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Default TN 2004 Leoville Barton

Last night we grilled a huge (3") ribeye as well as some corn,
accompanied by a watercress salad. Wine was the 2004 Ch. Leoville-
Barton (St. Julien). Surprisingly open from the git-go (is that a real
word?). Rich, fleshy, ripe but with an acidic backbone. Tannins are
fine and ripe. Mostly cassis fruit, with a note of sweet licorice.
Some graphite on the finish. Lovely Medoc with lots of potential, I
need to cellar my remaining ones, but wow it's lovely now. Maybe I
should get more. I saved one glass for several hours later, still
showing fresh and structured,with some mocha notes. Best 2004 I've
tried. A-

Grade disclaimer: I'm a very easy grader, basically A is an excellent
wine, B a good wine, C mediocre. Anything below C means I wouldn't
drink at a party where it was only choice. Furthermore, I offer no
promises of objectivity, accuracy, and certainly not of consistency

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Default TN 2004 Leoville Barton

On Sun, 19 Aug 2007 15:20:21 -0000, DaleW > wrote:

>Last night we grilled a huge (3") ribeye as well as some corn,
>accompanied by a watercress salad.


Must be a cultural thing, NYC versus fly-over country.

I hope you mean it was 3 inches thick or maybe 3 pounds in weight.
Here in TX, if someone put a 3" steak on a plate it needs a lot of
stuff around it to cover for the lack of substance. ;-)

> Wine was the 2004 Ch. Leoville-
>Barton (St. Julien). Surprisingly open from the git-go (is that a real
>word?).


"Git-go" is absolutely a real word. We use it here in Texoma to denote
the actual commencement point of an activity which we have previously
said we were "fixin to" do.

>Rich, fleshy, ripe but with an acidic backbone. Tannins are
>fine and ripe. Mostly cassis fruit, with a note of sweet licorice.
>Some graphite on the finish. Lovely Medoc with lots of potential, I
>need to cellar my remaining ones, but wow it's lovely now. Maybe I
>should get more. I saved one glass for several hours later, still
>showing fresh and structured,with some mocha notes. Best 2004 I've
>tried. A-


Had to look when I saw the subject header. St Julien has always been
on my short list of approachable and affordable Bdx. Thought you might
be pressing the infanticide point with an '04, but now will get
scouting for some while it still might be available on dealer's
shelves.

Ed Rasimus
Fighter Pilot (USAF-Ret)
"When Thunder Rolled"
www.thunderchief.org
www.thundertales.blogspot.com
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Default TN 2004 Leoville Barton

On 2007-08-19 08:20:21 -0700, DaleW > said:

> . Mostly cassis fruit, with a note of sweet licorice.
> Some graphite on the finish.


I often wonder how people know what things like graphite taste like.
Do people go around sucking rocks so they are better able to describe
wine?? :-)

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Default TN 2004 Leoville Barton


"DaleW" > wrote in message
ups.com...
> Last night we grilled a huge (3") ribeye as well as some corn,
> accompanied by a watercress salad. Wine was the 2004 Ch. Leoville-
> Barton (St. Julien). Surprisingly open from the git-go (is that a real
> word?). Rich, fleshy, ripe but with an acidic backbone. Tannins are
> fine and ripe. Mostly cassis fruit, with a note of sweet licorice.
> Some graphite on the finish. Lovely Medoc with lots of potential, I
> need to cellar my remaining ones, but wow it's lovely now. Maybe I
> should get more. I saved one glass for several hours later, still
> showing fresh and structured,with some mocha notes. Best 2004 I've
> tried. A-
>
> Grade disclaimer: I'm a very easy grader, basically A is an excellent
> wine, B a good wine, C mediocre. Anything below C means I wouldn't
> drink at a party where it was only choice. Furthermore, I offer no
> promises of objectivity, accuracy, and certainly not of consistency
>



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Default TN 2004 Leoville Barton

.. Wine was the 2004 Ch. Leoville-
> Barton (St. Julien).


Bloody hell Dale, thats quick off the mark. I have a case but still awaiting
its arrival.

None of us will be disappointed in Barton 2004, ( and at a reasonable price)

JT




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Default TN 2004 Leoville Barton

On Aug 19, 12:06?pm, Ed Rasimus > wrote:
> On Sun, 19 Aug 2007 15:20:21 -0000, DaleW > wrote:
> >Last night we grilled a huge (3") ribeye as well as some corn,
> >accompanied by a watercress salad.

>
> Must be a cultural thing, NYC versus fly-over country.
>
> I hope you mean it was 3 inches thick or maybe 3 pounds in weight.
> Here in TX, if someone put a 3" steak on a plate it needs a lot of
> stuff around it to cover for the lack of substance. ;-)
>
> > Wine was the 2004 Ch. Leoville-
> >Barton (St. Julien). Surprisingly open from the git-go (is that a real
> >word?).

>
> "Git-go" is absolutely a real word. We use it here in Texoma to denote
> the actual commencement point of an activity which we have previously
> said we were "fixin to" do.
>
> >Rich, fleshy, ripe but with an acidic backbone. Tannins are
> >fine and ripe. Mostly cassis fruit, with a note of sweet licorice.
> >Some graphite on the finish. Lovely Medoc with lots of potential, I
> >need to cellar my remaining ones, but wow it's lovely now. Maybe I
> >should get more. I saved one glass for several hours later, still
> >showing fresh and structured,with some mocha notes. Best 2004 I've
> >tried. A-

>
> Had to look when I saw the subject header. St Julien has always been
> on my short list of approachable and affordable Bdx. Thought you might
> be pressing the infanticide point with an '04, but now will get
> scouting for some while it still might be available on dealer's
> shelves.
>
> Ed Rasimus
> Fighter Pilot (USAF-Ret)
> "When Thunder Rolled"
> www.thunderchief.org
> www.thundertales.blogspot.com


Ed,

I hope you mean it was 3 inches thick or maybe 3 pounds in weight.

It was about 3 inches thick (2.3 pounds). I've been using a Cooks
Illustrated method, reverse of the old sear then bake. Take a thick
steak (or smaller roast) at room temp. Season well. Put in a low
(225?F) oven till temp is about 95-100 (last night I think 25 minutes,
probably had steak a little too cool). Then do a good sear on grill.
Nice crust, usually nicely rare to medium-rare (warm just off-red
center). A tad doner last night, I got lazy and put in oven in a pan
instead of on a roasting rack, one side was grey, though it browned
nicely.


Thought you might be pressing the infanticide point with an '04, but
now will get
scouting for some while it still might be available on dealer's
shelves.

Of course it's infanticide. But my preferred method with Bordeaux is
to try a bottle young (generally with a hunk of red meat to compensate
for tannins) to get a sense of it (and how much more to buy). I'll
try- really I will- to hold others till really ready.

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Default TN 2004 Leoville Barton

On Aug 19, 1:10?pm, Ronin wrote:
> On 2007-08-19 08:20:21 -0700, DaleW > said:
>
> > . Mostly cassis fruit, with a note of sweet licorice.
> > Some graphite on the finish.

>
> I often wonder how people know what things like graphite taste like.
> Do people go around sucking rocks so they are better able to describe
> wine?? :-)


(I don't know what to call you, sorry)
Well, I think Gary Vaynerchuk (sp?) did on David Letterman. But I
personally have stuck quite a few pencil leads on my tongue over the
years. Pencils and graphite dust lubricant are pretty widespread.

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Default TN 2004 Leoville Barton

So, when you say barnyard funk you also mean you have ate "shit" also. :-)

"DaleW" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> On Aug 19, 1:10?pm, Ronin wrote:
>> On 2007-08-19 08:20:21 -0700, DaleW > said:
>>
>> > . Mostly cassis fruit, with a note of sweet licorice.
>> > Some graphite on the finish.

>>
>> I often wonder how people know what things like graphite taste like.
>> Do people go around sucking rocks so they are better able to describe
>> wine?? :-)

>
> (I don't know what to call you, sorry)
> Well, I think Gary Vaynerchuk (sp?) did on David Letterman. But I
> personally have stuck quite a few pencil leads on my tongue over the
> years. Pencils and graphite dust lubricant are pretty widespread.
>



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Default TN 2004 Leoville Barton

Ed Rasimus wrote:
> I hope you mean it was 3 inches thick or maybe 3 pounds in weight.
> Here in TX, if someone put a 3" steak on a plate it needs a lot of
> stuff around it to cover for the lack of substance. ;-)
>
> Ed Rasimus
> Fighter Pilot (USAF-Ret)
> "When Thunder Rolled"
> www.thunderchief.org
> www.thundertales.blogspot.com



We all know that in Texas 3 inches is really an inch and a half Ed.
Women lie to you


--
Lew/+Silat


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Default TN 2004 Leoville Barton

In article >, Ronin wrote:

> On 2007-08-19 08:20:21 -0700, DaleW > said:
>
> > . Mostly cassis fruit, with a note of sweet licorice.
> > Some graphite on the finish.

>
> I often wonder how people know what things like graphite taste like.
> Do people go around sucking rocks so they are better able to describe
> wine?? :-)


Actually, yes. Sticking clean rocks in your mouth is not a bad way to
develop your palate as long as the rocks aren't sharp. Pencil lead or
graphite is in every kid's collective memory and if not sniff a number 2
pencil especially right after sharpening it and you often will get some
cedar as well.


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Default TN 2004 Leoville Barton

On Aug 28, 1:01?pm, Lawrence Leichtman > wrote:
> In article >, Ronin wrote:
> > On 2007-08-19 08:20:21 -0700, DaleW > said:

>
> > > . Mostly cassis fruit, with a note of sweet licorice.
> > > Some graphite on the finish.

>
> > I often wonder how people know what things like graphite taste like.
> > Do people go around sucking rocks so they are better able to describe
> > wine?? :-)

>
> Actually, yes. Sticking clean rocks in your mouth is not a bad way to
> develop your palate as long as the rocks aren't sharp. Pencil lead or
> graphite is in every kid's collective memory and if not sniff a number 2
> pencil especially right after sharpening it and you often will get some
> cedar as well.


I recall during my first trip to Burgundy many years ago, I actually
tasted the soil at different places to get a sense of what some of the
flavor components were. The red soil at Gevrey was the one that I
still recall to this day.

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Default TN 2004 Leoville Barton

On 2007-08-28 12:00:56 -0700, Bi!! > said:

> On Aug 28, 1:01?pm, Lawrence Leichtman > wrote:
>> In article >, Ronin wrote:
>>> On 2007-08-19 08:20:21 -0700, DaleW > said:

>>
>>>> . Mostly cassis fruit, with a note of sweet licorice.
>>>> Some graphite on the finish.

>>
>>> I often wonder how people know what things like graphite taste like.
>>> Do people go around sucking rocks so they are better able to describe
>>> wine?? :-)

>>
>> Actually, yes. Sticking clean rocks in your mouth is not a bad way to
>> develop your palate as long as the rocks aren't sharp. Pencil lead or
>> graphite is in every kid's collective memory and if not sniff a number 2
>> pencil especially right after sharpening it and you often will get some
>> cedar as well.

>
> I recall during my first trip to Burgundy many years ago, I actually
> tasted the soil at different places to get a sense of what some of the
> flavor components were. The red soil at Gevrey was the one that I
> still recall to this day.


Was that because of some "barnyard funk" you found in the soil? :-)

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