Vegetarian cooking (rec.food.veg.cooking) Discussion of matters related to the procurement, preparation, cooking, nutritional value and eating of vegetarian foods.

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Old 21-11-2006, 05:47 PM posted to rec.food.veg.cooking
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Default Miso baked tofu - and aubergine thing

I originally saw this recipe on livejournal:
http://community.livejournal.com/veg...tml?style=mine

but the original seems to be from About.com:
http://vegetarian.about.com/od/maind...r/misotofu.htm

I changed it about a bit, but basically stuck to the original idea.
It's really rather tasty; I even tested it on a tofu-hater and he
didn't hate it. Use a brand of tofu with a good texture - I used
Clean Bean tofu, which is a fresh, unpasteurised tofu available here
in London (not sure about outside London, sorry).

Miso-sesame marinade:
100g (5 Tbsp, 1/3 cup) miso
3 Tbsp sugar
1 tsp ginger puree or equivalent fresh, chopped
2-3 garlic cloves, chopped
3 Tbsp rice vinegar
2 Tbsp soya milk
3 Tbsp water
2 Tbsp soy sauce
2 Tbsp toasted sesame oil
dash of cayenne pepper, or 1/2 tsp hot bean paste, or similar (optional)

Put all the marinade ingredients into a blender and whizz to a thin
puree.

Miso baked tofu:
Cut tofu into 1cm (1/2 inch) thick pieces, and marinade them in the
miso mixture for at least 10 minutes. To cook them, lay them on an
oiled baking tray and bake them at 200-230C (400-450F) for about 15-20
minutes, until done to taste. You can turn them over halfway through
and drizzle on a bit more miso mixture, if you like. If you like the
flavour of the uncooked marinade, drizzle a bit over before serving to
add a bit of extra zing from the fresh ginger and garlic.

Aubergine (eggplant) with miso-sesame sauce:
This is what you do with the leftover marinade from the tofu dish.
(The marinade will keep in the fridge for a few days at least.) Cut
an aubergine into bite-sized cubes, and marinade it in the miso
marinade for at least 10 minutes. Remove with a slotted spoon, and
sautee over high heat in a frying pan greased with sunflower oil,
until softened to your liking. Pour over the marinade, and cook,
stirring, for a little longer until the sauce has reduced and coated
the aubergine. Serve with rice.


All very tasty! And one of the best ways to cook aubergine, since
marinading it in something salty also makes it soak up less oil.

Kake

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Old 21-11-2006, 11:49 PM posted to rec.food.veg.cooking
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Default Miso baked tofu - and aubergine thing

On 2006-11-21, Kake L Pugh wrote:
Aubergine (eggplant) with miso-sesame sauce:


Have you had nasu dengaku? It's slices of fried (or maybe roasted?)
eggplant slathered with a sweet miso sauce (miso, mirin, and some
other stuff). Rather addictive. I'll post a recipe from "The Book of
Miso" when I get home.

N.
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Old 22-11-2006, 08:37 PM posted to rec.food.veg.cooking
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Default Miso baked tofu - and aubergine thing

On 2006-11-21, Natarajan Krishnaswami wrote:
nasu dengaku


The miso preparation used for this dish is called nerimiso, or sweet
simmered miso, of which there are many variations: red, white (my
favorite), or hatcho miso; honey or sugar sweetened, and mirin (my
favorite) or water; some have sauteed nut meats (esp walnut; with red
or barley miso); some have yuzu or other citrus zest (with red or
barley miso). A famous white sweet simmered miso used for tofu
dengaku also has egg yolks.

The basic technique is to use around a 2:1 ratio of miso to liquid,
heat to a boil, reduce to low heat and simmer till it starts to
thicken, stirring constantly.

Adapted from Shurtleff & Aoyagi's "Book of Miso":

"Dengaku, one of Japan's oldest and most famous types of miso
cuisine, is prepared by charcoal broiling skewered, bite-sized
pieces of various foods. Each piece is then coated on one or both
sides with a thing layer of miso and the skewers are rebroiled
briefly until the miso is speckled and fragrant."

1/4 to 1/2 cup nerimiso (I like sweet white)
12-24 oz small Japanese eggplants
sesame oil
roasted sesame seeds

Prepare the nerimiso in advance and allow to cool.

Cut the eggplants into 1/2 in thick rounds (or big eggplants into
bite sized wedges). Soak for a few minutes in lightly salted water,
drain well, and pat dry. Pierce both sides in several places with a
fork or chop stick, then brush with sesame oil.

Skewer with two round skewers (so that when they are both held, the
piece won't move). Holding a few pieces of skewered eggplant at a
time, side by side, over a gas burner, broil for about 30 seconds
until the eggplant is lightly speckled. (Or broil eggplant on one
side over a charcoal brazier or barbecue.) Coat the broiled side
with a 1/8 inch thick layer of nerimiso, then broil the uncoated
side till speckled. Flip again, and broil the miso topping until it
is also speckled. Garnish the topped side with sesame seeds.

(Alternatively, you can broil the pieces in an oven without
skewering.)

However, I think what I had in mind is actually nasu no shigiyaki
(grilled eggplant shigiyaki):

4 Japanese eggplants, sliced lengthwise into halves
1 Tbsp sesame oil
2 1/2 Tbsp nerimiso
sansho or sesame seeds

Score the eggplant halves in a criss-cross pattern, brush the scored
face with oil, and broil on both sides till nicely speckled.
(Alternatively, deep fry the slices.) Spread each cut surface with
nerimiso and rebroil quickly until the miso is fragrant and
speckled. Sprinkle sesame seeds or ground sansho over the miso.

or nasu no nabe shigiyaki (fried eggplant shigiyaki):

4 Japanese eggplants
2 Tbsp red, barley or hatcho miso
1 Tbsp honey
1 1/2 tsp sake, white wine or mirin
1/4 tsp gingerroot, grated
1 Tbps water
3-4 Tbsp oil
1-2 tsp roasted sesame seeds

Peel strips of skin lengthwise from the eggplants such that they
have alternating peeled and purple stripes. Soak the eggplants in
water for 10 minutes.

Combine the miso, honey, sake, and water, and simmer for 3-4 minutes
till smooth and slightly thickened. Remove from heat.

Pat the eggplants dry, and cut into halves lengthwise. Pan-fry for
2 minutes, covered, until golden brown. Turn and fry the other
side. Arranges the slices on a serving plate, spread with the miso
sauce, and sprinkle with sesame seeds. Serve chilled.

I had some of this at a Japanese restaurant last night. Mmm!


(These are all closely related dishes.)

Enjoy!
N.
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Old 24-11-2006, 11:07 PM posted to rec.food.veg.cooking
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Default Miso baked tofu - and aubergine thing

Natarajan Krishnaswami wrote:
The miso preparation used for this dish is called nerimiso, or sweet
simmered miso, of which there are many variations: [...]


Ooh, thank you for such a detailed post! That must have taken ages to
type out. I've grilled things with miso on before, but I didn't know
about nerimiso. I've got an aubergine, and two kinds of miso, in the
fridge at the moment, so I'll have a play about once this weekend's
dinner party is safely over, and report back.

Kake
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Old 08-12-2006, 09:25 AM posted to rec.food.veg.cooking
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Default Miso baked tofu - and aubergine thing

Natarajan Krishnaswami wrote:
nasu dengaku


I finally managed to earmark an aubergine to try out some of your suggestions
(the problem is they're so _useful_, I kept putting them in other things).

I used this preparation:
Score the eggplant halves in a criss-cross pattern, brush the scored face
with oil, and broil on both sides till nicely speckled. (Alternatively,
deep fry the slices.) Spread each cut surface with nerimiso and rebroil
quickly until the miso is fragrant and speckled.


I used large eggplants and the skin went a bit tough. I think I'll try the
peeling-them-in-strips thing next time.

and this nerimiso recipe:
2 Tbsp red, barley or hatcho miso
1 Tbsp honey
1 1/2 tsp sake, white wine or mirin
1/4 tsp gingerroot, grated
1 Tbps water
3-4 Tbsp oil
1-2 tsp roasted sesame seeds
[...]
Combine the miso, honey, sake, and water, and simmer for 3-4 minutes
till smooth and slightly thickened. Remove from heat.


It was a bit too sweet for me, but then I did use mirin, not having either
sake or white wine on hand. I'll have to get hold of some sake and try it
again.

One thing I hadn't entirely been expecting was how well the nerimiso retained
heat, so I burned my tongue slightly

All very very tasty though; thank you.

Kake


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