy character of Nebbiolo. Because the vineyards are much
further north and at an elevation of up to 550 m, the acidity level in
Carema is �higher than wines from Laghe. The wines often require time
to evolve. Carema tends to be even slower to evolve than classic
Barolo and Barbaresco. At the present time Ferrando also makes a
little riserva in the best years, and this gets some barrique ageing.
I found this detailed information in Italy 2008, a Decanter guide that
came with the Jan. 2008 issue of Decanter.


I found a little Carema back in the 1970s. It was very acid when
young, and I did not then know that it often required long ageing to
become civilized and attractive. I only kept a bottle of the mentioned
1974, and forgot about it until I read Italy 2008.


The 1974 Carema from Ferrando was properly stored and had a good fill
and cork. The color is still fairly deep red with only traces of age
showing around the rim. It is quite clean with no trace of oxidation.
The body is not as intense as an old style Barolo that ages well and
the alcohol level is lower. However a very good bouquet and taste have
developed with perhaps more red fruit than in a Barolo, less dark
fruit, and less tar. The acid is now under control, but it is somewhat
more intense than in an average aged Barolo. I would say, although
different, the quality is the equal of many very good Barolos and
better than many Barolos. Perhaps the very best Barolos have more
complexity and a more impressive weight for those who like large
wines.


This is the regular white label? The oldest I've had was about 20
years old (and lively). I've also had a couple of the Ferrando black
label Caremas, a kind of riserva only done in riper vintages. Thanks
for notes


The label is cream colored(perhaps showing some age) with brown text.
The wine is not a riserva. I don't know if they were making a riserva
in some years in the mid 70s and earlier. I don't even know if the
general label design is the same as the current ones, as I have not
seen a bottle of Carema more recent than the 1974. The DOC was in
place in 1974 and it is mentioned on the label. The bottle I have was
imported by a firm in New York - Italian Selected Wines.- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


That's the white label. The "Black Label" isn't designated as a
Riserva as such, I just meant it acts in a similar role.
Cellartracker shows Ferrando as making Black Labels as far back as
1964. What matters is that you had a good wine, of course!

http://www.cellartracker.com/wine.asp?iWine=276540


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