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Old 14-07-2007, 03:55 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default Lunch Wines

Monthly blind tasting lunch notes

Carles Andreu Cava Brut (nv) - excellent persistent mousse, lots of
green apple in the nose, finishes just very slightly off dry with good
acidity. Nice Cava.

1998 Champagne Lenoble Brut Rose- a pinkie made from 80% chard 20% PN.
No apples in the nose here - it was all strawberry ( or some thought
raspberry). Nice.

2000 Louis Michel Chablis Prem. Cru Montee de Tonnerre - dry mineral
nose, soft, pleasant and possibly overly subtle in terms of flavour....

2004 Petales d'Osoyoos - BC Bordeaux blend made by affiliate of
Gruaud. Medium dark colour, a nose of ripe sweet fruit amply laced
with dill and a hefty whack of pepper which instantly lets it out of
being mistaken as Bordeaux.. Decent wine at $25 Can.

1989 Ch. Haut Batailley - I'd had this wine young when it was all
about fruit, but hadn't tried it for some years. This time around it
showed a slightly perfumed nose otherwise typical fruit and a bit of
oak, and on palate, while it still had sufficient fruit it was no
longer lavish, ending with good length, quite dry. Quite a change but
still a nice claret.

2000 Ch. Lanessan - this usually modest Haut Medoc showed quite well.
Dark, with a sweet ripe fruit nose, and low acidity iot is ready to
roll - and that means I better start hunting my cellar for mine (I
also see I am supposed to have some 95 and a solitary, and probably
deceased 1978!)

1990 Ch. Montrose - I don't think I can recall a nose with as much
animal or Burgundian funk from a Bordeaux - a real barnyard
performance, but not off-putting at all, at least for me. While the
tannins seemed almost resolved on initial tasting, it was clear as
that perception changed with airing that there was still a strong
backbone to this wine - it stiffened up as you looked at it. Drinkable
now, it has a long life ahead. Should be about ready to drink by the
time I find mine in the cellar...

2000 Alban Grenache Eden Valley - this one had us all over the place
as we just couldn't' nail the varietal. Purple wine with a sweet nose,
and pretty good fruit, a tad flat in the middle, but ending well.

2001 Alban Reva Syrah - similar, but a step up in terms of nose -
sweeter, with the telltale black pepper, much more Rhonish and with
better length.

1999 Castello Banfi Brunello - good showing from the regular bottling
- dark with still firm tannins, but good fruit and excellent with food
at this point.

2000 Sette Ponti Oreno - ended with a Super Tuscan (cab, merlot and
sangio). Dark, with thick legs, a bit warm in the mouth and a marked
bitterness in the dry finish, this wine was relegated to last serving
position simply because the restaurant hadn't tasted it before, but it
worked out well as a cheese wine.


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Old 14-07-2007, 04:38 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default Lunch Wines

On Sat, 14 Jul 2007 07:55:53 -0700, "Bill S." wrote:

As usual, your "lunch" notes describe a gargantuan feast for the
senses that leaves me feeling sympathy pangs for a post-prandial
nap...possibly leading into tomorrow's breakfast. I come away envious
again.

But, this prompts a question:

2004 Petales d'Osoyoos - BC Bordeaux blend made by affiliate of
Gruaud. Medium dark colour, a nose of ripe sweet fruit amply laced
with dill and a hefty whack of pepper which instantly lets it out of
being mistaken as Bordeaux.. Decent wine at $25 Can.


Until about a year ago I never recall a conscious awareness of dill
notes in a wine. They might have been there, but certainly not in very
obvious concentration.

Now, in the last year it seems that I'm increasingly getting dill both
in aroma and taste in red wines, usually cabernet sauvignon or cab
blends. I first really became aware of it in some Becker Vineyards
wines (Rockwall TX) both cab and cab blend.

Then I found it in some Fife Petite Syrah and even a Ridge Zin.
Typically the dill comes on strong shortly after opening and then will
abate or blow off in a bit of time or with some swirling.

Is this a trend, a manifestation of terroir, a chemical reaction, a
wine-maker intent/error?
Ed Rasimus
Fighter Pilot (USAF-Ret)
"When Thunder Rolled"
www.thunderchief.org
www.thundertales.blogspot.com
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Old 14-07-2007, 05:07 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default Lunch Wines

On Jul 14, 11:38 am, Ed Rasimus wrote:


Then I found it in some Fife Petite Syrah and even a Ridge Zin.
Typically the dill comes on strong shortly after opening and then will
abate or blow off in a bit of time or with some swirling.

Is this a trend, a manifestation of terroir, a chemical reaction, a
wine-maker intent/error?


I was reading some different tastes in a particular wine within the
last week that did say there was a taste of dill. (Can't remember, of
course, where.)

So, my question is, is dill a common taste that previously has been
noted in reviews? Or rarely?

Thanks,
Dee Dee


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Old 14-07-2007, 05:30 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default Lunch Wines

I don;t know whether dill is a nose that has been used previously in
describing wines or not, but my reaction after reading Ed's excellent
description was of some minor VA (volatile acid). If so, I would
characterize it as a slight defect - slight, in that it dissipated
with some air.
I have made wines that suffered H2S problems that, even though I
thought I had correctd it, retained some mercaptans or disulfides that
leave a noticeable taint on the nose. But I have never thought of
those odors as 'dill' - there are some VA's that have a spicier note
that might be akin to a dill.


In article .com
DeeDee wrote:

On Jul 14, 11:38 am, Ed Rasimus wrote:


Then I found it in some Fife Petite Syrah and even a Ridge Zin.
Typically the dill comes on strong shortly after opening and then
will abate or blow off in a bit of time or with some swirling.

Is this a trend, a manifestation of terroir, a chemical reaction,
a wine-maker intent/error?


I was reading some different tastes in a particular wine within the
last week that did say there was a taste of dill. (Can't remember,
ofcourse, where.)

So, my question is, is dill a common taste that previously has
beennoted in reviews? Or rarely?

Thanks,
Dee Dee




--
I'm using an evaluation license of nemo since 49 days.
You should really try it!
http://www.malcom-mac.com/nemo

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Old 14-07-2007, 06:54 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default Lunch Wines

Ed Rasimus wrote:

Until about a year ago I never recall a conscious awareness of dill
notes in a wine. They might have been there, but certainly not in very
obvious concentration.

Now, in the last year it seems that I'm increasingly getting dill both
in aroma and taste in red wines, usually cabernet sauvignon or cab
blends. I first really became aware of it in some Becker Vineyards
wines (Rockwall TX) both cab and cab blend.


Ed,
I too have read descriptions of dill found in wines. What I've noted
is an association with the use of new (possibly American) oak. That
would certainly fit Ridge, since they use American oak cooperage, but I
can't say whether any of the other cases might be attributable to that.

Mark Lipton
--
alt.food.wine FAQ: http://winefaq.hostexcellence.com


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Old 14-07-2007, 07:51 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default Lunch Wines

On Jul 14, 1:54?pm, Mark Lipton wrote:
Ed Rasimus wrote:
Until about a year ago I never recall a conscious awareness of dill
notes in a wine. They might have been there, but certainly not in very
obvious concentration.


Now, in the last year it seems that I'm increasingly getting dill both
in aroma and taste in red wines, usually cabernet sauvignon or cab
blends. I first really became aware of it in some Becker Vineyards
wines (Rockwall TX) both cab and cab blend.


Ed,
I too have read descriptions of dill found in wines. What I've noted
is an association with the use of new (possibly American) oak. That
would certainly fit Ridge, since they use American oak cooperage, but I
can't say whether any of the other cases might be attributable to that.

Mark Lipton
--
alt.food.wine FAQ: http://winefaq.hostexcellence.com


I've found dill from time to time in California and Aussie wines in
particular. I recently drank a bottle of Wolf Blass Black Label 1994
that was loaded with dill. I noted that they used both French and
American oak but I've always attributed the dill to the American oak
which I find to be a bit more "sour" than French oak. If you've ever
smelled an untoasted barrel of American oak you would note the "sour"
smell that I'm reffering to.

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Old 14-07-2007, 07:53 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default Lunch Wines

On Jul 14, 10:55?am, "Bill S." wrote:
Monthly blind tasting lunch notes

Carles Andreu Cava Brut (nv) - excellent persistent mousse, lots of
green apple in the nose, finishes just very slightly off dry with good
acidity. Nice Cava.

1998 Champagne Lenoble Brut Rose- a pinkie made from 80% chard 20% PN.
No apples in the nose here - it was all strawberry ( or some thought
raspberry). Nice.

2000 Louis Michel Chablis Prem. Cru Montee de Tonnerre - dry mineral
nose, soft, pleasant and possibly overly subtle in terms of flavour....

2004 Petales d'Osoyoos - BC Bordeaux blend made by affiliate of
Gruaud. Medium dark colour, a nose of ripe sweet fruit amply laced
with dill and a hefty whack of pepper which instantly lets it out of
being mistaken as Bordeaux.. Decent wine at $25 Can.

1989 Ch. Haut Batailley - I'd had this wine young when it was all
about fruit, but hadn't tried it for some years. This time around it
showed a slightly perfumed nose otherwise typical fruit and a bit of
oak, and on palate, while it still had sufficient fruit it was no
longer lavish, ending with good length, quite dry. Quite a change but
still a nice claret.

2000 Ch. Lanessan - this usually modest Haut Medoc showed quite well.
Dark, with a sweet ripe fruit nose, and low acidity iot is ready to
roll - and that means I better start hunting my cellar for mine (I
also see I am supposed to have some 95 and a solitary, and probably
deceased 1978!)

1990 Ch. Montrose - I don't think I can recall a nose with as much
animal or Burgundian funk from a Bordeaux - a real barnyard
performance, but not off-putting at all, at least for me. While the
tannins seemed almost resolved on initial tasting, it was clear as
that perception changed with airing that there was still a strong
backbone to this wine - it stiffened up as you looked at it. Drinkable
now, it has a long life ahead. Should be about ready to drink by the
time I find mine in the cellar...

2000 Alban Grenache Eden Valley - this one had us all over the place
as we just couldn't' nail the varietal. Purple wine with a sweet nose,
and pretty good fruit, a tad flat in the middle, but ending well.

2001 Alban Reva Syrah - similar, but a step up in terms of nose -
sweeter, with the telltale black pepper, much more Rhonish and with
better length.

1999 Castello Banfi Brunello - good showing from the regular bottling
- dark with still firm tannins, but good fruit and excellent with food
at this point.

2000 Sette Ponti Oreno - ended with a Super Tuscan (cab, merlot and
sangio). Dark, with thick legs, a bit warm in the mouth and a marked
bitterness in the dry finish, this wine was relegated to last serving
position simply because the restaurant hadn't tasted it before, but it
worked out well as a cheese wine.


Great notes. I agree regarding the Montrose barnyard funk. I've had
it many times and even recently I drank it next to a 1990 Lafite and
it was by far stiffer and funkier but in a good way. Hope you find
your bottle before 2050.

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Old 24-07-2007, 08:55 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default Lunch Wines

In article .com,
Dee Dee wrote:

On Jul 14, 11:38 am, Ed Rasimus wrote:


Then I found it in some Fife Petite Syrah and even a Ridge Zin.
Typically the dill comes on strong shortly after opening and then will
abate or blow off in a bit of time or with some swirling.

Is this a trend, a manifestation of terroir, a chemical reaction, a
wine-maker intent/error?


I was reading some different tastes in a particular wine within the
last week that did say there was a taste of dill. (Can't remember, of
course, where.)

So, my question is, is dill a common taste that previously has been
noted in reviews? Or rarely?

Thanks,
Dee Dee


Sometimes I see with California wines especially cabs notes of dill or
mint that I think may be eucalyptus.
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Old 25-07-2007, 02:38 AM posted to alt.food.wine
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Posts: 281
Default Lunch Wines

Lawrence Leichtman wrote:

In article

.com,
Dee Dee wrote:

On Jul 14, 11:38 am, Ed Rasimus
wrote:


Then I found it in some Fife Petite Syrah
and even a Ridge Zin. Typically the dill
comes on strong shortly after opening and
then will abate or blow off in a bit of time
or with some swirling.

Is this a trend, a manifestation of terroir,
a chemical reaction, a wine-maker
intent/error?


I was reading some different tastes in a
particular wine within the
last week that did say there was a taste of
dill. (Can't remember, of course, where.)

So, my question is, is dill a common taste that
previously has been
noted in reviews? Or rarely?

Thanks,
Dee Dee


Sometimes I see with California wines especially
cabs notes of dill or mint that I think may be
eucalyptus.


The "Dill" could be mercaptans - not a plus - or
it could be hard tannins.

I am always amused by the descriptors of wine.

Most of the sensory descriptors used to describe a
wine come from the cooperage and or spoilage
organisms and NOT from the grape itself.

How many have tasted a wine aged in stainless and
with the proper amounts of SO2 to prevent
spoilage??? My guess is not many.

Without this experience, one really does not know
the difference between the characteristics of the
wine or the cooperage and or "Other"
contributors.

I grow my own wine and have been making wine for
decades. This is an invaluable experience and I
wish more could or would enjoy.


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