Vegan (alt.food.vegan) This newsgroup exists to share ideas and issues of concern among vegans. We are always happy to share our recipes- perhaps especially with omnivores who are simply curious- or even better, accomodating a vegan guest for a meal!

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Old 24-11-2011, 07:33 PM posted to soc.culture.indian,alt.fan.jai-maharaj,alt.religion.hindu,alt.food.vegan,alt.animals.ethics.vegetarian,alt.animals.rights.promotion,soc.culture.usa,alt.politics
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Default Where Turkey Is The Guest, Not The Entree

Where Turkey Is The Guest, Not The Entree

By Emma Jacobs
http://innovationtrail.org/people/emma-jacobs
NPR
Wednesday, November 23, 2011

Listen to the Story
All Things Considered [2 min 47 sec]
Add to Playlist

Download
http://pd.npr.org/anon.npr-mp3/npr/a...tc_16.mp3?dl=1

Transcript
http://www.npr.org/templates/transcr...yId=142594442*

[Caption] Isabella Colbdorf feeds salad to a turkey at this year's
Feeding of the Turkeys ceremony in Watkins Glen, in upstate New York,
on Nov. 20, 2011.

View image he
http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2011...322066361&s=51

Most people think of turkeys as the centerpiece of the Thanksgiving
meal. But at one farm, the turkeys are the guests.

At the 26th annual Feeding of the Turkeys ceremony in Watkins Glen,
in upstate New York, a line of turkeys come walking out the door of
the barn. They stroll towards long low tables set up on the lawn,
with scarlet tablecloths and seasonal squash centerpieces.

There, a feast awaits. There's pumpkin pie topped with cranberry, and
platters of green salad -- hold the dressing. The spread is
surrounded by a crowd of spectators.

"Hi sweetheart, Mommy's here," Jamie Cohen says to one of the birds.
She's named her Velma. Cohen lives in Baltimore, and drives five
hours one way to attend the feast. She has sponsored one of the
diners for years. Her chosen bird died of natural causes last winter.
(It costs a one-time fee of $30 to sponsor a bird.
http://www.adoptaturkey.org/ ) So she's picked out a new brown bird.

"I wanted to pick out a new turkey and she's as sweet as she can be,
loves to be petted, loves to be kissed and held," Cohen says.

As you might have guessed, Cohen doesn't serve up turkey at her
Thanksgiving meal.

"We don't want to eat them," Cohen says. "They're no different than
dogs and cats. They feel pleasure and pain."

The turkey feast is hosted by the Farm Sanctuary
http://www.farmsanctuary.org/ in Watkins Glen. Susie Coston, the
Sanctuary's manager, says she wants to show people how to honor the
birds that are normally part of Thanksgiving dinner.

"One of the things we try to do is to let people really meet them,"
Coston says. "They all have names. And they all have personalities.
And they all have friendships, and we want people to see them for who
they are."

Most of the turkeys chow down on their dishes.

There's one human VIP at the meal: Seth Tibbot, who created the
Tofurky. http://www.tofurky.com/ That's exactly what it sounds like -
- a "turkey" made out of tofu. He says Tofurkys will be on about
350,000 tables this holiday season.

At the end of the meal, Tibbott pets a very stuffed turkey named
Elizabeth.

"That's how I am, by the way, after Thanksgiving dinner," Tibbot
says, looking at the bird. "I get about two steps away and then I'm
down on the floor."

It's Tibbott's very first time here at the Feeding of the Turkeys. He
says it's transformative. "You don't really have face time with
turkeys in my line of work."

Tibbott says if he had any Tofurky on him, he would give the birds a
nibble. But he's not sure they would eat it.

Tags: turkey, Thanksgiving, agriculture, Food

More at:
http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/201...ee?ft=1&f=1001

Jai Maharaj, Jyotishi
Om Shanti

o Not for commercial use. Solely to be fairly used for the educational
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poster. The contents are protected by copyright law and the exemption for
fair use of copyrighted works.
o If you send private e-mail to me, it will likely not be read,
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e-mail and postal addresses, and live-voice telephone number.
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which may or may not have been specifically authorized by the copyright
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that this constitutes a 'fair use' of any such copyrighted material as
provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title
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subscribing to USENET newsgroups or visiting web sites. For more information
go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml
If you wish to use copyrighted material from this article for purposes of
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Since newsgroup posts are being removed
by forgery by one or more net terrorists,
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Old 28-11-2011, 06:34 PM posted to soc.culture.indian,alt.fan.jai-maharaj,alt.religion.hindu,alt.food.vegan,alt.animals.ethics.vegetarian,alt.animals.rights.promotion,soc.culture.usa,alt.politics
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Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 186
Default Where Turkey Is The Guest, Not The Entree

Where Turkey Is The Guest, Not The Entree

By Emma Jacobs
http://innovationtrail.org/people/emma-jacobs
NPR
Wednesday, November 23, 2011

Listen to the Story
All Things Considered [2 min 47 sec]
Add to Playlist

Download
http://pd.npr.org/anon.npr-mp3/npr/a...tc_16.mp3?dl=1

Transcript
http://www.npr.org/templates/transcr...yId=142594442*

[Caption] Isabella Colbdorf feeds salad to a turkey at this year's
Feeding of the Turkeys ceremony in Watkins Glen, in upstate New York,
on Nov. 20, 2011.

View image he
http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2011...322066361&s=51

Most people think of turkeys as the centerpiece of the Thanksgiving
meal. But at one farm, the turkeys are the guests.

At the 26th annual Feeding of the Turkeys ceremony in Watkins Glen,
in upstate New York, a line of turkeys come walking out the door of
the barn. They stroll towards long low tables set up on the lawn,
with scarlet tablecloths and seasonal squash centerpieces.

There, a feast awaits. There's pumpkin pie topped with cranberry, and
platters of green salad -- hold the dressing. The spread is
surrounded by a crowd of spectators.

"Hi sweetheart, Mommy's here," Jamie Cohen says to one of the birds.
She's named her Velma. Cohen lives in Baltimore, and drives five
hours one way to attend the feast. She has sponsored one of the
diners for years. Her chosen bird died of natural causes last winter.
(It costs a one-time fee of $30 to sponsor a bird.
http://www.adoptaturkey.org/ ) So she's picked out a new brown bird.

"I wanted to pick out a new turkey and she's as sweet as she can be,
loves to be petted, loves to be kissed and held," Cohen says.

As you might have guessed, Cohen doesn't serve up turkey at her
Thanksgiving meal.

"We don't want to eat them," Cohen says. "They're no different than
dogs and cats. They feel pleasure and pain."

The turkey feast is hosted by the Farm Sanctuary
http://www.farmsanctuary.org/ in Watkins Glen. Susie Coston, the
Sanctuary's manager, says she wants to show people how to honor the
birds that are normally part of Thanksgiving dinner.

"One of the things we try to do is to let people really meet them,"
Coston says. "They all have names. And they all have personalities.
And they all have friendships, and we want people to see them for who
they are."

Most of the turkeys chow down on their dishes.

There's one human VIP at the meal: Seth Tibbot, who created the
Tofurky. http://www.tofurky.com/ That's exactly what it sounds like -
- a "turkey" made out of tofu. He says Tofurkys will be on about
350,000 tables this holiday season.

At the end of the meal, Tibbott pets a very stuffed turkey named
Elizabeth.

"That's how I am, by the way, after Thanksgiving dinner," Tibbot
says, looking at the bird. "I get about two steps away and then I'm
down on the floor."

It's Tibbott's very first time here at the Feeding of the Turkeys. He
says it's transformative. "You don't really have face time with
turkeys in my line of work."

Tibbott says if he had any Tofurky on him, he would give the birds a
nibble. But he's not sure they would eat it.

Tags: turkey, Thanksgiving, agriculture, Food

More at:
http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/201...ee?ft=1&f=1001

Jai Maharaj, Jyotishi
Om Shanti


================================================== ===================
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telling others what and where to post, where to post and where not to
post, deliberately publishing lies about others and stalking them --
but fails miserably. He is really stressed out, and like his lap dog
Prem Thomas (who currently posts as "P. Rajah"), he is priming
himself for conditions such as stroke and heart disease.
================================================== ===================

o Not for commercial use. Solely to be fairly used for the educational
purposes of research and open discussion. The contents of this post may not
have been authored by, and do not necessarily represent the opinion of the
poster. The contents are protected by copyright law and the exemption for
fair use of copyrighted works.
o If you send private e-mail to me, it will likely not be read,
considered or answered if it does not contain your full legal name, current
e-mail and postal addresses, and live-voice telephone number.
o Posted for information and discussion. Views expressed by others are
not necessarily those of the poster who may or may not have read the article.

FAIR USE NOTICE: This article may contain copyrighted material the use of
which may or may not have been specifically authorized by the copyright
owner. This material is being made available in efforts to advance the
understanding of environmental, political, human rights, economic,
democratic, scientific, social, and cultural, etc., issues. It is believed
that this constitutes a 'fair use' of any such copyrighted material as
provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title
17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without
profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included
information for research, comment, discussion and educational purposes by
subscribing to USENET newsgroups or visiting web sites. For more information
go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml
If you wish to use copyrighted material from this article for purposes of
your own that go beyond 'fair use', you must obtain permission from the
copyright owner.

Since newsgroup posts are being removed
by forgery by one or more net terrorists,
this post may be reposted several times.
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Old 28-11-2011, 09:25 PM posted to soc.culture.indian,alt.fan.jai-maharaj,alt.religion.hindu,alt.food.vegan,alt.animals.ethics.vegetarian,alt.animals.rights.promotion
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Default Where Turkey Is The Guest, Not The Entree

On Thu, 24 Nov 2011 19:33:47 GMT, and/or www.mantra.com/jai
(Dr. Jai Maharaj) wrote:

Where Turkey Is The Guest, Not The Entree

By Emma Jacobs
http://innovationtrail.org/people/emma-jacobs
NPR
Wednesday, November 23, 2011

.. . .
"We don't want to eat them," Cohen says. "They're no different than
dogs and cats. They feel pleasure and pain."


Because there are so many different situations
involved in the raising of meat animals, it is completely
unfair to the animals to think of them all in the same
way, as eliminationists do. To think that all of it is
cruel, and to think of all animals which are raised for
the production of food in the same way, oversimplifies
and distorts one's interpretation of the way things
really are. Just as it would to think that there is no
cruelty or abuse at all.

Beef cattle spend nearly their entire lives outside
grazing, which is not a bad way to live. Veal are
confined to such a degree that they appear to have
terrible lives, so there's no reason to think of both
groups of animals in the same way.
Chickens raised as fryers and broilers, and egg
producers who are in a cage free environment--as well as
the birds who parent all of them, and the birds who parent
battery hens--are raised in houses, but not in cages. The
lives of those birds are not bad. Battery hens are confined
to cages, and have what appear to be terrible lives, so
there is no reason to think of battery hens and the other
groups in the same way.
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Old 02-12-2011, 01:37 AM posted to soc.culture.indian,alt.fan.jai-maharaj,alt.religion.hindu,alt.food.vegan,alt.animals.ethics.vegetarian,alt.animals.rights.promotion,soc.culture.usa,alt.politics
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Default Where Turkey Is The Guest, Not The Entree

On Mon, 28 Nov 2011 18:34:45 GMT, and/or www.mantra.com/jai
(Dr. Jai Maharaj) wrote:

On Mon, 28 Nov 2011 13:25:57 -0800, [email protected] wrote:

Because there are so many different situations
involved in the raising of meat animals, it is completely
unfair to the animals to think of them all in the same
way, as eliminationists do. To think that all of it is
cruel, and to think of all animals which are raised for
the production of food in the same way, oversimplifies
and distorts one's interpretation of the way things
really are. Just as it would to think that there is no
cruelty or abuse at all.

Beef cattle spend nearly their entire lives outside
grazing, which is not a bad way to live. Veal are
confined to such a degree that they appear to have
terrible lives, so there's no reason to think of both
groups of animals in the same way.
Chickens raised as fryers and broilers, and egg
producers who are in a cage free environment--as well as
the birds who parent all of them, and the birds who parent
battery hens--are raised in houses, but not in cages. The
lives of those birds are not bad. Battery hens are confined
to cages, and have what appear to be terrible lives, so
there is no reason to think of battery hens and the other
groups in the same way.


Where Turkey Is The Guest, Not The Entree


Since the animals we raise for food would not be alive
if we didn't raise them for that purpose, it's a distortion of
reality not to take that fact into consideration whenever
we think about the fact that the animals are going to be
killed. The animals are not being cheated out of any part
of their life by being raised for food, but instead they are
experiencing whatever life they get as a result of it.


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