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Old 07-10-2005, 02:05 PM
Beach Runner
 
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Default The Real reason processed meats cause pancreatic cancer

The real reason why processed meats are so dangerous to your health
by the Health Ranger (Mike Adams)
Aug 21, 2005

http://www.newstarget.com/011148.html

Have you ever wondered why the consumption of processed meats is so
strongly linked to cancers of the colon, breast, prostate and
pancreas? The evidence continues to mount, as demonstrated by a
recent study showing a 67% increase in pancreatic cancer for people
consuming moderate amounts of processed meat on a frequent basis.
(Pulse; 4/23/2005, Vol. 65 Issue 16, p10).

Conventional medical doctors and nutrition (see related ebook on
nutrition) researchers tend to put the bulk of the blame on the
saturated fat content of processed meats, but that ignores two
notable culprits that I think are far worse offenders when it comes
to human health. Let's take a closer look at these two problems with
processed meats.

The first problem is found in the fats of these processed meats. The
problem isn't the fat molecules themselves, but rather the toxic
chemicals, heavy metals and environmental pollutants that are found
inside those fat molecules.

You see, fat tissues -- whether in a cow or a human -- tend to
concentrate whatever pollutants are found in the mainstay diet of the
animal. A cow eats literally tons of grass in its lifetime, and in
doing so, it collects and concentrates low-level pollutants found in
its diet. For non-organic beef, it's quite common to find trace
amounts of heavy metals (mercury, cadmium), pesticides, and even
PCBs. That's because, for non-organic beef, feed practices are rather
horrifying. You'd be shocked to learn what's perfectly legal to feed
to cows intended for human consumption.

So while conventional doctors tend to put the health risk blame on
the saturated fat found in meat products, I think it has a lot more
to do with the toxic substances concentrated in those fat tissues. A
cow is much like a land bottom-feeder, and eating meat from a
non-organic cow is a lot like eating shrimp from the bottom of the
ocean.

These toxins, when consumed, are clearly and unquestionably linked to
cancers as well as nervous system disorders that can accelerate
Alzheimer's disease and dementia. They also stress the liver and
impair immune system function. The human body should never be exposed
to mercury, PCBs or the rocket fuel chemicals that are now almost
universally found in cows' milk products across the country (in a
2005 Texas Tech University study, perchlorate was detected in 46 of
47 store-bought samples of cows' milk across 11 states).

- - - - -

http://www.newstarget.com/011148-02.html

The second (and more important) reason processed meats are so
strongly correlated with cancer is, I believe, the continued use of a
cancer-promoting additive called sodium nitrite.

This ingredient, which sounds harmless, is actually highly
carcinogenic once it enters the human digestive system. There, it
forms a variety of nitrosamine compounds that enter the bloodstream
and wreak havoc with a number of internal organs: the liver and
pancreas in particular. Sodium nitrite is widely regarded as a toxic
ingredient, and the USDA actually tried to ban this additive in the
1970's but was vetoed by food manufacturers who complained they had
no alternative for preserving packaged meat products.

You can find sodium nitrite in nearly every packaged meat product
imaginable. It's listed right on the label of products like bacon,
breakfast sausage, beef jerky, pepperoni, sandwich meat, ham, hot
dogs, and even the meats found in canned soups. If you and I walked
into any grocery store in America, I could show you hundreds of
products that contain this ingredient right now. And I believe this
sodium nitrite is the primary cause of pancreatic cancer in humans
who consume even moderate quantities of processed meats.

If sodium nitrite is so dangerous, why does the food industry use it?
Simple: this chemical just happens to turn meats bright red. It's
actually a color fixer, and it makes old, dead meats appear fresh and
vibrant. Thus, food manufacturers insist on using sodium nitrite for
the simple reason that it sells more meat products. Consumers are
strongly influenced by the color of grocery products (which is why
Florida oranges are often dipped in red dye, by the way), and when
meat products look fresh, people will buy them, even if the true
color of the months-old meat is putrid gray.

There is a way to minimize the damage from sodium nitrite, by the
way. You won't hear this from the USDA these days, since the
department doesn't really want to discuss sodium nitrite at all.
Since the 1970's, the USDA has shifted into protection mode of the
very industries it was supposed to regulate... to the point where it
now acts as more of a marketing branch of the beef, milk and grain
industries.

The proven protection strategy is to consume fairly large doses of
vitamins C and E before dietary exposure to sodium nitrite. This
nutritional protection strategy inhibits the conversion of sodium
nitrite to cancer-causing nitrosamines. Personally, I would never
consume any processed meat products, but if you choose to do so, you
can reduce your risk of cancer from sodium nitrite by consuming these
antioxidants before your meal.

- - - - -

http://www.newstarget.com/011148-03.html

Consuming chlorella before or during meals with meat will also
theoretically protect you from various environmental pollutants.
Chlorella is well known to bind to heavy metals in particular,
shepherding them out of your body before they can do much damage.
Personally, I take chlorella any time I eat seafood for this very
purpose.

You can also, of course, turn to fresh, organic, free-range meat.
That's the safest approach for any meat consumer. Yes, it's
expensive, but last time I checked, treating pancreatic cancer was a
bit on the pricey side, too.

There are other problems with processed meats, nutritionally
speaking. Meat has zero fiber, for one thing. But in terms of the
major causative factors of disease in the human body, I believe the
two primary culprits are the heavy metals and toxins concentrated in
the fat tissues of cows, combined with the sodium nitrite additives
used by meat processing companies to preserve their products and give
them enhanced visual appeal.

And thus, the saturated fat argument is a distraction from the real
causes of cancer that the U.S. beef industry doesn't want to talk
about. It's not the saturated fat that causes pancreatic cancer. For
example, coconut oil consumption wouldn't cause a person's risk of
pancreatic cancer to leap 67%, although it's still saturated fat. The
real cause of the cancer, I believe, is what's found INSIDE the fat,
and what's ADDED to the meat during processing and packaging.

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