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Old 18-01-2007, 04:09 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default Folie a Deux Zinfandel

Last night, we made a simple marinated broiled flank steak with hash brown
potatoes, and asparagus wrapped in Prosciutto, sprinkled with grated
Asiago and good Extra Virgin Olive Oil. Not bad, if I do say so. ;-)

With it, I opened a Folie a Deux 2003 Amador County Zinfandel.
I was impressed with the forward plum and cherry nose and the pepper and
spice overtones. The body was almost syrupy, with glycerides running down
the glass. On the Davis scale, I would give it a 17 plus.

I am constantly amazed at how many styles are being created from the
Zinfandel grape. The only ones that I actively dislike are when the
winemaker attempts to reproduce a Claret. Why? why? Why?

Humming birds and ducks are both members of the aviary family.
Yet, I haven't seen too many ducks fly non-stop across the Gulf of Mexico
or Humming birds swimming in a lake.

Godzilla

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Old 18-01-2007, 04:34 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default Folie a Deux Zinfandel

Godzilla wrote:
Last night, we made a simple marinated broiled flank steak with hash brown
potatoes, and asparagus wrapped in Prosciutto, sprinkled with grated
Asiago and good Extra Virgin Olive Oil. Not bad, if I do say so. ;-)

With it, I opened a Folie a Deux 2003 Amador County Zinfandel.
I was impressed with the forward plum and cherry nose and the pepper and
spice overtones. The body was almost syrupy, with glycerides running down
the glass. On the Davis scale, I would give it a 17 plus.


I believe that '03 was the last vintage overseen by Scott Harvey at
Folie a Deux (before its purchase by Sutter Home). Scott has been one
of the foremost advocates of Amador County Zinfandel for decades now,
and he retained access to the Grandpere vineyard even after his
departure from Renwood. I doubt that more recent Folie a Deux Zins will
measure up to the one you had.


I am constantly amazed at how many styles are being created from the
Zinfandel grape. The only ones that I actively dislike are when the
winemaker attempts to reproduce a Claret. Why? why? Why?


Can you give a few examples of this style? To me, the most Claret-like
Zin I can think of is probably made by Storybook Mountain, but I happen
to quite like it. Perhaps you're thinking of a different style, though.

Mark Lipton
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Old 18-01-2007, 09:32 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default Folie a Deux Zinfandel

On Thu, 18 Jan 2007 11:34:03 -0500, Mark Lipton wrote:

Godzilla wrote:
Last night, we made a simple marinated broiled flank steak with hash brown
potatoes, and asparagus wrapped in Prosciutto, sprinkled with grated
Asiago and good Extra Virgin Olive Oil. Not bad, if I do say so. ;-)

With it, I opened a Folie a Deux 2003 Amador County Zinfandel.
I was impressed with the forward plum and cherry nose and the pepper and
spice overtones. The body was almost syrupy, with glycerides running down
the glass. On the Davis scale, I would give it a 17 plus.


I believe that '03 was the last vintage overseen by Scott Harvey at
Folie a Deux (before its purchase by Sutter Home). Scott has been one
of the foremost advocates of Amador County Zinfandel for decades now,
and he retained access to the Grandpere vineyard even after his
departure from Renwood. I doubt that more recent Folie a Deux Zins will
measure up to the one you had.


I am constantly amazed at how many styles are being created from the
Zinfandel grape. The only ones that I actively dislike are when the
winemaker attempts to reproduce a Claret. Why? why? Why?


Can you give a few examples of this style? To me, the most Claret-like
Zin I can think of is probably made by Storybook Mountain, but I happen
to quite like it. Perhaps you're thinking of a different style, though.

Mark Lipton


I only recall having several different Zins at tastings in years past
where they actually boasted of achieving a "claret" style, which I
consider inappropriate for this grape. Unfortunately, my database of
computer notes does not extend back that far. I do recall visiting the
Folie a Deux winery over twenty years ago and liking their limited
selection at that time, which I don't believe included Zinfandel.

Godzilla
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Old 18-01-2007, 09:34 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default Folie a Deux Zinfandel

For some reason I remember them always have Zin.

Amadour Zin to my memory from the beginning.


"Godzilla" wrote in message
...
On Thu, 18 Jan 2007 11:34:03 -0500, Mark Lipton wrote:

Godzilla wrote:
Last night, we made a simple marinated broiled flank steak with hash
brown
potatoes, and asparagus wrapped in Prosciutto, sprinkled with grated
Asiago and good Extra Virgin Olive Oil. Not bad, if I do say so. ;-)

With it, I opened a Folie a Deux 2003 Amador County Zinfandel.
I was impressed with the forward plum and cherry nose and the pepper and
spice overtones. The body was almost syrupy, with glycerides running
down
the glass. On the Davis scale, I would give it a 17 plus.


I believe that '03 was the last vintage overseen by Scott Harvey at
Folie a Deux (before its purchase by Sutter Home). Scott has been one
of the foremost advocates of Amador County Zinfandel for decades now,
and he retained access to the Grandpere vineyard even after his
departure from Renwood. I doubt that more recent Folie a Deux Zins will
measure up to the one you had.


I am constantly amazed at how many styles are being created from the
Zinfandel grape. The only ones that I actively dislike are when the
winemaker attempts to reproduce a Claret. Why? why? Why?


Can you give a few examples of this style? To me, the most Claret-like
Zin I can think of is probably made by Storybook Mountain, but I happen
to quite like it. Perhaps you're thinking of a different style, though.

Mark Lipton


I only recall having several different Zins at tastings in years past
where they actually boasted of achieving a "claret" style, which I
consider inappropriate for this grape. Unfortunately, my database of
computer notes does not extend back that far. I do recall visiting the
Folie a Deux winery over twenty years ago and liking their limited
selection at that time, which I don't believe included Zinfandel.

Godzilla



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Old 18-01-2007, 10:56 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default Folie a Deux Zinfandel

Mark,
Claret-styled zin is a rather inexact concept, but to me it means not
as fruit forward, less brawny, less noticable new oak, yet with some
structure. The producers I can think of who tend to get it right (for
my tastes) are ones like Dashe and Nalle, where they go for a
restrained style, yet are relatively faithful to the character of the
grape (you might include some of the Ridges,even). As opposed to the
big Baile/Renwood GrandPere style or superripe Turley or the light
fruity styled ones. There are wines I find attractive in most styles,
and ones I find unattractive in all styles.
Did you like Storybook? Never tried that I can remember

Mark Lipton wrote:

Can you give a few examples of this style? To me, the most Claret-like
Zin I can think of is probably made by Storybook Mountain, but I happen
to quite like it. Perhaps you're thinking of a different style, though.




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Old 19-01-2007, 12:55 AM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default Folie a Deux Zinfandel

On Thu, 18 Jan 2007 14:56:35 -0800, DaleW wrote:

Mark,
Claret-styled zin is a rather inexact concept, but to me it means not
as fruit forward, less brawny, less noticable new oak, yet with some
structure. The producers I can think of who tend to get it right (for
my tastes) are ones like Dashe and Nalle, where they go for a
restrained style, yet are relatively faithful to the character of the
grape (you might include some of the Ridges,even). As opposed to the
big Baile/Renwood GrandPere style or superripe Turley or the light
fruity styled ones. There are wines I find attractive in most styles,
and ones I find unattractive in all styles.
Did you like Storybook? Never tried that I can remember

Mark Lipton wrote:

Can you give a few examples of this style? To me, the most Claret-like
Zin I can think of is probably made by Storybook Mountain, but I happen
to quite like it. Perhaps you're thinking of a different style, though.


Our tastes in food, wine, coffee, art, music, etc. are highly individual
conclusions. I readily admit that "One mans meat is another's poison."
For example, many "experts" have long touted Schramsberg as being the
ultimate expression of California Sparkling Wine making. Somehow, on the
several occasions that I have had it, I didn't even find it enjoyable.
My description would be "A mouthful of excess carbonation, with very
little flavor elements."

Back in the days when I could afford it, I looked forward to our annual
seeing in the New Year with a bottle of Roederer Crystal, which I
considered the pinnacle of Champagne.

As for Zinfandel, I really did somersaults when I came across some
HELLACIOUS ACRES 1998 Necromancer Zinfandel. Some others may gag at this
style, and that is their right.

Drink to me only with thine eyes, -- etc. etc.

Godzilla
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Old 19-01-2007, 02:05 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default Folie a Deux Zinfandel

I agree that tastes are quite personal. Some of the folks I regularly
taste (cue for rant from you know who)with have stylistic preferences
quite opposed to my own, but I respect their tastes. Others I might
agree with in some regions, and not others. That's why looking at a
critic's points is pretty useless to me, while a combination of having
an idea of palate convergence AND actually reading the notes might give
one a clearer view.

Of course, beyond style, there are issues of quality, too. I've seen
"Claret-styled" used as an euphemism for "anemic" - within all styles
there are some wines that are better (for my tastes) than others.


Godzilla wrote:
On Thu, 18 Jan 2007 14:56:35 -0800, DaleW wrote:

Mark,
Claret-styled zin is a rather inexact concept, but to me it means not
as fruit forward, less brawny, less noticable new oak, yet with some
structure. The producers I can think of who tend to get it right (for
my tastes) are ones like Dashe and Nalle, where they go for a
restrained style, yet are relatively faithful to the character of the
grape (you might include some of the Ridges,even). As opposed to the
big Baile/Renwood GrandPere style or superripe Turley or the light
fruity styled ones. There are wines I find attractive in most styles,
and ones I find unattractive in all styles.
Did you like Storybook? Never tried that I can remember

Mark Lipton wrote:

Can you give a few examples of this style? To me, the most Claret-like
Zin I can think of is probably made by Storybook Mountain, but I happen
to quite like it. Perhaps you're thinking of a different style, though.


Our tastes in food, wine, coffee, art, music, etc. are highly individual
conclusions. I readily admit that "One mans meat is another's poison."
For example, many "experts" have long touted Schramsberg as being the
ultimate expression of California Sparkling Wine making. Somehow, on the
several occasions that I have had it, I didn't even find it enjoyable.
My description would be "A mouthful of excess carbonation, with very
little flavor elements."

Back in the days when I could afford it, I looked forward to our annual
seeing in the New Year with a bottle of Roederer Crystal, which I
considered the pinnacle of Champagne.

As for Zinfandel, I really did somersaults when I came across some
HELLACIOUS ACRES 1998 Necromancer Zinfandel. Some others may gag at this
style, and that is their right.

Drink to me only with thine eyes, -- etc. etc.

Godzilla


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Old 19-01-2007, 04:19 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default Folie a Deux Zinfandel

On Thu, 18 Jan 2007 19:55:44 -0500, Godzilla
wrote:

As for Zinfandel, I really did somersaults when I came across some
HELLACIOUS ACRES 1998 Necromancer Zinfandel. Some others may gag at this
style, and that is their right.

Drink to me only with thine eyes, -- etc. etc.

Godzilla


In these days of creative wine titling, that is a contender for the
championship. If I saw that on a shelf, it would jump into my cart
based on title alone.

What style was it, so I may gag or seek on my own?


Ed Rasimus
Fighter Pilot (USAF-Ret)
"When Thunder Rolled"
www.thunderchief.org
www.thundertales.blogspot.com
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Old 19-01-2007, 05:10 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default Folie a Deux Zinfandel

In article .com,
"DaleW" wrote:

Mark,
Claret-styled zin is a rather inexact concept, but to me it means not
as fruit forward, less brawny, less noticable new oak, yet with some
structure. The producers I can think of who tend to get it right (for
my tastes) are ones like Dashe and Nalle, where they go for a
restrained style, yet are relatively faithful to the character of the
grape (you might include some of the Ridges,even). As opposed to the
big Baile/Renwood GrandPere style or superripe Turley or the light
fruity styled ones. There are wines I find attractive in most styles,
and ones I find unattractive in all styles.
Did you like Storybook? Never tried that I can remember

Mark Lipton wrote:

Can you give a few examples of this style? To me, the most Claret-like
Zin I can think of is probably made by Storybook Mountain, but I happen
to quite like it. Perhaps you're thinking of a different style, though.


I'm not a fan of any of these wines to date. They seem to embrace the
worst of Zindandel and Cabernet and come out very harsh and unappealing
to me even when Ridge does it.
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Old 19-01-2007, 05:34 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default Folie a Deux Zinfandel

On Fri, 19 Jan 2007 16:19:28 +0000, Ed Rasimus wrote:

On Thu, 18 Jan 2007 19:55:44 -0500, Godzilla
wrote:

As for Zinfandel, I really did somersaults when I came across some
HELLACIOUS ACRES 1998 Necromancer Zinfandel. Some others may gag at this
style, and that is their right.

Drink to me only with thine eyes, -- etc. etc.

Godzilla


In these days of creative wine titling, that is a contender for the
championship. If I saw that on a shelf, it would jump into my cart
based on title alone.

What style was it, so I may gag or seek on my own?


Ed Rasimus
Fighter Pilot (USAF-Ret)
"When Thunder Rolled"
www.thunderchief.org
www.thundertales.blogspot.com


It was very fruit forward, thick, brambly, intensely concentrated , and I
am kicking myself for not grabbing every bottle that they had on the shelf
at the time.

Godzilla


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Old 19-01-2007, 05:37 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default Folie a Deux Zinfandel

On Fri, 19 Jan 2007 12:34:32 -0500, Godzilla
wrote:

On Fri, 19 Jan 2007 16:19:28 +0000, Ed Rasimus wrote:

On Thu, 18 Jan 2007 19:55:44 -0500, Godzilla
wrote:

As for Zinfandel, I really did somersaults when I came across some
HELLACIOUS ACRES 1998 Necromancer Zinfandel. Some others may gag at this
style, and that is their right.

Drink to me only with thine eyes, -- etc. etc.

Godzilla


In these days of creative wine titling, that is a contender for the
championship. If I saw that on a shelf, it would jump into my cart
based on title alone.

What style was it, so I may gag or seek on my own?


Ed Rasimus
Fighter Pilot (USAF-Ret)
"When Thunder Rolled"
www.thunderchief.org
www.thundertales.blogspot.com


It was very fruit forward, thick, brambly, intensely concentrated , and I
am kicking myself for not grabbing every bottle that they had on the shelf
at the time.

Godzilla


Should you shop for it again, be sure to defend yourself, as that is a
style I love and will compete vigorously for it should we be in the
same place at the same time.

Until then, I'll fill that square with Ridge late-picked or
late-harvest offerings when they are offered.

Ed Rasimus
Fighter Pilot (USAF-Ret)
"When Thunder Rolled"
www.thunderchief.org
www.thundertales.blogspot.com
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Old 19-01-2007, 05:40 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default Folie a Deux Zinfandel

On Fri, 19 Jan 2007 12:10:53 -0500, Lawrence Leichtman
wrote:

In article .com,
"DaleW" wrote:

Mark,
Claret-styled zin is a rather inexact concept, but to me it means not
as fruit forward, less brawny, less noticable new oak, yet with some
structure. The producers I can think of who tend to get it right (for
my tastes) are ones like Dashe and Nalle, where they go for a
restrained style, yet are relatively faithful to the character of the
grape (you might include some of the Ridges,even). As opposed to the
big Baile/Renwood GrandPere style or superripe Turley or the light
fruity styled ones. There are wines I find attractive in most styles,
and ones I find unattractive in all styles.
Did you like Storybook? Never tried that I can remember

Mark Lipton wrote:

Can you give a few examples of this style? To me, the most Claret-like
Zin I can think of is probably made by Storybook Mountain, but I happen
to quite like it. Perhaps you're thinking of a different style, though.


I'm not a fan of any of these wines to date. They seem to embrace the
worst of Zindandel and Cabernet and come out very harsh and unappealing
to me even when Ridge does it.


We might start a movement. Zinfandel is supposed to be a rich, warm,
spicy, fruit-forward mouth-filling, UNSUBTLE wine. Others may differ,
but as Marie Antoinette would have said, "Let them drink Bourdeaux".

Ditto for Shiraz.

Now, if we get to Pinot Noir, then I can go both ways...

Ed Rasimus
Fighter Pilot (USAF-Ret)
"When Thunder Rolled"
www.thunderchief.org
www.thundertales.blogspot.com


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