Vegetarian cooking (rec.food.veg.cooking) Discussion of matters related to the procurement, preparation, cooking, nutritional value and eating of vegetarian foods.

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Old 11-11-2005, 06:14 PM posted to rec.food.veg.cooking
Steve
 
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Default Edamme & regular soy beans

Hi;

I had edamme for the first time several weeks ago.

It was green, shaped like and tasted like fresh baby lima beans.

I found this to be interesting as all of the dried soybeans I have seen
are small, beige pellets. Once soaked they remain beige( I've had black
ones from a can )and are not similar to edamme.

Is edamme a differnt variety of soy bean then what is sold dried?

Steve

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Old 15-11-2005, 02:31 AM posted to rec.food.veg.cooking
Melinda Meahan - take out TRASH to send
 
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Default Edamme & regular soy beans

Steve wrote:

Is edamme a differnt variety of soy bean then what is sold dried?



I believe they are the immature form, just like green beans are an
immature bean, and the beige-colored ones you see are the mature bean,
like you would buy kidney beans, garbanzo beans, or whatever.
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Old 15-11-2005, 10:03 PM posted to rec.food.veg.cooking
Viviane
 
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Default Edamme & regular soy beans

Steve wrote:
Hi;

I had edamme for the first time several weeks ago.

It was green, shaped like and tasted like fresh baby lima beans.

I found this to be interesting as all of the dried soybeans I have seen
are small, beige pellets. Once soaked they remain beige( I've had black
ones from a can )and are not similar to edamme.

Is edamme a differnt variety of soy bean then what is sold dried?

Steve


Hi,

It's actually called "edamame". A Google search will give you almost
600 000 hits!

Viviane
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Old 15-11-2005, 10:05 PM posted to rec.food.veg.cooking
Vicky Conlan
 
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Default Edamme & regular soy beans

According to :
I found this to be interesting as all of the dried soybeans I have seen
are small, beige pellets. Once soaked they remain beige( I've had black
ones from a can )and are not similar to edamme.

Is edamme a differnt variety of soy bean then what is sold dried?


I was at the veggie show thing at Wembley this weekend (which, incidentally,
was awful - too many people, too many queues! There looked like there were
some good samples on offer, but you couldn't get near them without waiting
for half an hour) and someone had an edamame stall, and from the blurb on
and around it, they seem to be the less developed bean than what you are
probably used to.

In fact, from edamame.com:

what's edamame?

Edamame is a green vegetable more commonly known as a soybean,
harvested at the peak of ripening right before it reaches the
"hardening" time. The word Edamame means "Beans on Branches," and it
grows in clusters on bushy branches. To retain the freshness and its
natural flavor, it is parboiled and quick-frozen. In East Asia, the
soybean has been used for over two thousand years as a major source of
protein. Edamame is consumed as a snack, a vegetable dish, used in
soups or processed into sweets. As a snack, the pods are lightly
boiled in salted water, and then the seeds are squeezed directly from
the pods into the mouth with the fingers.

--
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Old 16-11-2005, 09:08 AM posted to rec.food.veg.cooking
EastneyEnder
 
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Default Edamme & regular soy beans

Vicky Conlan wrote:
.....Edamame is consumed as a snack, a vegetable dish, used in
soups or processed into sweets. As a snack, the pods are lightly
boiled in salted water, and then the seeds are squeezed directly from
the pods into the mouth with the fingers.


They are delicious.

They don't seem to have caught on over here yet, but I had them 4 years ago
as a starter in a Japanese restaurant in New Orleans. I recently saw some
frozen ones for sale in my local Chinese supermarket and I am sorely tempted
to try them!

Sue
Portsmouth, UK
--
pen-drake location ntl-world-.-com minus hyphens.


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Old 16-11-2005, 12:01 PM posted to rec.food.veg.cooking
Vicky Conlan
 
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Default Edamme & regular soy beans

According to :
They don't seem to have caught on over here yet, but I had them 4 years ago
as a starter in a Japanese restaurant in New Orleans. I recently saw some
frozen ones for sale in my local Chinese supermarket and I am sorely tempted
to try them!


If you have a local wagamamas restaurant (or visit somewhere with one)
they have them as a side dish. (in the unshelled, salted style, rather
than the frozen ones which appear to be pre-popped, ime)

--
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Old 17-11-2005, 03:12 PM posted to rec.food.veg.cooking
EastneyEnder
 
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Default Edamme & regular soy beans

Vicky Conlan wrote:

If you have a local wagamamas restaurant (or visit somewhere with one)
they have them as a side dish. (in the unshelled, salted style, rather
than the frozen ones which appear to be pre-popped, ime)


I don't think we do have a Wagamama anywhere near here, but the frozen ones
I saw were still in their shells, so all I need now are instructions on how
to prepare them!

Sue
Portsmouth, UK
--
pen-drake location ntl-world-.-com minus hyphens.
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Old 19-11-2005, 01:53 PM posted to rec.food.veg.cooking
Jude
 
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Default Edamme & regular soy beans

All I do is put them in a bowl, pods and all, with a few tablespoons of
water. I micriwave them for 2 minutes to thaw and warm them, then
sprinkle to pods with coarse kosher salt. We suck the pods and pop the
beans out as we're eating them. Couldn't be easier!
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Old 20-11-2005, 11:22 AM posted to rec.food.veg.cooking
Vicky Conlan
 
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Default Edamme & regular soy beans

According to :
All I do is put them in a bowl, pods and all, with a few tablespoons of
water. I micriwave them for 2 minutes to thaw and warm them, then
sprinkle to pods with coarse kosher salt. We suck the pods and pop the
beans out as we're eating them. Couldn't be easier!


Actually, I have a bit of a dim question - what's the point of the salt
when you are only eating the inside?

--
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Old 28-11-2005, 11:45 AM posted to rec.food.veg.cooking
Jude
 
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Default Edamme & regular soy beans

Vicky Conlan wrote:
According to :
All I do is put them in a bowl, pods and all, with a few tablespoons of
water. I micriwave them for 2 minutes to thaw and warm them, then
sprinkle to pods with coarse kosher salt. We suck the pods and pop the
beans out as we're eating them. Couldn't be easier!


Actually, I have a bit of a dim question - what's the point of the salt
when you are only eating the inside?

--
Caption Competition: http://sig.comps.org/caption/


well, i like to put the whoe pods in my mouth and use my teeth to
extract the beans. so the salt makes them taste salty when i put the
pods in my mouth. I suppose I could shell the beans by hand and then
salt the beans, but that's more work.

The salt definitely perks up the flavor. They're quite mild.


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