Vegan (alt.food.vegan) This newsgroup exists to share ideas and issues of concern among vegans. We are always happy to share our recipes- perhaps especially with omnivores who are simply curious- or even better, accomodating a vegan guest for a meal!

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #46 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-11-2003, 07:57 PM
usual suspect
 
Posts: n/a
Default I have a small iron defficiency- which food should I eat?

Rubystars wrote:
Well I don't think they're poison but I do think that if someone eats too
many foods loaded with cholesterol it can't be good for them.


The issue isn't cholesterol, it's saturated fat. Many high cholesterol
foods, like fish, are beneficial for reducing LDL. From an earlier
thread (remember?):

Cholesterol from food doesn't have a direct link to *serum* cholesterol
levels. The more important culprits in raising serum LDL (the bad
cholesterol) are saturated fats and transfats, regardless of their source.

It's true that much of the fat from animal-based foods is saturated.
Many vegetable oils and related products are also saturated naturally or
artificially (hydrogenation). Many of the recipes offered on afv call
for margarine, which usually contains saturated fats and/or transfats.
This is one of my chief complaints. It makes no difference if one avoids
the cholesterol found in animal products if one's diet *still* contains
saturated fats. Those sat-fats and trans-fats will elevate one's
cholesterol levels whether one eats animal foods or not.

Unsaturated fats, be they from vegetable oils like olive or canola or
from animal fats like the healthy ones found in oily fish like salmon,
elevate HDL (good cholesterol) which helps transport and reduce LDL.
Fiber is also beneficial in controlling LDL levels. The distinction on
controlling cholesterol, specifically LDL, should be on dietary fats,
not on dietary cholesterol.

In general, saturated fats tend to raise the serum-cholesterol
level, while unsaturated fats and fiber tend to lower the
serum-cholesterol level. Therefore, it is prudent to lower one’s
intake of saturated fat, use your fat allowance primarily for
unsaturated fats, and eat more high-fiber foods. Foods which
contain saturated fat, unsaturated fat, or fiber may or may not
contain cholesterol.
http://www.unm.edu/~shc1/cholesterol.html

Also, meat DOES contain many vitamins and minerals, some of which are
deficient or missing in a veg-n diet. Eating fish and lean cuts is much
healthier than consuming foods with hydrogenated oils or naturally
saturated vegetable oils.
------
Let me further add that some saturated fats have beneficial qualities:

Stearic Acid in Chocolate and Its Neutral Effect on Cholesterol


The fat in chocolate, derived from cocoa butter, contains the
saturated fatty acids, stearic acid and palmitic acid, as well
as the unsaturated fatty acid, oleic acid.

Although, historically, it was found that SFA may raise
cholesterol, it has become apparent that all SFA do not have the
same hypercholesterolemic effect (1). In fact, research
indicates that stearic acid is unique. Unlike other saturated
fats, stearic acid may have a neutral effect on blood
cholesterol similar to oleic acid, which is important when
considering maintaining cardiovascular health (2). A proposed
mechanism for the similarity between oleic acid and stearic acid
is the rapid conversion of stearic acid to oleic acid by action
of a delta-9 desaturase in the liver (3).
http://www.chocolateinfo.com/sr/sr_article_11.jsp

And:
Unlike most saturated fats, stearic acid does not seem to
increase cholesterol levels in the blood, because liver enzymes
convert it to an unsaturated fat during digestion.
http://sci-toys.com/ingredients/stearic_acid.html

Stearic acid is found in most animal fats. I wouldn't call beef or
chocolate health foods, but they're acceptably healthy for most people
in moderation.

And finally (more to **** off vegans who make unfounded health claims),
here's more information on the benefits of beef from a beef industry
site. Note the info on CLAs (anti-cancer benefits) and especially the
part about iron.

http://www.betterbeef.com/heart_friendly_enjoy.html


  #47 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-11-2003, 08:17 PM
Peter
 
Posts: n/a
Default I have a small iron defficiency- which food should I eat?

You have a huge brain 'defficiency'

  #48 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 29-11-2003, 10:09 PM
sgdunn
 
Posts: n/a
Default I have a small iron defficiency- which food should I eat?

Something else to be aware of is that calcium and magnesium reduce iron
absorption. If you're taking a calcium or magnesium supplement, go off it
until your iron deficiency is eliminated.
Sulfur increases iron loss via the kidneys, in addition to increasing
losses of calcium, magnesium, zinc, and other odds and ends. The main
dietery sources of sulphur are the methionine and cystine in protein. On
average, plant protein is lower in sulfur than animal protein, but it still
has a considerable amount. Corn, rice, and wheat protein is high in sulfur.
If you've been purposely eating foods high in protein, as many vegans seem
to think they have to, stop.
Tannins (which are found at high levels in tea) reduce iron absorption.
In addition, phytic acid (found in all seeds, including beans, nuts and
whole grains) also reduces iron absorption by bonding with iron molecules.
(Phytates can't be absorbed. Obviously, eliminating it from your diet's not
an option, but it something to keep in mind, especially if you've been
trying to eat lots of beans, tofu, and whole grain foods.
Oxalic acid bonds with iron as well, reducing its absorbability. It's
found in all foods at varying levels. It's not as big a deal as some people
think it is, but I'd suggest that you not eat cooked or frozen spinich.
(Because of its high oxalic acid content, and because much of its iron hass
already bonded to oxalic acid either during cooking or while the leaves are
alive, cooked spinich actually reduces iron absorption.) "§odapop"
wrote in message
58...
(Jupiter) wrote in
om:

TIA,
Jupiter


this is from a web site
http://animal-ingredients.hypermart.net/
the web site is a booklet that is for vegans so they will know about

animal
ingredients and what to avoid.

"IRON is for proper formation of red blood cells and regulation of body
processes. Vegetable sources of iron are not as easily absorbed as animal
sources, but a good intake of vitamin C will enhance absorption. Iron can
be found in: prunes, whole grain cereals, black treacle, raisins, nuts,
leafy green vegetables, sesame seeds, soya flour, pulses, cocoa, curry
powder, wholemeal bread, molasses, dried fruits (especially apricots and
figs). Cook in cast iron."

Here are a couple of other web pages that might be of help
http://www.veganhealth.org/shv/ (click on the Iron link)
http://www.viva.org.uk/Viva!Guides/nutshell-2.htm
and
http://www.vegansociety.com/html/food/nutrition/
(again click onthe Iron link)

Here is a web page with Vegan acceptable vitamins and iron suppliments
http://www.veganessentials.com/front.html

Hope this helps!
peace!
sodapop
((=-0



  #49 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 30-11-2003, 01:13 PM
MEow
 
Posts: n/a
Default I have a small iron defficiency- which food should I eat?

While frolicking around in alt.food.vegan, Rubystars of SBC
http://yahoo.sbc.com said:

The only health store I've been able to find sells a bunch of quack
"homeopathic" crap and "coral calcium" crap and hardly anything that's
actually useful. I think the only food product they even carry is Stevia.

Yeah, I still can't get over the irony of health food shops which
don't sell food. I can be hard to find a good health food shop in some
places. When I lived in Denmark, the one I found was 45 minutes away,
by train, but it was close to where my mother lived, so I combined 2
visits. Here, there's a pretty good one about 15 minutes away, by bus
(plus 10-15 minutes walking to the bus), and a really good one further
away, by train. When I go to the second one, I tend to combine it with
a visit to the Asian shop, my favourite cafe, or something like that,
and make a trip out of it. If you manage to find a good health food
shop, which is a bit away, maybe you have the time to do something
similar once in a while. Otherwise, ordering online might be your only
option.
--
Nikitta a.a. #1759 Apatriot(No, not apricot)#18
ICQ# 251532856
Unreferenced footnotes: http://www.nut.house.cx/cgi-bin/nemwiki.pl?ISFN
"Benighted lot, them RLers." Sn!pe (Sheddie)
  #50 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 30-11-2003, 01:55 PM
MEow
 
Posts: n/a
Default I have a small iron defficiency- which food should I eat?

While frolicking around in alt.food.vegan, sgdunn of Cox
Communications said:

Oxalic acid bonds with iron as well, reducing its absorbability. It's
found in all foods at varying levels. It's not as big a deal as some people
think it is, but I'd suggest that you not eat cooked or frozen spinich.
(Because of its high oxalic acid content, and because much of its iron hass
already bonded to oxalic acid either during cooking or while the leaves are
alive, cooked spinich actually reduces iron absorption.) "§odapop"


Does the idea that you shouldn't reheat spinach, or at least not
freeze it again once you've thawed it, hold any truth to it?
--
Nikitta a.a. #1759 Apatriot(No, not apricot)#18
ICQ# 251532856
Unreferenced footnotes: http://www.nut.house.cx/cgi-bin/nemwiki.pl?ISFN
"Benighted lot, them RLers." Sn!pe (Sheddie)


  #51 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 30-11-2003, 03:04 PM
usual suspect
 
Posts: n/a
Default I have a small iron defficiency- which food should I eat?

sgdunn top-posted (dammit):
Something else to be aware of is that calcium and magnesium reduce iron
absorption. If you're taking a calcium or magnesium supplement, go off it
until your iron deficiency is eliminated.


Better yet, ask a dietician who has access to his/her last blood
profile. Many people who have one deficiency often have another. What
good is it to increase one mineral at the expense of another? You people
would amuse me if someone's health weren't at stake here.

Sulfur increases iron loss via the kidneys, in addition to increasing
losses of calcium, magnesium, zinc, and other odds and ends. The main
dietery sources of sulphur are the methionine and cystine in protein. On
average, plant protein is lower in sulfur than animal protein, but it still
has a considerable amount. Corn, rice, and wheat protein is high in sulfur.
If you've been purposely eating foods high in protein, as many vegans seem
to think they have to, stop.


Geez, you perverted fruitcake. The OP needs a dietician. He or she has
at least two underlying health issues, both of which are too serious for
a bunch of vegan activists on usenet to play doctor. One of the first
things a dietician is going to stress is how the OP can control his/her
diabetes. Protein is an important part of reducing glycemic load in
diabetics, asshole. Stop playing with someone else's health.

Tannins (which are found at high levels in tea) reduce iron absorption.
In addition, phytic acid (found in all seeds, including beans, nuts and
whole grains) also reduces iron absorption by bonding with iron molecules.
(Phytates can't be absorbed. Obviously, eliminating it from your diet's not
an option, but it something to keep in mind, especially if you've been
trying to eat lots of beans, tofu, and whole grain foods.
Oxalic acid bonds with iron as well, reducing its absorbability. It's
found in all foods at varying levels. It's not as big a deal as some people
think it is, but I'd suggest that you not eat cooked or frozen spinich.
(Because of its high oxalic acid content, and because much of its iron hass
already bonded to oxalic acid either during cooking or while the leaves are
alive, cooked spinich actually reduces iron absorption.)


So what can the OP eat, Dr Einstein? Remember, he/she has diabetes as
well as being borderline anemic. Come on, be a good little quack and
give him/her some menu ideas.

  #52 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 30-11-2003, 06:17 PM
Rubystars
 
Posts: n/a
Default I have a small iron defficiency- which food should I eat?


"MEow" wrote in message
...
While frolicking around in alt.food.vegan, Rubystars of SBC
http://yahoo.sbc.com said:

The only health store I've been able to find sells a bunch of quack
"homeopathic" crap and "coral calcium" crap and hardly anything that's
actually useful. I think the only food product they even carry is Stevia.

Yeah, I still can't get over the irony of health food shops which
don't sell food.


Well they're fine if you like duck, because they're full of quack products.

I can be hard to find a good health food shop in some
places. When I lived in Denmark, the one I found was 45 minutes away,
by train, but it was close to where my mother lived, so I combined 2
visits. Here, there's a pretty good one about 15 minutes away, by bus
(plus 10-15 minutes walking to the bus), and a really good one further
away, by train. When I go to the second one, I tend to combine it with
a visit to the Asian shop, my favourite cafe, or something like that,
and make a trip out of it.


That sounds fun.

If you manage to find a good health food
shop, which is a bit away, maybe you have the time to do something
similar once in a while. Otherwise, ordering online might be your only
option.


Yeah, I think it probably would be.

-Rubystars


  #53 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 30-11-2003, 08:56 PM
MEow
 
Posts: n/a
Default I have a small iron defficiency- which food should I eat?

While frolicking around in alt.food.vegan, Rubystars of SBC
http://yahoo.sbc.com said:

I can be hard to find a good health food shop in some
places. When I lived in Denmark, the one I found was 45 minutes away,
by train, but it was close to where my mother lived, so I combined 2
visits. Here, there's a pretty good one about 15 minutes away, by bus
(plus 10-15 minutes walking to the bus), and a really good one further
away, by train. When I go to the second one, I tend to combine it with
a visit to the Asian shop, my favourite cafe, or something like that,
and make a trip out of it.


That sounds fun.

It tends to be, though there's some danger in going to an area which
has all of those thing, and a veggie-restaurant, so I don't do it too
often ;0)
--
Nikitta a.a. #1759 Apatriot(No, not apricot)#18
ICQ# 251532856
Unreferenced footnotes: http://www.nut.house.cx/cgi-bin/nemwiki.pl?ISFN
"Benighted lot, them RLers." Sn!pe (Sheddie)
  #54 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 30-11-2003, 08:59 PM
MEow
 
Posts: n/a
Default I have a small iron defficiency- which food should I eat?

While frolicking around in alt.food.vegan, Rubystars of SBC
http://yahoo.sbc.com said:

Well I don't think they're poison but I do think that if someone eats too
many foods loaded with cholesterol it can't be good for them.

Well, you don't first say that you avoid animal products for
health-reasons, and then tell other people to include same in their
diet, for health reasons, so there's no contradiction there.

There's many people who go by meat in moderation, and if it works for
them, fine by me. People should eat what they think is right for them.
--
Nikitta a.a. #1759 Apatriot(No, not apricot)#18
ICQ# 251532856
Unreferenced footnotes: http://www.nut.house.cx/cgi-bin/nemwiki.pl?ISFN
"Benighted lot, them RLers." Sn!pe (Sheddie)
  #55 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 30-11-2003, 10:18 PM
Rubystars
 
Posts: n/a
Default I have a small iron defficiency- which food should I eat?


"MEow" wrote in message
news
While frolicking around in alt.food.vegan, Rubystars of SBC
http://yahoo.sbc.com said:

Well I don't think they're poison but I do think that if someone eats too
many foods loaded with cholesterol it can't be good for them.

Well, you don't first say that you avoid animal products for
health-reasons, and then tell other people to include same in their
diet, for health reasons, so there's no contradiction there.

What might be healthy for one person might not for another.

For example, when my grandmother was sick and she was losing weight even
though she was drinking ensure and eating toast, the nurses told us to give
her ice cream mixed in with the ensure to add in extra calories. That did
the trick and she went back to her normal weight.

Now we know that ice cream generally isn't considered health food, but in
that case it was healthy and it helped her to recover.

In general people should avoid consuming too much red meat and probably not
eat too much meat anyway. However, for someone with an iron deficiency and
who knows what else, a big juicy steak might be what helps them, even if
it's generally considered to be an unhealthy choice.

Someone who is allergic to peanut butter and who avoids it for health
reasons, may recommend peanut butter to someone else if they need a little
extra protein, for example.

There's many people who go by meat in moderation, and if it works for
them, fine by me. People should eat what they think is right for them.


Yeah. I'd like to eat less meat than I do right now. That's why I'm looking
into a lot more vegetarian type recipes.

-Rubystars




  #56 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 30-11-2003, 10:56 PM
MEow
 
Posts: n/a
Default I have a small iron defficiency- which food should I eat?

While frolicking around in alt.food.vegan, Rubystars of SBC
http://yahoo.sbc.com said:

What might be healthy for one person might not for another.

For example, when my grandmother was sick and she was losing weight even
though she was drinking ensure and eating toast, the nurses told us to give
her ice cream mixed in with the ensure to add in extra calories. That did
the trick and she went back to her normal weight.

Now we know that ice cream generally isn't considered health food, but in
that case it was healthy and it helped her to recover.

In general people should avoid consuming too much red meat and probably not
eat too much meat anyway. However, for someone with an iron deficiency and
who knows what else, a big juicy steak might be what helps them, even if
it's generally considered to be an unhealthy choice.

Someone who is allergic to peanut butter and who avoids it for health
reasons, may recommend peanut butter to someone else if they need a little
extra protein, for example.

I see your point.

There's many people who go by meat in moderation, and if it works for
them, fine by me. People should eat what they think is right for them.


Yeah. I'd like to eat less meat than I do right now. That's why I'm looking
into a lot more vegetarian type recipes.

Good move. I'm trying to cut down on sugar, myself, as it's the main
Bad Thing in my diet.

I don't know if eating lots of clementines goes against that, but I do
enjoy clementines, and the supermarkets have begun selling them now. I
don't know how it is where you are, but it's a christmassy thing here;
outside November/December you hardly ever see them.
--
Nikitta a.a. #1759 Apatriot(No, not apricot)#18
ICQ# 251532856
Unreferenced footnotes: http://www.nut.house.cx/cgi-bin/nemwiki.pl?ISFN
"Benighted lot, them RLers." Sn!pe (Sheddie)
  #57 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 30-11-2003, 11:57 PM
Rubystars
 
Posts: n/a
Default I have a small iron defficiency- which food should I eat?


"MEow" wrote in message
snip

There's many people who go by meat in moderation, and if it works for
them, fine by me. People should eat what they think is right for them.


Yeah. I'd like to eat less meat than I do right now. That's why I'm

looking
into a lot more vegetarian type recipes.

Good move. I'm trying to cut down on sugar, myself, as it's the main
Bad Thing in my diet.

I don't know if eating lots of clementines goes against that, but I do
enjoy clementines, and the supermarkets have begun selling them now. I
don't know how it is where you are, but it's a christmassy thing here;
outside November/December you hardly ever see them.


I had to go look them up to find out what clementines were, but I see
they're mandarin oranges. A lot of people here like to eat citrus fruits and
nuts this time of year.

-Rubystars


  #58 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 01-12-2003, 06:44 PM
usual suspect
 
Posts: n/a
Default I have a small iron defficiency- which food should I eat?

Rubystars wrote:
snip
In general people should avoid consuming too much red meat and probably not
eat too much meat anyway.


It's not too big of an issue if it's lean. Not all "red meat" is the same.

However, for someone with an iron deficiency and
who knows what else, a big juicy steak might be what helps them, even if
it's generally considered to be an unhealthy choice.


Even a little meat in moderation should benefit someone with anemia. One
of the studies I didn't cite before showed that nonheme iron was
absorbed more easily in the presence of heme iron from meat. The study
showed that just eating 50 or 75 grams (about an eighth of a pound) of
pork increased nonheme absorption by 44% to 57% (respectively on 50g and
75g trials).

http://tinyurl.com/x8b2

snip



Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
PIC: Food cooked on a small grill jmcquown[_2_] General Cooking 18 15-06-2016 11:27 AM
The Economist: Boutique food shops - As supermarkets flounder,small food and drink retailers are booming Ed Pawlowski General Cooking 4 18-12-2014 11:59 AM
The Economist: Boutique food shops - As supermarkets flounder, small food and drink retailers are booming Oregonian Haruspex General Cooking 0 17-12-2014 11:59 PM
I love Food Small cybercat General Cooking 5 15-03-2009 06:16 PM
Best Small Food Processor cybercat General Cooking 25 29-03-2007 12:58 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 03:13 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©2004-2020 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Food and drink"

 

Copyright © 2017