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Old 07-08-2005, 01:10 PM
Beach Runner
 
Posts: n/a
Default USDA calls Rabbits, chickens

This is relationship to the comments that heating oil changes them.


What’s a Trans Fat Anyway?
By Leanne Ely, C.N.C.

The FDA will make another change to food labels by 2006 including
information on trans fats so the consumer can distinguish if this is
indeed something he’d want to buy, based on the nutrition offered (or

not offered) and/or the potential risk involved in consuming that
particular food.

So what’s a trans fat, anyway? Trans fatty acids are created through
a
process called hydrogenation, which basically forces hydrogen into a
highly heated oil creating a hard product from a liquid product--more
commonly known as shortening or margarine.

The problem with trans fats is they are just as culpable as saturated

fats for raising LDL levels (low density lipoprotein, the “bad
cholesterol”).
But unlike saturated fats (which also raise HDL levels) trans fats
actually reduce HDL levels (high density lipoprotein, the “good
cholesterol”). So you can see where the margarine/butter debate would
logically end.

Though trans fats have only been seriously studied for the past 10
years, there are some early indications that trans fats could
increase your risk to cancer, diabetes and may even cause pregnancy
complications.

So what will the FDA say is an acceptable amount of trans fat in the
diet?
In my estimation, it doesn’t matter. Any product that contains
hydrogenated oils, shortening or margarine should be avoided. Some of

the biggest trans fat offenders are donuts, crackers, cookies and
French fries. You can probably add to that list—just start reading
labels.

In this day and age, there is no reason to not be reading nutrition
labels. Stay away from hydrogenated anything (and partially
hydrogenated oils, as well) and give your body the healthy foods you need.


  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 07-08-2005, 06:41 PM
usual suspect
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Beach Runner wrote:
This is relationship to the comments that heating oil changes them.


What’s a Trans Fat Anyway?


Heating vegetable oil will not change it into transfat, dumb ass.
Hydrogenation occurs in a pressurized environment in which the oil is
heated above 500-degrees Fahrenheit in the presence of metal catalysts
(e.g., nickel, zinc, copper) and hydrogen gas. Such is *VERY UNLIKELY*
to occur in one's kitchen.

The subject heading also has nothing whatsoever to do with the article
provided below.

By Leanne Ely, C.N.C.

The FDA will make another change to food labels by 2006 including
information on trans fats so the consumer can distinguish if this is
indeed something he’d want to buy, based on the nutrition offered (or
not offered) and/or the potential risk involved in consuming that
particular food.

So what’s a trans fat, anyway? Trans fatty acids are created through
a
process called hydrogenation, which basically forces hydrogen into a
highly heated oil creating a hard product from a liquid product--more
commonly known as shortening or margarine.


Hydrogenation occurs in a pressurized environment in which the oil is
heated above 500-degrees Fahrenheit in the presence of metal catalysts
(e.g., nickel, zinc, copper) and hydrogen gas. Such is *VERY UNLIKELY*
to occur in one's kitchen.

The problem with trans fats is they are just as culpable as saturated
fats


If not more so, because saturated fats don't suppress HDL like transfats
do. HDL helps carry excess LDL from the bloodstream. More HDL is a good
thing; monounsaturated and saturated fats both increase HDL. Less HDL is
a bad thing; transfats decrease HDL. More LDL is a bad thing; saturated
and transfats increase LDL. Less LDL is a good thing; reducing saturated
fats and transfats in the diet should reduce serum LDL levels.

for raising LDL levels (low density lipoprotein, the “bad
cholesterol”).
But unlike saturated fats (which also raise HDL levels) trans fats
actually reduce HDL levels (high density lipoprotein, the “good
cholesterol”).


Exactly, and these different types of fats play a larger role in serum
cholesterol than does dietary cholesterol. The oily fishes recommended
by cardiologists and nutritionists are fairly high in cholesterol; their
lipid profiles, though, are such that consuming them is beneficial in
elevating HDL and reducing LDL and creating a healthier ratio between
the two.

...
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Old 07-08-2005, 10:21 PM
Beach Runner
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I'm sorry if I implied ALL heating of oil causes transfat.
But it is the same FDA that allowed TRANSFAT in our food supply.

however, heating oil does change the characteristics. Hence the term
pure virgin unheated oil. Oil's characteristics change when heated.
Cold unprocessed oil is much healthier. Such as avocados.

I also apologize, it was the wrong buffer. This was supposed to be
about the FDA declaring Rabbits Chickens. I apologize for the wrong buffer.

usual suspect wrote:

Beach Runner wrote:

This is relationship to the comments that heating oil changes them.


What’s a Trans Fat Anyway?



Heating vegetable oil will not change it into transfat, dumb ass.
Hydrogenation occurs in a pressurized environment in which the oil is
heated above 500-degrees Fahrenheit in the presence of metal catalysts
(e.g., nickel, zinc, copper) and hydrogen gas. Such is *VERY UNLIKELY*
to occur in one's kitchen.

The subject heading also has nothing whatsoever to do with the article
provided below.

By Leanne Ely, C.N.C.

The FDA will make another change to food labels by 2006 including
information on trans fats so the consumer can distinguish if this is
indeed something he’d want to buy, based on the nutrition offered (or
not offered) and/or the potential risk involved in consuming that
particular food.

So what’s a trans fat, anyway? Trans fatty acids are created through
a
process called hydrogenation, which basically forces hydrogen into a
highly heated oil creating a hard product from a liquid product--more
commonly known as shortening or margarine.



Hydrogenation occurs in a pressurized environment in which the oil is
heated above 500-degrees Fahrenheit in the presence of metal catalysts
(e.g., nickel, zinc, copper) and hydrogen gas. Such is *VERY UNLIKELY*
to occur in one's kitchen.

The problem with trans fats is they are just as culpable as saturated
fats



If not more so, because saturated fats don't suppress HDL like transfats
do. HDL helps carry excess LDL from the bloodstream. More HDL is a good
thing; monounsaturated and saturated fats both increase HDL. Less HDL is
a bad thing; transfats decrease HDL. More LDL is a bad thing; saturated
and transfats increase LDL. Less LDL is a good thing; reducing saturated
fats and transfats in the diet should reduce serum LDL levels.

for raising LDL levels (low density lipoprotein, the “bad
cholesterol”).
But unlike saturated fats (which also raise HDL levels) trans fats
actually reduce HDL levels (high density lipoprotein, the “good
cholesterol”).



Exactly, and these different types of fats play a larger role in serum
cholesterol than does dietary cholesterol. The oily fishes recommended
by cardiologists and nutritionists are fairly high in cholesterol; their
lipid profiles, though, are such that consuming them is beneficial in
elevating HDL and reducing LDL and creating a healthier ratio between
the two.

...


Except fish have mercury.
  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 08-08-2005, 02:28 PM
usual suspect
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Beach Runner wrote:
I'm sorry


You should be.

if I implied ALL heating of oil causes transfat.


You did more than imply, nitwit.

But it is the same FDA that allowed TRANSFAT in our food supply.


Non sequitur. That has NOTHING to do with the issue you raised.

however, heating oil does change the characteristics. Hence the term
pure virgin unheated oil.


No oil is unheated, dumb ass. Pressing is done with great force which
generates heat. Often, seeds or olives or whatever's being pressed is
pre-heated to make oil extraction easier.

Oil's characteristics change when heated.


EVERYTHING changes when heated. Scroll down to "Extraction Methods" on
the following link.

http://www.mothernature.com/Library/...cfm/Id/1830008

Cold unprocessed oil is much healthier. Such as avocados.


"Cold" pressing is actually heated, either through pre-heating or
through the pressing itself. The difference in temperatures between
mechanical pressing and solvent extraction is ~100 degrees F -- which is
a relatively meaningless difference.

I also apologize, it was the wrong buffer. This was supposed to be
about the FDA declaring Rabbits Chickens. I apologize for the wrong
buffer.


Buffoon.

usual suspect wrote:

Beach Runner wrote:

This is relationship to the comments that heating oil changes them.


What’s a Trans Fat Anyway?




Heating vegetable oil will not change it into transfat, dumb ass.
Hydrogenation occurs in a pressurized environment in which the oil is
heated above 500-degrees Fahrenheit in the presence of metal catalysts
(e.g., nickel, zinc, copper) and hydrogen gas. Such is *VERY UNLIKELY*
to occur in one's kitchen.

The subject heading also has nothing whatsoever to do with the article
provided below.

By Leanne Ely, C.N.C.

The FDA will make another change to food labels by 2006 including
information on trans fats so the consumer can distinguish if this is
indeed something he’d want to buy, based on the nutrition offered (or
not offered) and/or the potential risk involved in consuming that
particular food.

So what’s a trans fat, anyway? Trans fatty acids are created through
a
process called hydrogenation, which basically forces hydrogen into a
highly heated oil creating a hard product from a liquid product--more
commonly known as shortening or margarine.




Hydrogenation occurs in a pressurized environment in which the oil is
heated above 500-degrees Fahrenheit in the presence of metal catalysts
(e.g., nickel, zinc, copper) and hydrogen gas. Such is *VERY UNLIKELY*
to occur in one's kitchen.

The problem with trans fats is they are just as culpable as saturated
fats




If not more so, because saturated fats don't suppress HDL like
transfats do. HDL helps carry excess LDL from the bloodstream. More
HDL is a good thing; monounsaturated and saturated fats both increase
HDL. Less HDL is a bad thing; transfats decrease HDL. More LDL is a
bad thing; saturated and transfats increase LDL. Less LDL is a good
thing; reducing saturated fats and transfats in the diet should reduce
serum LDL levels.

for raising LDL levels (low density lipoprotein, the “bad
cholesterol”).
But unlike saturated fats (which also raise HDL levels) trans fats
actually reduce HDL levels (high density lipoprotein, the “good
cholesterol”).




Exactly, and these different types of fats play a larger role in serum
cholesterol than does dietary cholesterol. The oily fishes recommended
by cardiologists and nutritionists are fairly high in cholesterol;
their lipid profiles, though, are such that consuming them is
beneficial in elevating HDL and reducing LDL and creating a healthier
ratio between the two.

...



Except fish have mercury.


Not all fish. Stop making generalizations. I know you can't help it
because you're mentally-defective (I'm not sure your medication is the
sole reason for it, either).

The Seychelles study refutes the notion that general methylmercury
exposure, even in "high" concentrations, causes developmental problems.
Seychelles children eat significantly more fish and have 10-20x higher
concentrations of methymercury than US children, yet have no greater
incidence of developmental problems. Their exposure to methylmercury in
utero and in childhood is constant, and the fish they eat aren't highly
contaminated as the seafood in Minamata and the Faroe Island studies were.

Even though the world's fish contain slight amounts of mercury,
eating lots of fish carries no detectable health risk from low
levels of the substance, even for very young children and
pregnant women, concludes the most comprehensive study of the
subject yet.

The findings come from a nine-year University of Rochester study
conducted in the Republic of the Seychelles, an island nation in
the Indian Ocean where most people eat nearly a dozen fish meals
each week and whose mercury levels are about 10 times higher
than most U.S. citizens. Indeed, no harmful effects were seen in
children at levels up to 20 times the average U.S. level. The
work is published in the August 26 issue of the Journal of the
American Medical Association.

"We look at the Seychelles people as a sentinel population,"
says pediatric neurologist Gary Myers, who examined the
children. "If somebody who eats fish twice a day does not show
effects from mercury exposure, it's unlikely that somebody who
eats fish twice a week will be affected. And the fish they eat
in the Seychelles contains the same amount of mercury as fish
sold at supermarkets and eaten in the United States."

Adds first author Philip Davidson, an expert on developmental
disabilities who designed a battery of the most sophisticated
tests available to examine the children: "What we found in the
Seychelles is applicable to every woman, every man, and every
child around the world who eats ocean fish."
http://www.rochester.edu/pr/releases/med/mercury.htm

The truth shall set you free, numbnuts.


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