Vegan (alt.food.vegan) This newsgroup exists to share ideas and issues of concern among vegans. We are always happy to share our recipes- perhaps especially with omnivores who are simply curious- or even better, accomodating a vegan guest for a meal!

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  #31 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 09-09-2004, 10:38 PM
r3ality
 
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Marvin Preuss wrote in message ...
is there a good alternative for eggs. when i was vegetarian i took some
eggs in the veggie burgers that it holds better together...what i can
take insted for that?
thank you alot


I've personally never tried this, but Dr. Greger suggested using 1
tablespoon ground Flax seeds to 3 tablespoons water and letting that
soak, that's the ratio anyway. According to him, this is some sort of
secret out of a vegan cookbook, one which I've never heard of. You
can check out his website at www.veganmd.com

  #32 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 09-09-2004, 11:31 PM
menu boy
 
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"r3ality" wrote in message om...
Marvin Preuss wrote in message ...
is there a good alternative for eggs. when i was vegetarian i took some
eggs in the veggie burgers that it holds better together...what i can
take insted for that?
thank you alot


I've personally never tried this, but Dr. Greger suggested using 1
tablespoon ground Flax seeds to 3 tablespoons water and letting that
soak, that's the ratio anyway. According to him, this is some sort of
secret out of a vegan cookbook, one which I've never heard of. You
can check out his website at www.veganmd.com


I saw this in a macrobiotic book too....I think it was there anyway.


  #33 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 09-09-2004, 11:31 PM
menu boy
 
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"r3ality" wrote in message om...
Marvin Preuss wrote in message ...
is there a good alternative for eggs. when i was vegetarian i took some
eggs in the veggie burgers that it holds better together...what i can
take insted for that?
thank you alot


I've personally never tried this, but Dr. Greger suggested using 1
tablespoon ground Flax seeds to 3 tablespoons water and letting that
soak, that's the ratio anyway. According to him, this is some sort of
secret out of a vegan cookbook, one which I've never heard of. You
can check out his website at www.veganmd.com


I saw this in a macrobiotic book too....I think it was there anyway.


  #34 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 10-09-2004, 02:07 AM
BlueHeron
 
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r3ality wrote:

Marvin Preuss wrote in message ...

is there a good alternative for eggs. when i was vegetarian i took some
eggs in the veggie burgers that it holds better together...what i can
take insted for that?
thank you alot



I've personally never tried this, but Dr. Greger suggested using 1
tablespoon ground Flax seeds to 3 tablespoons water and letting that
soak, that's the ratio anyway. According to him, this is some sort of
secret out of a vegan cookbook, one which I've never heard of. You
can check out his website at www.veganmd.com


This works well for baking, but it does not work well as a binding agent.

I have used it before in cookies and cakes with much success.

-- Blue
  #35 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 10-09-2004, 02:07 AM
BlueHeron
 
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Default



r3ality wrote:

Marvin Preuss wrote in message ...

is there a good alternative for eggs. when i was vegetarian i took some
eggs in the veggie burgers that it holds better together...what i can
take insted for that?
thank you alot



I've personally never tried this, but Dr. Greger suggested using 1
tablespoon ground Flax seeds to 3 tablespoons water and letting that
soak, that's the ratio anyway. According to him, this is some sort of
secret out of a vegan cookbook, one which I've never heard of. You
can check out his website at www.veganmd.com


This works well for baking, but it does not work well as a binding agent.

I have used it before in cookies and cakes with much success.

-- Blue


  #36 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 10-09-2004, 03:43 AM
Randell Tarin
 
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Default

in article , BlueHeron at
ks wrote on 09/10/04 1:07 AM:



r3ality wrote:

Marvin Preuss wrote in message
...

is there a good alternative for eggs. when i was vegetarian i took some
eggs in the veggie burgers that it holds better together...what i can
take insted for that?
thank you alot



I've personally never tried this, but Dr. Greger suggested using 1
tablespoon ground Flax seeds to 3 tablespoons water and letting that
soak, that's the ratio anyway. According to him, this is some sort of
secret out of a vegan cookbook, one which I've never heard of. You
can check out his website at
www.veganmd.com

This works well for baking, but it does not work well as a binding agent.

I have used it before in cookies and cakes with much success.

-- Blue


I wonder how well Lecithin would work as a binder? Lecithin is the primary
component of egg whites that serves as the binder. Since it's from soy
sources, it fits into the vegan lifestyle. It's also extremely good for
you.

The liquid stuff is like an oily glue straight from the bottle, but it mixes
well into baking batters, smoothies etc. I haven't tried it as a binder for
veggie burgers, but it's worth a try.

  #37 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 10-09-2004, 03:43 AM
Randell Tarin
 
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Default

in article , BlueHeron at
ks wrote on 09/10/04 1:07 AM:



r3ality wrote:

Marvin Preuss wrote in message
...

is there a good alternative for eggs. when i was vegetarian i took some
eggs in the veggie burgers that it holds better together...what i can
take insted for that?
thank you alot



I've personally never tried this, but Dr. Greger suggested using 1
tablespoon ground Flax seeds to 3 tablespoons water and letting that
soak, that's the ratio anyway. According to him, this is some sort of
secret out of a vegan cookbook, one which I've never heard of. You
can check out his website at
www.veganmd.com

This works well for baking, but it does not work well as a binding agent.

I have used it before in cookies and cakes with much success.

-- Blue


I wonder how well Lecithin would work as a binder? Lecithin is the primary
component of egg whites that serves as the binder. Since it's from soy
sources, it fits into the vegan lifestyle. It's also extremely good for
you.

The liquid stuff is like an oily glue straight from the bottle, but it mixes
well into baking batters, smoothies etc. I haven't tried it as a binder for
veggie burgers, but it's worth a try.

  #38 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 10-09-2004, 05:40 PM
Ross Clement
 
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Default

[email protected] .com wrote in message ...
For any of you in the UK, I recently discovered xanthan gum in Tesco's
organic food section. It is vegan (a very fine powder - made from
fermented cabbage) and commonly used as a thickener in sauces and
dessets etc.

I did some experimenting last night, and for the first time ever, made
a bean burger that bound together while it fried.

Dave


Please can you post the full recipe you used.

Cheers,

Ross-c
  #39 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 11-09-2004, 09:16 PM
[email protected] .com
 
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Default

On 10 Sep 2004 09:40:49 -0700, (Ross Clement)
wrote:

[email protected] .com wrote in message ...
For any of you in the UK, I recently discovered xanthan gum in Tesco's
organic food section. It is vegan (a very fine powder - made from
fermented cabbage) and commonly used as a thickener in sauces and
dessets etc.

I did some experimenting last night, and for the first time ever, made
a bean burger that bound together while it fried.

Dave


Please can you post the full recipe you used.

Cheers,

Ross-c


Hi,

Actually I didn't use any special recipe- I just squashed half a tin
of (drained) chick peas and half a tin of (drained) butter beans
together by hand, together with a chopped onion, garlic puree, a blob
of mustard and then mixed in the following powder:

A good teaspoon each of: vegetable stock powder, curry powder and
xanthan gum powder with a big sprinkling of ground black pepper.

After kneading the whole lot together, it thickened into a nice dough.

I found the best way to fry it was to keep the oil on quite a low heat
and add the mix as single balls, keeping it moving as it cooked. After
a while it could be pressed down lightly to form the burger shape.

It still has a tendancy to stick to the pan but not as much as the dry
packet burger mixes do. I suspect it would cook well if it were
lightly covered in oil and roasted in the oven

On another occasion I also added breadcrumbs, ground oats and kidney
beans which also worked quite well.

The xanthan gum is sold as a gluten alternative, trademarked
"bodyline" and I've just found a url on the jar -
www.mhfoods.net
- along with a gluten free bread recipe.

I found this stuff in the gluten free/organic section of our local
Tesco and had left it in the cupboard for a few weeks before
re-discovering it and experimenting the other night. Just checked
again today and they are still selling it.

Dave
  #40 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 11-09-2004, 09:16 PM
[email protected] .com
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On 10 Sep 2004 09:40:49 -0700, (Ross Clement)
wrote:

[email protected] .com wrote in message ...
For any of you in the UK, I recently discovered xanthan gum in Tesco's
organic food section. It is vegan (a very fine powder - made from
fermented cabbage) and commonly used as a thickener in sauces and
dessets etc.

I did some experimenting last night, and for the first time ever, made
a bean burger that bound together while it fried.

Dave


Please can you post the full recipe you used.

Cheers,

Ross-c


Hi,

Actually I didn't use any special recipe- I just squashed half a tin
of (drained) chick peas and half a tin of (drained) butter beans
together by hand, together with a chopped onion, garlic puree, a blob
of mustard and then mixed in the following powder:

A good teaspoon each of: vegetable stock powder, curry powder and
xanthan gum powder with a big sprinkling of ground black pepper.

After kneading the whole lot together, it thickened into a nice dough.

I found the best way to fry it was to keep the oil on quite a low heat
and add the mix as single balls, keeping it moving as it cooked. After
a while it could be pressed down lightly to form the burger shape.

It still has a tendancy to stick to the pan but not as much as the dry
packet burger mixes do. I suspect it would cook well if it were
lightly covered in oil and roasted in the oven

On another occasion I also added breadcrumbs, ground oats and kidney
beans which also worked quite well.

The xanthan gum is sold as a gluten alternative, trademarked
"bodyline" and I've just found a url on the jar -
www.mhfoods.net
- along with a gluten free bread recipe.

I found this stuff in the gluten free/organic section of our local
Tesco and had left it in the cupboard for a few weeks before
re-discovering it and experimenting the other night. Just checked
again today and they are still selling it.

Dave


  #41 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 11-09-2004, 09:16 PM
[email protected] .com
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On 10 Sep 2004 09:40:49 -0700, (Ross Clement)
wrote:

[email protected] .com wrote in message ...
For any of you in the UK, I recently discovered xanthan gum in Tesco's
organic food section. It is vegan (a very fine powder - made from
fermented cabbage) and commonly used as a thickener in sauces and
dessets etc.

I did some experimenting last night, and for the first time ever, made
a bean burger that bound together while it fried.

Dave


Please can you post the full recipe you used.

Cheers,

Ross-c


Hi,

Actually I didn't use any special recipe- I just squashed half a tin
of (drained) chick peas and half a tin of (drained) butter beans
together by hand, together with a chopped onion, garlic puree, a blob
of mustard and then mixed in the following powder:

A good teaspoon each of: vegetable stock powder, curry powder and
xanthan gum powder with a big sprinkling of ground black pepper.

After kneading the whole lot together, it thickened into a nice dough.

I found the best way to fry it was to keep the oil on quite a low heat
and add the mix as single balls, keeping it moving as it cooked. After
a while it could be pressed down lightly to form the burger shape.

It still has a tendancy to stick to the pan but not as much as the dry
packet burger mixes do. I suspect it would cook well if it were
lightly covered in oil and roasted in the oven

On another occasion I also added breadcrumbs, ground oats and kidney
beans which also worked quite well.

The xanthan gum is sold as a gluten alternative, trademarked
"bodyline" and I've just found a url on the jar -
www.mhfoods.net
- along with a gluten free bread recipe.

I found this stuff in the gluten free/organic section of our local
Tesco and had left it in the cupboard for a few weeks before
re-discovering it and experimenting the other night. Just checked
again today and they are still selling it.

Dave
  #42 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 12-09-2004, 08:11 AM
Sarah Carter
 
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Default

[email protected] .com wrote in message
...

Actually I didn't use any special recipe- I just squashed half a tin
of (drained) chick peas and half a tin of (drained) butter beans
together by hand, together with a chopped onion, garlic puree, a blob
of mustard and then mixed in the following powder:

A good teaspoon each of: vegetable stock powder, curry powder and
xanthan gum powder with a big sprinkling of ground black pepper.

After kneading the whole lot together, it thickened into a nice dough.

I found the best way to fry it was to keep the oil on quite a low heat
and add the mix as single balls, keeping it moving as it cooked. After
a while it could be pressed down lightly to form the burger shape.

It still has a tendancy to stick to the pan but not as much as the dry
packet burger mixes do. I suspect it would cook well if it were
lightly covered in oil and roasted in the oven


I use a similar recipe for burgers. A tin of mashed chick peas, a grated
carrot and a grated onions all mixed together with a tablespoon of flour and
formed into a patty. I don't usually add any binder though, as they don't
usually fall apart.

I use the recipe to make fake meatballs to, just by changing their shape.

A recent addition I've found that can be nice is adding a handful of mung
bean sprouts to the mix.

Sarah
--


  #43 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 13-09-2004, 12:53 AM
Maree
 
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Hi Marvin,
try mixing in tofu - just mush it up and mix in with the other
ingredients. Me personally I have found its a matter of getting them
to quite a solid mix that I can easily form without it being too mushy
(which it can be after putting mainly veges in there) ... so I
'beef'(mind the pun it up with ground seeds and nuts as well as
oats.
hope that helps
Maree
www.healthyvegans.com



Marvin Preuss wrote in message ...
is there a good alternative for eggs. when i was vegetarian i took some
eggs in the veggie burgers that it holds better together...what i can
take insted for that?
thank you alot

  #44 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 13-09-2004, 12:53 AM
Maree
 
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Default

Hi Marvin,
try mixing in tofu - just mush it up and mix in with the other
ingredients. Me personally I have found its a matter of getting them
to quite a solid mix that I can easily form without it being too mushy
(which it can be after putting mainly veges in there) ... so I
'beef'(mind the pun it up with ground seeds and nuts as well as
oats.
hope that helps
Maree
www.healthyvegans.com



Marvin Preuss wrote in message ...
is there a good alternative for eggs. when i was vegetarian i took some
eggs in the veggie burgers that it holds better together...what i can
take insted for that?
thank you alot

  #45 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 17-09-2004, 05:20 AM
Megan Milligan
 
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Default

I've found Ener-G egg replacer (measure for measure, just folo the package
instructions) makes a good binder in some of the veggie burgers I made.
Also soak flax seeds in water for several hours until a gooey "gel" forms
that's the consistency of egg whites. This gel is often used as a egg
binder substitute in dishes. Don't know what the proportions would be
though.

--
Megan

"Alf" wrote in message
...
On Thu, 02 Sep 2004 19:01:58 +0200, Marvin Preuss

wrote:

Alf wrote:

The only way around the problem is to fry them quickly to seal
their outer edges. Try using larger buns as well so the burger
inside doesn't fall out into your lap.


but thats a really good idea and thank you alot


The burgers will still fall apart most probably, even if you
do fry them quickly, so your best option might be to use
pita bread instead and do away with buns altogether on
second thoughts.



---
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