Vegan (alt.food.vegan) This newsgroup exists to share ideas and issues of concern among vegans. We are always happy to share our recipes- perhaps especially with omnivores who are simply curious- or even better, accomodating a vegan guest for a meal!

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 17-02-2005, 10:36 PM
Red
 
Posts: n/a
Default Soya baby formula

Hi group,

Im vegan, and my wife is vegetarian. We have a 3 month old which we are
currently feeding soya formula.

My wife has recently heard that Soya formula may be harmful to the
future health of our child, due to certain hormones that it may contain.

Can anyone point me in the direction of any web references that address
this issue? Or does anyone have an information that they which to share.

Many thank in advance,

Red.

  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 17-02-2005, 10:54 PM
Michael Balarama
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I had to swich my daughter to milk she did not do well when very young-bad
bones,growth and mental ablitites..drinking a little milk change all that..
she is 19 now and drinks very little she was about 6 when we added milk....
Michael
"Red" wrote in message
...
Hi group,

Im vegan, and my wife is vegetarian. We have a 3 month old which we are
currently feeding soya formula.

My wife has recently heard that Soya formula may be harmful to the
future health of our child, due to certain hormones that it may contain.

Can anyone point me in the direction of any web references that address
this issue? Or does anyone have an information that they which to share.

Many thank in advance,

Red.



  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 18-02-2005, 01:12 AM
Steve
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Red wrote:
Can anyone point me in the direction of any web references that address
this issue? Or does anyone have an information that they which to share.




Jack Norris vegan R.D. answers Mothering Magazine
################################################## ################
The following is typed in by hand ( no online edition ) from issue #41
of VegNews ( the current issue pages 58 - 59 ). All spelling and
typographical mistakes are mine.

##########################################
Nutrition

Dear Jack;

The May/June 2004 issue of Mothering Magazine ran an article, "The Whole
Soy Story," by Kaayla Daniel. Daniel stated that soy has not been proven
safe for human consumption. What is the truth? - Still confused about soy.


How Safe Is Soy?
by Jack Norris, RD ( registered dietitian ).

Dear Still Confused,

There are two issues to be explored:
soy foods for non-infants, and soy-based formula for infants.

Daniel says, "The soy industry's own figures show that soy consumption
in China, Indonesia, Japan, and Taiwan ranges from 9.3 to 36 grams per
day.... Compare this with a cup of tofu ( 252 grams ) or soy milk ( 240
grams)... In short, there is no historical precedent for eating the
large amounts of soy food now being consumed by infants fed soy formula
and vegetarians who favor soy as their main source of protein."

Data provided by Mark Messina, PhD, editor of The Soy Connection, shows
that of seven studies in Japan, soy intake averaged about 57 grams per
day; one study in China estimated soy consumption at 135 grams per day;
and a study in Singapore estimated nearly 36 grams per day.

Thus, according to these studies, the Japanese actually eat over twice
as much soy as what Daniel reports. This should provide some relief,
though the average vegetarian relying on soy still might eat
considerably more than the Japanese. People who are concerned should
refer to my January/February 2004 column ( or VeganHealth.org ), which
concluded that two-t0-three servings of soy per day are safe for most
people.

Soy Formula
Soy-based infant formula should be considered a separate issue because
infants on soy formula will often be eating a much higher percentage of
their diet as soy than would an adult eating two or three servings of
soy per day.

I found three studies relevant to the question of soy formula. Daniel
mentions one, a study from 1990, in which infants who received soy
formula were followed into their twenties and thirties to see if they
developed more reproductive problems that those receiving cows' milk
formula.

There were tow statistically significant findings. Women who had been
fed soy formula averaged five days of menstrual bleeding versus 4.7 days
for those raised on cows' milk formula. The soy group also suffered more
discomfort during their menstrual period. It is not known if there is
any real damage from these differences.

In secondary analysis( items the study was not designed to investigate
but which were measured anyway), there were two differences between the
groups:

Twenty-eight percent of the women in the soy group used allergy or
asthma medication versus 19% in the cows' milk group. However because
the study was not designed to determine differences in allergies or
asthma mediation usage, the authors said that a second study is needed
before conclusions can be drawn. Women in the soy group were also more
likely to use weight control drugs, though there was no difference in
body mass between the groups.

Daniel found more to this than did the authors of the actual study. She
says, "Indeed, data left out of the headlines and buried in the report
revealed higher incidences of allergies and asthma and higher rates of
cervical cancer, polycystic ovarian syndrome, blocked fallopian tubes,
and pelvic inflammatory disease."

Information on cervical cancer rates was not reported in the actual
study, but rather in a follow-up letter to the editors. In the soy
group, 3.1% of the women had cervical cancer vs 1.1% in the cows' milk
group. But the difference was not statistically significant( i.e., it
could be due to random chance ).

Findings that are not statistically significant should not be reported
as though they are real differences. If they are, then Daniel should
have pointed out that there was a case of testicular cancer in the cows'
milk group but none in the soy group.

Similarly, the differences in rates of polycystic ovarian syndrome,
blocked fallopian tube, and pelvic inflammatory disease were not
statistically significant, nor were many other findings, including
higher rates of endometriosis in the cows' milk group.


In a 1986 study, more children with diabetes were fed soy formula then
cows' milk, but this finding was also not statistically significant.

In a 1990 study, 37% of children with autoimmune thyroid disease(ATD)
had been fed formula containing soy while only 12% of their healthy
siblings had been fed such formula. The authors suggested two
explanations:[1] Infants with digestive problems are more likely to be
fed formula containing soy and have ATD, but with no connections between
soy and the disease. [2] Formula containing soy could increase the
chances of ATD for some children.

The authors conclude that more research on this is needed. I would
suggest that until more studies are done, infants who have a history of
autoimmune thyroid disease in their families might want to stay away
from soy formula or formulas containing soy.

--

Steve

Be A Healthy Vegan Or Vegetarian
http://www.geocities.com/beforewisdo...ealthyVeg.html

Steve's Home Page
http://www.geocities.com/beforewisdom/

"The great American thought trap: It is not real
unless it can be seen on television or bought in a
shopping mall"


  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 18-02-2005, 01:12 AM
Steve
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Red wrote:
Can anyone point me in the direction of any web references that address
this issue? Or does anyone have an information that they which to share.




Jack Norris vegan R.D. answers Mothering Magazine
################################################## ################
The following is typed in by hand ( no online edition ) from issue #41
of VegNews ( the current issue pages 58 - 59 ). All spelling and
typographical mistakes are mine.

##########################################
Nutrition

Dear Jack;

The May/June 2004 issue of Mothering Magazine ran an article, "The Whole
Soy Story," by Kaayla Daniel. Daniel stated that soy has not been proven
safe for human consumption. What is the truth? - Still confused about soy.


How Safe Is Soy?
by Jack Norris, RD ( registered dietitian ).

Dear Still Confused,

There are two issues to be explored:
soy foods for non-infants, and soy-based formula for infants.

Daniel says, "The soy industry's own figures show that soy consumption
in China, Indonesia, Japan, and Taiwan ranges from 9.3 to 36 grams per
day.... Compare this with a cup of tofu ( 252 grams ) or soy milk ( 240
grams)... In short, there is no historical precedent for eating the
large amounts of soy food now being consumed by infants fed soy formula
and vegetarians who favor soy as their main source of protein."

Data provided by Mark Messina, PhD, editor of The Soy Connection, shows
that of seven studies in Japan, soy intake averaged about 57 grams per
day; one study in China estimated soy consumption at 135 grams per day;
and a study in Singapore estimated nearly 36 grams per day.

Thus, according to these studies, the Japanese actually eat over twice
as much soy as what Daniel reports. This should provide some relief,
though the average vegetarian relying on soy still might eat
considerably more than the Japanese. People who are concerned should
refer to my January/February 2004 column ( or VeganHealth.org ), which
concluded that two-t0-three servings of soy per day are safe for most
people.

Soy Formula
Soy-based infant formula should be considered a separate issue because
infants on soy formula will often be eating a much higher percentage of
their diet as soy than would an adult eating two or three servings of
soy per day.

I found three studies relevant to the question of soy formula. Daniel
mentions one, a study from 1990, in which infants who received soy
formula were followed into their twenties and thirties to see if they
developed more reproductive problems that those receiving cows' milk
formula.

There were tow statistically significant findings. Women who had been
fed soy formula averaged five days of menstrual bleeding versus 4.7 days
for those raised on cows' milk formula. The soy group also suffered more
discomfort during their menstrual period. It is not known if there is
any real damage from these differences.

In secondary analysis( items the study was not designed to investigate
but which were measured anyway), there were two differences between the
groups:

Twenty-eight percent of the women in the soy group used allergy or
asthma medication versus 19% in the cows' milk group. However because
the study was not designed to determine differences in allergies or
asthma mediation usage, the authors said that a second study is needed
before conclusions can be drawn. Women in the soy group were also more
likely to use weight control drugs, though there was no difference in
body mass between the groups.

Daniel found more to this than did the authors of the actual study. She
says, "Indeed, data left out of the headlines and buried in the report
revealed higher incidences of allergies and asthma and higher rates of
cervical cancer, polycystic ovarian syndrome, blocked fallopian tubes,
and pelvic inflammatory disease."

Information on cervical cancer rates was not reported in the actual
study, but rather in a follow-up letter to the editors. In the soy
group, 3.1% of the women had cervical cancer vs 1.1% in the cows' milk
group. But the difference was not statistically significant( i.e., it
could be due to random chance ).

Findings that are not statistically significant should not be reported
as though they are real differences. If they are, then Daniel should
have pointed out that there was a case of testicular cancer in the cows'
milk group but none in the soy group.

Similarly, the differences in rates of polycystic ovarian syndrome,
blocked fallopian tube, and pelvic inflammatory disease were not
statistically significant, nor were many other findings, including
higher rates of endometriosis in the cows' milk group.


In a 1986 study, more children with diabetes were fed soy formula then
cows' milk, but this finding was also not statistically significant.

In a 1990 study, 37% of children with autoimmune thyroid disease(ATD)
had been fed formula containing soy while only 12% of their healthy
siblings had been fed such formula. The authors suggested two
explanations:[1] Infants with digestive problems are more likely to be
fed formula containing soy and have ATD, but with no connections between
soy and the disease. [2] Formula containing soy could increase the
chances of ATD for some children.

The authors conclude that more research on this is needed. I would
suggest that until more studies are done, infants who have a history of
autoimmune thyroid disease in their families might want to stay away
from soy formula or formulas containing soy.

--

Steve

Be A Healthy Vegan Or Vegetarian
http://www.geocities.com/beforewisdo...ealthyVeg.html

Steve's Home Page
http://www.geocities.com/beforewisdom/

"The great American thought trap: It is not real
unless it can be seen on television or bought in a
shopping mall"


  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 18-02-2005, 07:59 PM
Jerry Story
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Im vegan, and my wife is vegetarian. We have a 3 month old which we
are
currently feeding soya formula.


What's wrong with breast feeding?

My wife has recently heard that Soya formula may be harmful to the
future health of our child, due to certain hormones that it may

contain.

What about hormones in breast milk that soya formula does not contain?



  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 19-02-2005, 08:20 PM
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Your baby needs breast milk from a woman........not from a cow.

  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 26-02-2005, 09:20 AM
Chacmul (Warren Tully)
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Red wrote:

Im vegan, and my wife is vegetarian. We have a 3 month old which we are
currently feeding soya formula.


Can anyone point me in the direction of any web references that address
this issue? Or does anyone have an information that they which to share.


http://www.newscientist.com/article....mg17823951.000

The hormones you are referring to are phyto-estrogens, common in many
plant foods including soya.. They mimic female hormones and are
implicated in early puberty in girls and low sperm counts in males.

I am sure similar references can be found on other news sites - it has
been big news in recent times and of some concern to those of us who
have replaced meat with soy.

....W


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
What can one do with soya beans? Justin Thyme General Cooking 82 24-11-2015 08:03 PM
soya custard Janet General Cooking 3 19-08-2015 08:58 PM
Best dried soya mince Rob[_46_] Vegan 0 18-04-2014 08:04 AM
Converting Sourdough Formula To Non-Sourdough Formula KMIAA Baking 0 27-06-2011 08:28 PM
Soya milk makers t8769 Vegan 1 07-02-2007 12:12 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 09:18 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2019 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Food and drink"

 

Copyright © 2017