Tea (rec.drink.tea) Discussion relating to tea, the world's second most consumed beverage (after water), made by infusing or boiling the leaves of the tea plant (C. sinensis or close relatives) in water.

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Old 25-07-2005, 11:59 AM
 
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Default Lu Yus tomb

Hello,
does anyone happen to exactly where is Lu Yu=B4s tomb? I saw a picture
of his memorial stone in one Chinese language tea book but in the text
it was not mentioned where it is situated. In one poorly translated
French book about Chinese tea (originally written by a Chinese)I read,
that his final resting place was unknown for a long time but apparently
they have found it or at least otimistically believe to have found it.
Yugen.


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Old 26-07-2005, 09:01 PM
Livio Zanini
 
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I know of a memorial pavillion in Tianmen county, Hunan province, but I have
never heard of his tomb. I am just afraind that the "discovery" of such a
tomb would be just a smart way to improve the tourism in an area claiming a
tea legacy. It reminds me the Zhongling spring re-decoverded in Zhenjiang at
the beginning of XX century and the adjacent site of Guo Pu' s tomb.




ha scritto nel messaggio
ups.com...
Hello,
does anyone happen to exactly where is Lu Yus tomb? I saw a picture
of his memorial stone in one Chinese language tea book but in the text
it was not mentioned where it is situated. In one poorly translated
French book about Chinese tea (originally written by a Chinese)I read,
that his final resting place was unknown for a long time but apparently
they have found it or at least otimistically believe to have found it.
Yugen.


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Old 27-07-2005, 09:43 AM
 
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Ciao Livio!
Yes, I know that rather modest looking pavilion in his native village
too. Actually I have not been there myself, but it was visited by the
camera group in one Chinese triple-DVD on tea culture that I bought in
Hong Kong few years ago.
But the photograph of his supposed burial place was in one of the quite
many recent Chinese editions of "Chajing" (Classic of Tea) and under
the picture it was written simply "Lu Yu=B4s tomb" without any futher
explanations where it might be located.
For a tea devotee like myself, that would be an obvious place to visit
and burn an incence or two. So if it really exists somewhere, it is
surprising that the local tourist organizations do not make more noise
about it. The worst case would be of course , that there exists or
gradually start to appear several Lu Yu=B4s tombs in various places!
Best wishes, Yugen

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Old 27-07-2005, 10:31 AM
icetea
 
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what? luyu's tomb!... i really doubt it because as of this day know one
even knows what he looked like, what i mean is there are not paintings,
or drawings of him, alot of people, scholars and such, including me and
Livio Zanini, would love to know what he looked like if it is true then
he really needs to be dug up just to get a peek, you might have seen
sculptures of lu yu, but i can assure you they are only what has been
accepted over the years to be his image. he actually was ugly or at
least we can say not handsome, not like the sculptures. i am getting
my info from historians that study and write about him in china/taiwan.
i have seen some pictures of some monuments dedicated to him in china
icetea

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Old 28-07-2005, 01:09 AM
Livio Zanini
 
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ha scritto nel messaggio
oups.com...
Ciao Livio!
Yes, I know that rather modest looking pavilion in his native village
too. Actually I have not been there myself, but it was visited by the
camera group in one Chinese triple-DVD on tea culture that I bought in
Hong Kong few years ago.
But the photograph of his supposed burial place was in one of the quite
many recent Chinese editions of "Chajing" (Classic of Tea) and under
the picture it was written simply "Lu Yus tomb" without any futher
explanations where it might be located.
For a tea devotee like myself, that would be an obvious place to visit
and burn an incence or two. So if it really exists somewhere, it is
surprising that the local tourist organizations do not make more noise
about it. The worst case would be of course , that there exists or
gradually start to appear several Lu Yus tombs in various places!
Best wishes, Yugen

That won't be too strange, since there are three or four tombs of general
Guan Yu.
I hope to find something about Lu Yu's tomb... of course there won't be so
many, since he had not his head cutted and buried in a different place like
Guan Yu.
Livio




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