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Old 04-11-2006, 06:53 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default Oregon Wine Article.

http://wine.appellationamerica.com/w...ne-Review.html

Thought this was good article on Oregon Wine.



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Old 06-11-2006, 10:31 AM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default Oregon Wine Article.


Richard Neidich wrote:
http://wine.appellationamerica.com/w...ne-Review.html

Thought this was good article on Oregon Wine.


I have a question as a very occassional drinker of wines from the US,
and even more infrequently of those from Oregon (Which is a pity, I
always felt).

My first introduction to Oregon Pinot Noir (from WV, do not remember
the producer) was a late-90's (97 or 98) bottle. I remember it as one
with red fruit, some earth/ spice, moderate structure and good acidity.


More recent experiences (2002-03 bottles, different producers but most
prominently Kings Estate) have been with PN that could have been
Idealtypen of Californian CS: forward fruit, some residual sugar, lots
of oak which leads to development of interesting tastes and aromas
(mint, cedar) in due course.

I do know that memories lie, vintages vary and producers have their own
styles; but I wonder if there has been a movement to the current style
as alluded to in this article ("how will we ... meet the market's
desire") over the past decade in Oregon PN. Any comments would be
appreciated!

Cheers

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Old 06-11-2006, 09:01 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default Oregon Wine Article.

TB wrote:

More recent experiences (2002-03 bottles, different producers but most
prominently Kings Estate) have been with PN that could have been
Idealtypen of Californian CS: forward fruit, some residual sugar, lots
of oak which leads to development of interesting tastes and aromas
(mint, cedar) in due course.

I do know that memories lie, vintages vary and producers have their own
styles; but I wonder if there has been a movement to the current style
as alluded to in this article ("how will we ... meet the market's
desire") over the past decade in Oregon PN. Any comments would be
appreciated!


I think it's probably due to Parkerization...

Dana
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Old 06-11-2006, 09:26 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default Oregon Wine Article.

Dana H. Myers wrote:

I do know that memories lie, vintages vary and producers have their own
styles; but I wonder if there has been a movement to the current style
as alluded to in this article ("how will we ... meet the market's
desire") over the past decade in Oregon PN. Any comments would be
appreciated!


I think it's probably due to Parkerization...


And global warming.

Mark Lipton
(posting from the West Coast of the 22nd Century)
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Old 06-11-2006, 09:42 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default Oregon Wine Article.

(posting from the West Coast of the 22nd Century)

The top of Mt. Shasta?

Jose
--
"Never trust anything that can think for itself, if you can't see where
it keeps its brain." (chapter 10 of book 3 - Harry Potter).
for Email, make the obvious change in the address.


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Old 07-11-2006, 10:20 AM posted to alt.food.wine
TB TB is offline
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Default Oregon Wine Article.


Mark Lipton wrote:
Dana H. Myers wrote:

I do know that memories lie, vintages vary and producers have their own
styles; but I wonder if there has been a movement to the current style
as alluded to in this article ("how will we ... meet the market's
desire") over the past decade in Oregon PN. Any comments would be
appreciated!


I think it's probably due to Parkerization...


And global warming.

Mark Lipton
(posting from the West Coast of the 22nd Century)


So do I understand that the "typical" style is shifting in Oregon, even
in WV?

If it is, how much of it is warming and how much of it is consumer
tastes, I wonder?

A similar assertion is typically made to explain the growth of red wine
production in Germany. I remember chatting with a Hochheim am Main
winegrower who had started making some Spaetburgunder in the 90's. He
said that while a warmer climate made making passable red wines
possible/ easier in Rheingau (and his 2003 was really not bad at all),
but the reason why red wines were being made was consumer demand. And
this did make sense to me.

Cheers

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Old 07-11-2006, 05:59 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default Oregon Wine Article.

Mark Lipton wrote:
Dana H. Myers wrote:

I do know that memories lie, vintages vary and producers have their own
styles; but I wonder if there has been a movement to the current style
as alluded to in this article ("how will we ... meet the market's
desire") over the past decade in Oregon PN. Any comments would be
appreciated!

I think it's probably due to Parkerization...


And global warming.


Warmer weather at northern latitudes, sure, global warming
isn't making the vintners use more new oak and pick later...
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Old 07-11-2006, 06:25 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default Oregon Wine Article.

Dana H. Myers wrote:

Warmer weather at northern latitudes, sure, global warming
isn't making the vintners use more new oak and pick later...


No, of course not, Dana. My semi-tongue-in-cheek comment does have a
grain of truth to it, though. Temperatures in Oregon in this century
have generally been above the average seen in the previous century.
This has afforded riper grapes, which the winemakers have had to cope
with. It's how they cope with them that is a big variable. Other
stylistic changes such as you note are a big factor as well, certainly.

Mark Lipton


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