Tea (rec.drink.tea) Discussion relating to tea, the world's second most consumed beverage (after water), made by infusing or boiling the leaves of the tea plant (C. sinensis or close relatives) in water.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #61 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 27-06-2005, 02:27 AM
Melinda
 
Posts: n/a
Default

much snippage

Hey on that topic I have a quesiton-what is meant by the "bamboo" quality?
Because I ahve a bamboo puer from David Hoffman (packed in a bamboo tube)
and I can't pick out a "bamboo-ness"...can you elaborate (whomever) on what
you mean and what I should look for? Shoul a bamboo shu taste as different
from a non-bamboo shu and a shu does from a sheng for instance?

Very interesting.

Melinda


Michael Plant wrote:



6) I have another pot that I got from James Bana at Pu-erhtea.com that
I use for Bamboo Puerhs. They are different enough to warrant their own
pot.


On that topic, regarding the latest canes we've been talking about and
exploring elsewhere, could you talk more about the "bamboo" quality,
which,
it struck me soundly a couple days ago, was a *very* powerful element. If
that was in fact the case, I'm not sure I'm all that fond of a "bamboo"
taste component other than the quieter, less intrusive, and more
integrated
and balanced versions. What say you?

Michael




  #62 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 27-06-2005, 02:29 AM
Melinda
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Michael Plant" wrote in message
...

Nonetheless, There are teas out there that are truly rare, truly
wonderful,
and truly expensive. Ultimately, it's all a matter of taste and style, eh?
Besides, in Chinatown you get to pour over hundreds of pretty tea boxes
with
pastoral scenes and pretty ladies pointing at tea leaves with that come
hither look. But, from our main purpose I digress. Let me stop while I'm
ahead.

Michael


I want a teabox with a pretty guy on it with a come-hither look..if anyone
sees one let me know, ok? ;D

Melinda


  #63 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 27-06-2005, 04:00 AM
Mike Petro
 
Posts: n/a
Default

[Mike Petro]
In my limited experience the market value of puerh is based on several
factors:

1) The factories reputation
2) The production recipe used
3) How well the cake was stored
4) The quality of production that year
5) The quantity of the crop in the given year
6) The reputation for that particular vintage/recipe.
7) Other factors such as limited edition batches etc
8) What the market will bear......


[Michael Plant]
It would be fascinating to perform a *weighted* average calculation
on your list. I'd place 50% of the weight on eight.


[Mike Petro]
In the USA market I would agree with you. In the better Eastern shops
the first 7 carry a lot more weight than they do here.
Mike Petro
http://www.pu-erh.net
"In this work, when it shall be found that much is omitted, let it not be forgotten that much likewise is performed."
Samuel Johnson, 1775, upon finishing his dictionary.
  #64 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 27-06-2005, 04:28 AM
Mike Petro
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Fri, 24 Jun 2005 09:16:01 GMT, Michael Plant
wrote:

On that topic, regarding the latest canes we've been talking about and
exploring elsewhere, could you talk more about the "bamboo" quality, which,
it struck me soundly a couple days ago, was a *very* powerful element. If
that was in fact the case, I'm not sure I'm all that fond of a "bamboo"
taste component other than the quieter, less intrusive, and more integrated
and balanced versions. What say you?


Regarding the "Bamboo component" I have found a very wide range of
noticeable flavor. The handmade nature of these teas seems to lend
itself to wide variations even within a given brand. I have
experienced everything from an almost perfume like thick fragrance to
a barely noticeable hint of something extra. For what its worth I
prefer a light influence on my sheng puerhs but a heavier influence on
my shu puerhs. The characteristics I associate with the "bamboo
component" are likened to grass, hay, and hints of grain.

Michael, the last batch of bamboo canes we shared was an anomaly in my
opinion. It seemed more like a heavily roasted oolong than a puerh to
me, albeit still tasty it was not typical.

The one noticeable exception to the variable consistency issue is the
larger diameter Menghai brand Dai Nationality puerh. The product is
very consistent from what I have seen. The Bamboo component is light
with the emphasis being on a sheng qualities rather than bamboo
fragrance. This one always comes removed from the bamboo cane and is
about 3 inches (6-7cm) in diameter. Seldom do you actually see the
Menghai label,look for it when you can, you can see an example at
http://www.teayn.com/teashop/product.asp?id=520


Mike Petro
http://www.pu-erh.net
"In this work, when it shall be found that much is omitted, let it not be forgotten that much likewise is performed."
Samuel Johnson, 1775, upon finishing his dictionary.
  #65 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 27-06-2005, 11:15 AM
Mike Petro
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Sun, 26 Jun 2005 18:27:35 -0700, "Melinda"
wrote:

Hey on that topic I have a quesiton-what is meant by the "bamboo" quality?
Because I ahve a bamboo puer from David Hoffman (packed in a bamboo tube)
and I can't pick out a "bamboo-ness"...can you elaborate (whomever) on what
you mean and what I should look for? Shoul a bamboo shu taste as different
from a non-bamboo shu and a shu does from a sheng for instance?


Hi Melinda, also see my other post this morning that talks about the
"bamboo component". The genre covers a wide range of teas. There is a
big difference between teas wrapped and stored in bamboo versus teas
compressed directly in bamboo and left there.

Yes, you can indeed tell the difference between a bamboo sheng versus
a regular sheng if the component is strong enough. I generally don't
taste that component in the teas that are simply compressed and then
stored in bamboo containers. The component is much more noticeable in
the teas compressed directly into a bamboo cane and allowed to age
there. I have tasted some shu bamboo canes where the component was
very strong, and pleasurable, but it was the type directly compressed
and stored in the cane.

I have seen and tasted those so-called smoked-pipe bamboo, the ones
where a stack of tablets is wrapped in paper and stored inside of a
bamboo tube with a removable cap, some descriptions claim it to be
compressed in bamboo and extracted and sliced. I don't buy that
description. If you inspect those tablets closely you will see that
the leaves are not sliced or broken on the surface, the leaves on the
surface are whole, they are clearly compressed into that tablet shape
much like the mini-tuocha. I have my doubts that they ever saw bamboo
before being packaged and stored.


Mike Petro
http://www.pu-erh.net
"In this work, when it shall be found that much is omitted, let it not be forgotten that much likewise is performed."
Samuel Johnson, 1775, upon finishing his dictionary.


  #66 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 27-06-2005, 11:59 AM
Alex Chaihorsky
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Mike Petro" wrote in message
...
On Sun, 26 Jun 2005 18:27:35 -0700, "Melinda"
wrote:

Hey on that topic I have a quesiton-what is meant by the "bamboo" quality?
Because I ahve a bamboo puer from David Hoffman (packed in a bamboo tube)
and I can't pick out a "bamboo-ness"...can you elaborate (whomever) on
what
you mean and what I should look for? Shoul a bamboo shu taste as different
from a non-bamboo shu and a shu does from a sheng for instance?


Hi Melinda, also see my other post this morning that talks about the
"bamboo component". The genre covers a wide range of teas. There is a
big difference between teas wrapped and stored in bamboo versus teas
compressed directly in bamboo and left there.

Yes, you can indeed tell the difference between a bamboo sheng versus
a regular sheng if the component is strong enough. I generally don't
taste that component in the teas that are simply compressed and then
stored in bamboo containers. The component is much more noticeable in
the teas compressed directly into a bamboo cane and allowed to age
there. I have tasted some shu bamboo canes where the component was
very strong, and pleasurable, but it was the type directly compressed
and stored in the cane.

I have seen and tasted those so-called smoked-pipe bamboo, the ones
where a stack of tablets is wrapped in paper and stored inside of a
bamboo tube with a removable cap, some descriptions claim it to be
compressed in bamboo and extracted and sliced. I don't buy that
description.


Absolutely. bamboo is NEVER perfectly round inside - always elliptical. If
you fill bamboo with tea it will take the shape of internal hollow of
bamboo- you will be able to see many features like grooves and such on the
surface of such tea. Such tablets are always perfectly round, though.

If you inspect those tablets closely you will see that
the leaves are not sliced or broken on the surface, the leaves on the
surface are whole, they are clearly compressed into that tablet shape
much like the mini-tuocha. I have my doubts that they ever saw bamboo
before being packaged and stored.


I agree. To slice such a tad cylinder would be an enourmous waste of tea
during slicing.

Sasha.

Mike Petro
http://www.pu-erh.net
"In this work, when it shall be found that much is omitted, let it not be
forgotten that much likewise is performed."
Samuel Johnson, 1775, upon finishing his dictionary.



  #68 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 27-06-2005, 12:27 PM
Michael Plant
 
Posts: n/a
Default


[Mike Petro]
Regarding the "Bamboo component" I have found a very wide range of
noticeable flavor. The handmade nature of these teas seems to lend
itself to wide variations even within a given brand. I have
experienced everything from an almost perfume like thick fragrance to
a barely noticeable hint of something extra. For what its worth I
prefer a light influence on my sheng puerhs but a heavier influence on
my shu puerhs. The characteristics I associate with the "bamboo
component" are likened to grass, hay, and hints of grain.

Michael, the last batch of bamboo canes we shared was an anomaly in my
opinion. It seemed more like a heavily roasted oolong than a puerh to
me, albeit still tasty it was not typical.


[Michael]
Thanks Mike, that's interesting and good to know. My experience with these
teas is more or less limited to two I'd gotten from Silk Road Teas (David
Hoffman) a year or two ago, and a couple samples sent to me by vendors, one
that Rick sent awhile back, and the canes we've shared. My favorite was
David's because it is most subtle, wherein the bamboo quality integrates
into the total picture more gently. Adding to my previoius description in
another post -- "flower-reedy," I think your "perfume like thick fragrance"
could also be said. I think we're getting to the bottom of it. Thanks too
for the pictures.

snip

Michael

  #69 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 27-06-2005, 04:30 PM
Rick Chappell
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Melinda wrote:
Hey on that topic I have a quesiton-what is meant by the "bamboo" quality?
Because I ahve a bamboo puer from David Hoffman (packed in a bamboo tube)
and I can't pick out a "bamboo-ness"...can you elaborate (whomever) on what
you mean and what I should look for? Shoul a bamboo shu taste as different
from a non-bamboo shu and a shu does from a sheng for instance?


I have one whose bamboo flavor is unmistakable. I own several bamboo
flutes, so have spent much of my life French-kissing the material, but
even so do not think that anyone else can miss it. Think bamboo
shoots. But there appears to be wide variability in these teas. I
get the feeling that they are manufactured in "unregulated
conditions", meaning out in the country around a campfire. Friends
and I have found several tubes in the same shipment to vary wildly in
taste, smell and appearance.

Best,

Rick.





  #70 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 27-06-2005, 07:58 PM
Scott Dorsey
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Melinda wrote:
I want a teabox with a pretty guy on it with a come-hither look..if anyone
sees one let me know, ok? ;D


I would be _very_ surprised if you couldn't get such a thing in Bangkok.
You might have problems finding a pretty guy with clothes on, though.
--scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."


  #71 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 27-06-2005, 11:52 PM
Melinda
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Clothing can be optional, I'm flexible, LMAO!

(OK, I'll stop now, lol...)

Melinda

P.S. Speaking of Bangkok...can anyone point me to teas sold that are from
(or made in) Thailand that are NOT thai tea (the orange anise flavored
stuff, you know), in other words, regular hong cha or even greens? Do they
grow any tea in Thailand? I can imagine tea infused with Thai flavors such
as ginger and hot chili and kaffir lime leaves and tamarind...it would be
different. Lemongrass too. Might make an interesting "savoury" tea....

--
"I know. You know I know. I know you know I know. We know Henry knows,
and Henry knows we know it."

We're a knowledgeable family." ::smiles:: -Geoffrey, Lion in Winter
"Scott Dorsey" wrote in message
...
Melinda wrote:
I want a teabox with a pretty guy on it with a come-hither look..if anyone
sees one let me know, ok? ;D


I would be _very_ surprised if you couldn't get such a thing in Bangkok.
You might have problems finding a pretty guy with clothes on, though.
--scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."



  #72 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-06-2005, 11:05 AM
Michael Plant
 
Posts: n/a
Default


[Melinda]
Hey on that topic I have a quesiton-what is meant by the "bamboo" quality?
Because I ahve a bamboo puer from David Hoffman (packed in a bamboo tube)
and I can't pick out a "bamboo-ness"...can you elaborate (whomever) on what
you mean and what I should look for? Shoul a bamboo shu taste as different
from a non-bamboo shu and a shu does from a sheng for instance?


[Rick]
I have one whose bamboo flavor is unmistakable. I own several bamboo
flutes, so have spent much of my life French-kissing the material, but
even so do not think that anyone else can miss it. Think bamboo
shoots. But there appears to be wide variability in these teas. I
get the feeling that they are manufactured in "unregulated
conditions", meaning out in the country around a campfire. Friends
and I have found several tubes in the same shipment to vary wildly in
taste, smell and appearance.


[Michael]
This gets interestinger and interestinger. Bamboo shoots? NOTHING like it,
*I think.* The quality that flies out at me is flower-reedy and, as Mike
had written, perfumey. This is unknown in other Pu'erhs. Mike also says that
the primary example I've used for this description is something of an
anomoly. Rick, you might recall sending along a "China Yunnan Famous Tea --
Aroma Bamboo Tea" (from the label) encased in bamboo. That one also has this
quality. I don't know what to say. Obviously there are wild fluxuations in
the bamboo effect, undoubtedly encouraged by a lack of regulation and
control. What can I say?

Let's here more.

Michael

  #73 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-06-2005, 11:10 AM
Michael Plant
 
Posts: n/a
Default


[Melinda]
I want a teabox with a pretty guy on it with a come-hither look..if anyone
sees one let me know, ok? ;D


[Scott]
I would be _very_ surprised if you couldn't get such a thing in Bangkok.
You might have problems finding a pretty guy with clothes on, though.
--scott


[Michael]
Melinda, always in the service of humanity, I purused the tea section of the
Chinese shop I was in yesterday -- Great Wall, on Canal, for you New Yorkers
-- and found several boxes with pretty young ladies thereon, but nary a one
with a pretty young man. Better fly to Bangkok, as Scott suggests.

Michael

  #74 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-06-2005, 11:46 AM
Mike Petro
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Tue, 28 Jun 2005 10:05:17 GMT, Michael Plant
wrote:

Rick, you might recall sending along a "China Yunnan Famous Tea --
Aroma Bamboo Tea" (from the label) encased in bamboo. That one also has this
quality. I don't know what to say. Obviously there are wild fluxuations in
the bamboo effect, undoubtedly encouraged by a lack of regulation and
control. What can I say?


That one that Rick brought back with him was a cooked bamboo puer with
a very strong "bamboo component". I liked it a lot!
Mike Petro
http://www.pu-erh.net
"In this work, when it shall be found that much is omitted, let it not be forgotten that much likewise is performed."
Samuel Johnson, 1775, upon finishing his dictionary.
  #75 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-06-2005, 01:02 PM
Alex Chaihorsky
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Michael Plant" wrote in message
...

[Melinda]
I want a teabox with a pretty guy on it with a come-hither look..if
anyone
sees one let me know, ok? ;D


[Scott]
I would be _very_ surprised if you couldn't get such a thing in Bangkok.
You might have problems finding a pretty guy with clothes on, though.
--scott


[Michael]
Melinda, always in the service of humanity, I purused the tea section of
the
Chinese shop I was in yesterday -- Great Wall, on Canal, for you New
Yorkers
-- and found several boxes with pretty young ladies thereon, but nary a
one
with a pretty young man. Better fly to Bangkok, as Scott suggests.

Michael


Melinda, if things will start to look desperate, we can all send you our
photos with our own version of this come-hither look that you like so much.
Choose the best you like and glue it on you favorite tea-canister.

Sasha.




Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Yixing Tea Pog Anna Tea 1 13-08-2005 01:51 PM
Seasoning my yixing Melinda Tea 14 07-06-2005 07:41 AM
Loose green puerh and pressed teas that are not puerh. Mike Petro Tea 2 24-05-2005 12:31 PM
Yixing pot, or not? McLemore Tea 4 23-10-2003 12:41 AM
My first use of Yixing teapot Opother Tea 3 11-10-2003 04:38 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 02:54 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2022 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Food and drink"

 

Copyright © 2017