Vegetarian cooking (rec.food.veg.cooking) Discussion of matters related to the procurement, preparation, cooking, nutritional value and eating of vegetarian foods.

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Old 07-01-2006, 11:47 AM posted to rec.food.veg.cooking
Christopher Richards
 
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Default Textured Soy Protein How to Prepare?

I live in Oakland California. I have been going to a great Vietnamese
restaurant that has all kinds of textured protien. They make an excellent
beef dish out of this stuff. I walked down to Chinatown and purchased
Chicken Chunk and Vegetarian Beef Tendon (that's what the packet says) made
with non gentically modified soy. Ingredients:
Isolated soy protein, soy bean fiber, unhydrogenated soy bean oil, all
nauran [sic] vegetarian seasoning. I called the Lung Wei Chi Agriculture Co
as their phone is on the packet, but no one speaks English.

I want to know how best to prepare it. It may be a matter of only steaming
it and putting it in a sauce (or microwaving). In the shop they had dried,
refrigerated vaccum sealed (which is what I bought), and frozen.

Can anyone help me find out more information on how to prepare? I could use
some advice on making Vietnamese sauces too.
Thanks
Christopher

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Old 08-01-2006, 01:12 AM posted to rec.food.veg.cooking
axlq
 
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Default Textured Soy Protein How to Prepare?

In article ,
Christopher Richards wrote:
I live in Oakland California. I have been going to a great Vietnamese
restaurant that has all kinds of textured protien. They make an excellent


Careful -- textured protein products ALWAYS contain MSG as a
consequence of manufacture. This MSG is probably why you like the
flavor so much; MSG makes things taste better but I sure don't want
it in my body.

See http://www.truthinlabeling.org/hiddensources.html

I'd especially be suspicious if you get it from any Asian food
store. And if you ask them, they usually don't know what MSG is,
but call it by something else in their language. I have found this
particularly the case for Korean and Vietnamese places. Chinese
store and restaurant owners typically know the term "MSG" and what
it means.

-A
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Old 10-01-2006, 06:45 PM posted to rec.food.veg.cooking
Christopher Richards
 
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Default Textured Soy Protein How to Prepare?


"axlq" wrote in message
...
In article ,
Christopher Richards wrote:
I live in Oakland California. I have been going to a great Vietnamese
restaurant that has all kinds of textured protien. They make an excellent


Careful -- textured protein products ALWAYS contain MSG as a
consequence of manufacture. This MSG is probably why you like the
flavor so much; MSG makes things taste better but I sure don't want
it in my body.

See http://www.truthinlabeling.org/hiddensources.html

I'd especially be suspicious if you get it from any Asian food
store. And if you ask them, they usually don't know what MSG is,
but call it by something else in their language. I have found this
particularly the case for Korean and Vietnamese places. Chinese
store and restaurant owners typically know the term "MSG" and what
it means.

-A

Thanks. I live on Asian food, it's one of the reasons I live here. But I
shall check the MSG. I think the package had ingredients on it in English.
It does say that it is non-genetically modified. I'll be going back in a few
days and will check. I have since figured out how to prepare it. I stir
fried some eggplant and bock choy, and some onion and put it in some
Brahim's sauces. I like their Kuah Pajeri and Kuah Masak Lemak, wasn't so
fond of the Kuah Sambal Tumis which is more for seafood. Having this with
some jasmine rice has been a real treat.
CR
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Old 14-01-2006, 09:58 AM posted to rec.food.veg.cooking
axlq
 
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Default Textured Soy Protein How to Prepare?

In article ,
Christopher Richards wrote:
[moderator snipped quoting - gedge]
Thanks. I live on Asian food, it's one of the reasons I live here. But I
shall check the MSG. I think the package had ingredients on it in English.


Please look at the link I posted again. The point is, with "textured
protein" you WON'T see MSG in the ingredients, even though it's certain
to be in the product.

-A
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Old 16-01-2006, 03:21 AM posted to rec.food.veg.cooking
Kake L Pugh
 
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Default Textured Soy Protein How to Prepare?

axlq wrote:
MSG makes things taste better but I sure don't want it in my body.


For the sake of balance, here is the other side of the story, presented
by the Observer Food Monthly:

http://observer.guardian.co.uk/foodm...522368,00.html

Kake


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Old 09-02-2006, 12:31 AM posted to rec.food.veg.cooking
Jen Jen is offline
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Default Textured Soy Protein How to Prepare?

Would you mind posting the restaurant you eat at in Oakland? I live
here too..always searching for good veg. food!
TY
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Old 09-02-2006, 03:02 PM posted to rec.food.veg.cooking
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Default OT: Restaurants in Oakland (was Textured Soy Protein How to Prepare?

On Thu, 9 Feb 2006 00:31:35 GMT, "Jen" wrote:

Would you mind posting the restaurant you eat at in Oakland? I live
here too..always searching for good veg. food!
TY


My best recommendations (I live in North Oakland, but I'm relatively
new here, so I'm sure it's a VERY limited list) follow. I included
the places nearby that are in Berkeley, especially since my favorite
veggie place is there.

Long Life Vegi House, central Berkeley (vegetarian and seafood) --
they make wonderful gluten- and soy-based "meat" dishes. My partner
didn't believe the sweet-and-sour "pork" wasn't really meat.

Addis (Ethiopian/Eritrean), north Oakland (62nd & Telegraph) -- their
veggie combo is delicious and plentiful

Lanesplitter pizza, 48th or so & Telegraph -- they have a vegan "notta
ricotta" that they use to make their pizzas and calzones vegan if you
want

Anzu sushi, central Berkeley (Haste or so and Shattuck). Their
avocado roll is very good and very inexpensive. Two dollars and
change. Perfect snack while walking around and window shopping.

Temescal Cafe, 49th & Telegraph -- they always have their lovely vegan
chili, and lots of good vegetarian/vegan entrees, along with their
wonderful salad that I could eat every single day. The staff treats
us so well that we feel like we belong there.

Asmara, 49th & Telegraph -- another good Ethiopian place whose veggie
combo is delicious

Gypsy Trattoria, Durant Ave in Berkeley. They make the pasta sauces
to order, and the gnocchi is wonderful, as is the penne gorgonzola.
It's noisy and full of college students, and the service is quick and
no-nonsense.

Smart Alec's, Durant & Telegraph, Berkeley. A bowl of one of their
five vegan soups (corn chowder, lentil, vegetable, potato-leek, and
something else I can't remember) and a HUGE chunk of cornbread is
$2.99. So good. Also, they have a decent veggie burger and a bunch
of really good salads. You can get wheatberries and edamame on your
salad, too. Their fries are low-fat, and the place is another loud,
college-kid-filled one. (I work at Cal.)

Nomad Cafe, 65th & Shattuck, North Oakland. Their Toasted Roasted
sandwich is the most decadent grilled cheese you ever had in your life
-- havarti and roasted red peppers, yum. And I love their baba
ganouj. I run a spoken-word thing there on Thursday nights, and the
staff is amazingly cool.

Genova ravioli factory/deli, 51st & Telegraph, in the Walgreens
center. If there's anything better than their cheese ravioli tossed
with their marinated tomatoes and a few pine nuts, and served with a
side of their brie-and-roquefort cheese (I forget its real name, but I
think it starts with a c), then I don't know what it is.

I'll probably think of more later.

Serene
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Old 06-03-2006, 01:10 PM posted to rec.food.veg.cooking
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Default Textured Soy Protein How to Prepare?

Jen wrote:
Would you mind posting the restaurant you eat at in Oakland? I live
here too..always searching for good veg. food!


You might also want to ask in news:ba.food.
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Old 06-08-2006, 01:47 PM posted to rec.food.veg.cooking
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Default Textured Soy Protein How to Prepare?

Christopher Richards wrote [and the moderator edited quoting - gedge]:
down to Chinatown and purchased
Chicken Chunk and Vegetarian Beef Tendon (that's what the packet says) made
with non gentically modified soy. Ingredients:
Isolated soy protein, soy bean fiber, unhydrogenated soy bean oil, all
nauran [sic] vegetarian seasoning. I called the Lung Wei Chi Agriculture Co
as their phone is on the packet, but no one speaks English.

I want to know how best to prepare it. It may be a matter of only steaming
it and putting it in a sauce (or microwaving). In the shop they had dried,
refrigerated vaccum sealed (which is what I bought), and frozen.

Can anyone help me find out more information on how to prepare? I could use
some advice on making Vietnamese sauces too.


I prepare my tvp (and also baked and/or fried tofu) by soaking it in
broth (either vegetable broth or Miso or both). I always add a few
tablespoons of red pepper sauce or catchup, some vegetarian
Worcestershire sauce and Soy sauce. I'll usually add salt and pepper.
Boil the mixture then add TVP (and baked/fried tofu) let it sit for a
few hours (or a long time in the refrigerator). I usually bake the
soaked tvp at low temperature for a few hours and then freeze what I
don't eat. Its great warmed up or added to Barbecue sauce for a
sandwich. I find many that oriental grocery stors have various forms
of TVP which is usually much cheapr that that available at Whole Foods
or Wild Oats. I almost always have to buy the fine grunual TVP from
Whole foods type stores or off the web. In Austin the COOP has an
awsome collection of large and small pieces of TVP.
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Old 06-08-2006, 07:51 PM posted to rec.food.veg.cooking
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Default Textured Soy Protein How to Prepare?

According to :
Boil the mixture then add TVP (and baked/fried tofu) let it sit for a
few hours (or a long time in the refrigerator).


I don't know about tofu, but when I soak TVP I only do it for 10-15 mins.
Usually with a vegtables stock cube.
--


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Old 08-08-2006, 05:02 PM posted to rec.food.veg.cooking
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Default Textured Soy Protein How to Prepare?

Hi,
I live in the Bay Area and shop a lot in Oakland and San Francisco
Chinatowns. I've had a lot of these "phoney meat" things and it's much
easier than preparing TVP. Just steam the stuff or saute it it with a
bit of water. It's not a big deal. You can also use waterted down
Hoisin sauce.
Enjoy!
Shen

lauren wrote:
Christopher Richards wrote [and the moderator edited quoting - gedge]:
down to Chinatown and purchased Chicken Chunk and Vegetarian Beef Tendon
=== Mod Snip ===
I want to know how best to prepare it.



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