Tea (rec.drink.tea) Discussion relating to tea, the world's second most consumed beverage (after water), made by infusing or boiling the leaves of the tea plant (C. sinensis or close relatives) in water.

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  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Melinda
 
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Default Bai vs Mao Chinese tea terms

For those who speak Chinese or who can tell me...both of these are sort of
roughly translated as "white" or "downy"...can someone tell me the
sublteties or the differences if any?

And I've been really wanting to ask this: What does "Mao Tse-Tung" translate
as? Just very curious.

Melinda


--
"I know. You know I know. I know you know I know. We know Henry knows,
and Henry knows we know it."

We're a knowledgeable family." ::smiles:: -Geoffrey, Lion in Winter


  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Mydnight
 
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Bai is white (the character ri, which means sun is identical to bai
except for a dot on top if it), and Mao is hair. As far as individual
characters go, there aren't really many subtleties. When they are
among different characters, there can be much more information and
meaning. The more complex characters can have other characters added
together to mean something relating to those characters. For example,
the character for wood is Mu...two Mu will give you Lin which means
small forest...three Mu, sen, means big forest.

"Mao Tse-Tung" (Mao Zi Dong). Mao is the family name (same character
that also means hair). Zi is actually a little complex in that it
literally means a place with much water and plants; swamp. A portion
of the character 'jiang' can be seen in the character that means water,
and one of the other parts means plants (not totally sure about the
plants part...still learning!). Dong simply means east.

So we have: Hair, Swamp, East. Meaning...I don't know....perhaps only
his father knows.

It's confusing. heh.

  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Lewis Perin
 
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"Dog Ma 1" (reply w/o spam)> writes:

> > > I don't give a
> > > rat's ass for your educational background.

>
> > If you can't repute me on actual points, you can cover up with
> > profanity, again.

>
> Actually, from Michael it's not profanity but a high standard of
> comparison. A loose translation might be "I respect what you say,
> but not quite so much as an esteemed mammal's hindquarters." He's
> notoriously fond of small rodents, and apparently indiscriminate as
> to body parts.


Anyone else see a need for a rec.food.drink.tea.best-of?

/Lew
---
Lew Perin /
http://www.panix.com/~perin/babelcarp.html
  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Melinda
 
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Michael that's not the same thing as his Bamboo Fragrence puer is it? Have
you tried the Bamboo Fragrence and if so, what did you think?

Melinda


> This Dai Bamboo Pu'erh 1996 is very interesting. It is moving toward that
> soft wood/camphor thing with a touch of sweetness in place of its earlier
> floral thing. Also, the liquor has darkened over the past many months to
> an
> amber in place of that pale yellow of a truly young Pu'erh. I'm enjoying
> the
> difference between what I'm drinking today and what I drank of it a year
> and
> a half ago. Cool.
>
>



  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
Lewis Perin
 
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"Melinda" > writes:

> > This Dai Bamboo Pu'erh 1996 is very interesting. It is moving
> > toward that soft wood/camphor thing with a touch of sweetness in
> > place of its earlier floral thing. Also, the liquor has darkened
> > over the past many months to an amber in place of that pale yellow
> > of a truly young Pu'erh. I'm enjoying the difference between what
> > I'm drinking today and what I drank of it a year and a half
> > ago. Cool.
> >

> Michael that's not the same thing as his Bamboo Fragrence puer is
> it?


I'm not Michael, but I know that the answer is No.

> Have you tried the Bamboo Fragrence and if so, what did you think?


Still not Michael, I like it a lot. I'm getting near the end of a
batch I've been drinking sporadically for a couple of years, and I'll
miss it. It's mellow, mildly smoky, and good for lots of steeps.

/Lew
---
Lew Perin /
http://www.panix.com/~perin/babelcarp.html


  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Lewis Perin
 
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"Melinda" > writes:
> [...Bamboo Fragrance Puerh: cane or basket?...]
> I'm not Lew but the Bamboo Fragrence that I got from David
> Hoffman is in a bamboo cane as you describe. Whether it's "much less
> interesting" was what I was hoping to hear opinions on.


Well, I always thought there might be a reason to save old tea
invoices. Says here that on August 6, 2003 Silk Road Teas sent me
"P-BFP-1 Bamboo Fragrance Pu-erh, 500 gram (1.1 lb) packed in basket".

/Lew
---
Lew Perin /
http://www.panix.com/~perin/babelcarp.html
  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Space Cowboy
 
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I just ordered some 500g wild tree loose green pu wrapped in bamboo
leaf to form a tube. The seller didn't mention Fragrance but the
texture looked like large slimey moist leaf from the picture. I've
seen a similar presentation on TaoBao so more curiosity than taste.

Jim

Lewis Perin wrote:
> "Melinda" > writes:
> > [...Bamboo Fragrance Puerh: cane or basket?...]
> > I'm not Lew but the Bamboo Fragrence that I got from David
> > Hoffman is in a bamboo cane as you describe. Whether it's "much

less
> > interesting" was what I was hoping to hear opinions on.

>
> Well, I always thought there might be a reason to save old tea
> invoices. Says here that on August 6, 2003 Silk Road Teas sent me
> "P-BFP-1 Bamboo Fragrance Pu-erh, 500 gram (1.1 lb) packed in

basket".
>
> /Lew
> ---
> Lew Perin /
>
http://www.panix.com/~perin/babelcarp.html


  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Mike Petro
 
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Melinda wrote:
> I'll be darn...well I guess I just dunno then. I wish I had 500 grams

of it,
>
>
> Melinda


Melinda, you might try:
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...&rd=1&tc=photo

This is a "Bamboo Fragrance" type puerh similar to the others being
mentioned. It is loosely packed in bamboo leaf rather than tighly
compressed in a cane. Scott Wilson is a new player on Ebay but he
offers a nice selection of puerh.

I also recommend the Xishuangbana 50th aniversary bricks as being quite
good.
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...&rd=1&tc=photo

Mike
http://www.pu-erh.net

  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
samarkand
 
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Oh Rebecca

That comment was from Mydnight, who you think hasnot reacted badly, please
quote and snip appropriately.

I had never attacked him, I attacked his concept of believing that what he
think he knows is probably the correct one simply because he is in China -
reread his outburst on that one and tell me if there's another angle to it.
When it is pointed out to him that his interpretation may not be correct
because he hasn't interpret things in light of their contextual background,
he simplify the issue and made a sweeping comment that each person will have
his or her own interpretation.

Perhaps. Then let us consider Mydnight's interpretation once mo 'Zhe'
as in swamp, 'Dong' as in East, likely then, a person who grows up in the
eastern swamp - this is my paraphrase, but I don't think it is far from the
original.

Mao Zhe Dong, as I have mentioned, was the third son whose previous 2
siblings did not survive infancy. But he had two younger brothers, the
elder was named Zhe Min, 'Min' as in people. If you follow Mydnight's
interpretation, then Zhe Min should read as 'People of the swamp'. Duh?
Who would name a person singular as persons plural? In the same context,
you would think that Jiang Zhe Min, is also "people of the swamp"?

We understand your admiration of the Mydnigt's vim, but we are not talking
about his enthusiam here, we are discussing his errors in interpretation.

Danny

"Rebecca Ore" > wrote in message
...
> In article >,
> "samarkand" > wrote:
>
>> "These cracks about Westerners never understanding, does
>> not fully apply to me, and it's quite presumptious to assume."

>
> I was in an audience at Columbia University where a scholar reported on
> his studies on cross-cultural human emotions and how people would create
> the same shapes cross-culturally when asked to move their fingers to
> indicate an emotion. This bothered one of the New Left "cultures are
> unique" people in the audience.
>
> I tend to disbelieve the idea that "nobody outside our culture would
> understand us" -- and a lot of things that people in the culture don't
> notice are fairly instantly obvious to people coming in from the outside.
>
> Whether we're inside a culture or outside, we'll be oblivious to some
> aspects of the culture that are obvious to others, insiders or outsiders.
>
> I didn't see Mydnight reacting badly; I saw other people attacking him
> on terms that seemed to be supporting some idea of the Mysterious East
> that only they knew about (and since one of those people was a
> bullshitter by his own admission), I didn't like what I was seeing.
>
> Women know these dynamics better than men <g>.



  #10 (permalink)   Report Post  
samarkand
 
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Heh though, this chinese is urging you not to believe your 50 year old
chinese teacher and get some books to read if you really wish to know.

& seriously, age is not an indication of sagacity and knowledge; 25, 50 or
75, if he is selling you the wrong knowledge, he is selling you the wrong
knowledge.

Danny

"Mydnight" > wrote in message
oups.com...
>I know, I should have done it long ago; Sasha gave me this advice too.
>
> He's Chinese, yes. I still believe my Chinese teacher more, though.
> heh.
>





  #11 (permalink)   Report Post  
samarkand
 
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I heard bamboo charcoal kicks up the ion charges in the water which makes it
tastier, but no, I haven't tried that yet.

Pu'er ages optimally in an area with a humidity of between 60-70%. The
charcoal in addition of absorbing excess humidity, also absorbs foregin
odour.

Danny

"kuri" > wrote in message
...
>
> "samarkand" > wrote in message
>
>> The answer is yes if you
>> keep it well. Place the tea in a new earthern jar, and get some clean
>> bamboo charcoal from the local supermarket, or wood ones if you can't
>> find
>> the former. Wrap a few pieces in a cheesecloth and place it in the jar

> with
>> the tea. Cover the jar but not tightly, and place the jar in a cool
>> place
>> above ground, as it can get humid on that level.

>
> Thank you for the informations.
> Your are using the charcoal to reduce humidity or for other purposes ? Is
> it
> good for it to be humid or not ?
>
> BTW, does anybody here uses bamboo charcoal in their kettle ?
>
> Kuri
>
>



  #12 (permalink)   Report Post  
samarkand
 
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Dude,

I do accept that there are millions out there who know more about China than
I do. What I'm saying is that don't believe what you are taught until you
can verify for yourself the truth.

He is a post grad teacher, but that doesn't make him any wiser when it comes
to areas which he might not be familiar with. He was in the cultural
revolution and probably has read the Red Book of Mao, but there are lots of
untold facts being unearthed now about Mao, does he know them all then?

It is up to you to find out the truth really. I believe in what I know as
facts, can you be certain what you are taught by him as facts too? If you
can't be 100% certain, then I'll repeat myself - go and find out. The
decision is yours, believe him and be fooled - in my opinion you are - or
find out the truth for yourself.

Danny

"Mydnight" > wrote in message
ups.com...
> Dude, he's Chinese and a post grad teacher...asking him to Google about
> the most revered person in the country is rather stupid, considering he
> was alive during the time of the Cultural Revolution. He is a teacher
> of Chinese language and history...
>
> You're just going to have to accept that there are other people on the
> planet that know more about China than you do.
>



  #13 (permalink)   Report Post  
samarkand
 
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> "samarkand" > wrote:
>
>> ps. Hey, I'm observing from the ground too Rebecca, as you have said
>> Mydnight does, do I get some praise too? Puuurty pleeese? :")


"Rebecca Ore" > wrote in message
...
> In article >,
>
> Yeah, but be careful to stay away from people who confuse China with
> Japan or claim to have travelled in places Westerners couldn't go after
> the Chinese switched from studying Russian to studying English.
>


"Yeah" - Yeah? That's the best you can enunciate? Oh you break my heart.

:"P

Danny


  #14 (permalink)   Report Post  
Mydnight
 
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it was a joke.....notice "heh" after the "it can be confusing" ending
to my post.

It was my joke. My friend/teacher had nothing with it. And I politely
suggest that you don't try to make claims about someone having or not
having sagacity without ever having met them.

Idiot.

You slightly accused me as being dogmatic, but you seem to be the one
that cannot let this post rest until everyone in the free world
believes that you are the person that is 100 percent correct. Just
because you are Chinese, and you've read x number of books about China
doesn't mean we should believe you more than someone else.

  #15 (permalink)   Report Post  
Mydnight
 
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I've said it probably 20 times in this tread and elsewhere that "I
don't claim to be an expert on China or Chinese things". I DO believe
that being here and learning from people that were raised in this
countries culture has it's merits.

Judging by your English level (saying that you're 25), you probably
weren't raised on the mainland. Where exactly do you hail from? Are
we getting information from someone that's only read books on the topic?



  #16 (permalink)   Report Post  
kuri
 
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"Mydnight" > wrote in message

> Judging by your English level (saying that you're 25), you probably
> weren't raised on the mainland. Where exactly do you hail from? Are
> we getting information from someone that's only read books on the topic?


If the question was about President Kennedy, someone could say : "I've
talked to my American friend, a smart guy in his 50's, specialist in that or
that, he was raised here, has a resume as long as the Great Wall, so he was
already living there when JFK was shot, he saw it on TV, first hand
knowledge, etc.... and he says JFK was certainly born in a shanty town in
Boston because it's unlikely illiterate poor Irish of that time could afford
anything else. About poor migrants literacy rate, I can see it myself, bla
bla bla....JFK's middle name Fitzgerald must have been added later as his
uneducated parents couldn't have thought of giving middle names to their
kids. Other hypothesis are not impossible, but so unlikely. Why Fitzgerald ?
We'll never know, ask 5 Americans, you'll get 5 different answers. What you
read in books is crap I won't believe cos I can get first-hand knowledge. I
am in the US, so I know better than you all posting from
China/Zimbabwe/Australia or those that are in the US but get knowledge from
books. "

Replace JFK by Mao and that's just what you are doing, for our greatest fun.

Kuri

  #17 (permalink)   Report Post  
kuri
 
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"samarkand" > wrote in message

> I heard bamboo charcoal kicks up the ion charges in the water which makes

it
> tastier, but no, I haven't tried that yet.


I use charcoal filters in cold water, they kill the nasty chemical
aftertaste. I was wondering about boiling the water with the charcoal.

> Pu'er ages optimally in an area with a humidity of between 60-70%.


Then a jar kept in my place should be OK.

>The
> charcoal in addition of absorbing excess humidity, also absorbs foregin
> odour.


I have blocks of charcoals for my shoe closet, and on the package it says it
prevents molds (not explaining how).
I was wondering if the charcoal wouldn't negatively affect the *beasties*
that are fermenting the tea.

Kuri

  #18 (permalink)   Report Post  
samarkand
 
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You heh got heh me heh wrong heh eejit heh.

It's not that I'm not letting this post rest what I have suggested if you
read carefully again my posts is that I'm asking you not to take what your
teacher or anyone has to say wholesale but to seek proof for yourself to
validate anybody's words but apparently you are too defensive of your
teacher and I did not make claims about someone I've not met but based on
your words whom you have made him out to be the infallible one so who's the
one calling idiot here?

You heh dogmatic heh? Nah heh. Just heh believing heh easily heh.


"Mydnight" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> it was a joke.....notice "heh" after the "it can be confusing" ending
> to my post.
>
> It was my joke. My friend/teacher had nothing with it. And I politely
> suggest that you don't try to make claims about someone having or not
> having sagacity without ever having met them.
>
> Idiot.
>
> You slightly accused me as being dogmatic, but you seem to be the one
> that cannot let this post rest until everyone in the free world
> believes that you are the person that is 100 percent correct. Just
> because you are Chinese, and you've read x number of books about China
> doesn't mean we should believe you more than someone else.
>



  #19 (permalink)   Report Post  
samarkand
 
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Omagosh. Are you stereotyping here just because you have met Chinese from
mainland who can't hold a candle to your spoken level of English?

Of course I read topics on Mao, if I were brought up in that turbulent era I
would have been around your teacher's age. There are also a huge amount of
topics and discussions on Mao on the internet, you should google around. Or
hit the bookshops and seek out Edgar Snow's transcript on Mao's life, albeit
slightly fabricated, or a chinese book published in Taiwan titled "The
Mystery of Mao Ze Dong" (Mao Ze Dong Zhi Mi) edited bu Xiao Feng, Ming Jun,
et al (Chapter 3, pages 20-21, paragraphs 5-7)

After combing through several books on Mao, the above is the only one that
bothers to mention the genesis and meaning of his name.

At least I bother to do the research, sir.


>
> Judging by your English level (saying that you're 25), you probably
> weren't raised on the mainland. Where exactly do you hail from? Are
> we getting information from someone that's only read books on the topic?
>



  #20 (permalink)   Report Post  
samarkand
 
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Oh, and I should ask you to refrain from using such expressive name-calling.
You are marring Rebecca's good opinion of you.

Heh.

"Mydnight" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> it was a joke.....notice "heh" after the "it can be confusing" ending
> to my post.
>
> It was my joke. My friend/teacher had nothing with it. And I politely
> suggest that you don't try to make claims about someone having or not
> having sagacity without ever having met them.
>
> Idiot.
>
> You slightly accused me as being dogmatic, but you seem to be the one
> that cannot let this post rest until everyone in the free world
> believes that you are the person that is 100 percent correct. Just
> because you are Chinese, and you've read x number of books about China
> doesn't mean we should believe you more than someone else.
>





  #21 (permalink)   Report Post  
Mydnight
 
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Ok, Ok. I give up. You're right and I'm wrong. I know nothing and
you know everything.

My experience in China has been fruitless.

You have more Chinaness in your pinky finger than I do in my whole
body.


Just drop it and lets please discuss something remotely related to tea
on a newsgroup called rec.food.drink.tea.

  #22 (permalink)   Report Post  
Mydnight
 
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I am not stereotyping. I am, again, speaking from my fruitless
experience. I have taught English in about 5 different provinces
(North, South, East, and West) in China so far, and the overall level
of English even in the key Universities (Tsing Hua included) for
various reasons is far below the level that's to be expected. But this
is another topic that is not related to tea.

Before you continue your crusade in ad homium and disrespect; I quit,
you win.

But, at least prove me wrong again and tell us where you hail from.

  #23 (permalink)   Report Post  
samarkand
 
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*Sigh*
*Sigh*
*Sigh*

http://www.eslitebooks.com/cgi-bin/e...=2910448837008

I merely wish you to find out the truth for yourself. The above is a link
to the book I mentioned earlier, if you are interested.

Right so. Enough said.

Back to Mao Ze Dong. Here's another link to a small picture of Mao
inpsecting a tea plantation in Kang Shan in the Westlake region. There are
several legends associating Mao with tea in China, this is one of them.
Smoking and tea drinking are two of his most indispensible things in life,
especially tea - Westlake Dragonwell (Xi Hu Long Jing) was a daily
indulgence, brewed strong and thick.

Mao once told his persinal physician Xu Tao: In my life I have 4
medications: Eat, Sleep, Drink Tea, Defecate. There's no other medication
better than these, if I can perform them daily.

http://www.casad.ac.cn/2005-5/200552494737.htm


"Mydnight" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> Ok, Ok. I give up. You're right and I'm wrong. I know nothing and
> you know everything.
>
> My experience in China has been fruitless.
>
> You have more Chinaness in your pinky finger than I do in my whole
> body.
>
>
> Just drop it and lets please discuss something remotely related to tea
> on a newsgroup called rec.food.drink.tea.
>



  #24 (permalink)   Report Post  
samarkand
 
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Your experience is not completely fruitless. Almost all of people from
mainland China I have come across speak awkward English, they learned the
grammar but missed out on the nuance of words, just as anyone learning a
foreign tongue would; lacking an opportunity to use the language daily is a
setback, hence not many of them speak fluently.

I was raised in the mainland, completed education in Vancouver, and work in
Singapore.

Not really proving you wrong, is it?


"Mydnight" > wrote in message
oups.com...
>I am not stereotyping. I am, again, speaking from my fruitless
> experience. I have taught English in about 5 different provinces
> (North, South, East, and West) in China so far, and the overall level
> of English even in the key Universities (Tsing Hua included) for
> various reasons is far below the level that's to be expected. But this
> is another topic that is not related to tea.
>
> Before you continue your crusade in ad homium and disrespect; I quit,
> you win.
>
> But, at least prove me wrong again and tell us where you hail from.
>



  #25 (permalink)   Report Post  
Dog Ma 1
 
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- Charcoal is not a good desiccant; will not dehumidify effectively.

- "bamboo charcoal kicks up the ion charges in the water which makes it
tastier" - slightly bizarre and probably meaningless from a scientific
perspective.

- " I use charcoal filters in cold water, they kill the nasty chemical
aftertaste. I was wondering about boiling the water with the charcoal." -
Boiling will cause unpleasant chemicals to desorb from the charcoal, putting
them back into the water. Best to use on cold water, and remove charcoal
before heating. In fact, some activated charcoals (there are many types) can
be reactivated by boiling in water - like reactivating a desiccant by
baking.

DM





  #26 (permalink)   Report Post  
Dog Ma 1
 
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> It was my joke. My friend/teacher had nothing with it. And I politely
> suggest that you don't try to make claims about someone having or not
> having sagacity without ever having met them.
>
> You slightly accused me as being dogmatic, but you seem to be the one
> that cannot let this post rest until everyone in the free world
> believes that you are the person that is 100 percent correct. Just
> because you are Chinese, and you've read x number of books about China
> doesn't mean we should believe you more than someone else.


A retired executive once said:
"Rely not on the teacher/person, but on the teaching. Rely not on the words
of the teaching, but on the
spirit of the words. Rely not on theory, but on experience.Do not believe in
anything simply because you
have heard it. Do not believe in traditions because they have been handed
down for many generations. Do
not believe anything because it is spoken and rumored by many. Do not
believe in anything because it is
written in your religious books. Do not believe in anything merely on the
authority of your teachers and
elders. But after observation and analysis, when you find that anything
agrees with reason and is
conducive to the good and the benefit of one and all, then accept it and
live up to it."

For context, see, e.g.:

http://www.buddhistinformation.com/the_kalama_sutra.htm

ObTea: the Buddha was known to prefer a robust, organically grown second- or
autumn-flush Darjeeling (wisdom coming with maturity), with a few symbolic
grains of Demerara sugar (while sweetness arises from within, it is helpful
to have a pointer to the Way) and a splash of skim milk (help to employ
underprivileged cows, but nothing in excess).


  #27 (permalink)   Report Post  
Natarajan Krishnaswami
 
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On 2005-05-29, Dog Ma 1 > wrote:
> http://www.buddhistinformation.com/the_kalama_sutra.htm
>
> ObTea: the Buddha was known to prefer a robust, organically grown second- or
> autumn-flush Darjeeling (wisdom coming with maturity), with a few symbolic
> grains of Demerara sugar (while sweetness arises from within, it is helpful
> to have a pointer to the Way) and a splash of skim milk (help to employ
> underprivileged cows, but nothing in excess).


But this is subject to debate; e.g., according to the Kalami Sutra, he
preferred whole-leaf Assam. This tea's character is inteded to evoke
the virtues of equanimity (it can take milk or not) and moderation,
(drinking oversteeped Assam shows that sorrow can caused by excessive
attachment of the leaf to the water).


N.
  #28 (permalink)   Report Post  
pilo_
 
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In article >,
"samarkand" > wrote:

> You heh got heh me heh wrong heh eejit heh.


this is nauseating.

ignore each other.

puhlease.

p*
  #29 (permalink)   Report Post  
Melinda
 
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"Natarajan Krishnaswami" > wrote in message
...
and moderation,
> (drinking oversteeped Assam shows that sorrow can caused by excessive
> attachment of the leaf to the water).
>
>
> N.


Good grief. Attachment permeates everything doesn't it?

Melinda


  #30 (permalink)   Report Post  
Michael Plant
 
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Natarajan 5/29/05


> On 2005-05-29, Dog Ma 1 > wrote:
>>
http://www.buddhistinformation.com/the_kalama_sutra.htm
>>
>> ObTea: the Buddha was known to prefer a robust, organically grown second- or
>> autumn-flush Darjeeling (wisdom coming with maturity), with a few symbolic
>> grains of Demerara sugar (while sweetness arises from within, it is helpful
>> to have a pointer to the Way) and a splash of skim milk (help to employ
>> underprivileged cows, but nothing in excess).

>
> But this is subject to debate; e.g., according to the Kalami Sutra, he
> preferred whole-leaf Assam. This tea's character is inteded to evoke
> the virtues of equanimity (it can take milk or not) and moderation,
> (drinking oversteeped Assam shows that sorrow can caused by excessive
> attachment of the leaf to the water).
>
>
> N.


Natarajan and Dogma,

I'm not sure which translation you are using for the Sutra, but in the
orginal Pali I'm sure the [s] would replace the [k]. A deeper reading
reveals that the sutra actually contains instructions as to what one is
expected to eat with the sacred Assam Tea. (Some translators reference this
as Darjeeling. In addtion, there is of course controversy as to whether the
Sutra actually contains a prescribed or proscribed list of food items.)

Hope this helps clarify.

Michael



  #31 (permalink)   Report Post  
Derek
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Sun, 29 May 2005 18:23:10 GMT, pilo_ wrote:

> In article >,
> "samarkand" > wrote:
>
>> You heh got heh me heh wrong heh eejit heh.

>
> this is nauseating.
>
> ignore each other.
>
> puhlease.
>
> p*


Oh, A-freakin'-men!

If I wanted to deal with P***ing contests, I'd reread the "Defiant
versus Whitstar" threads over in alt.tv.star-trek.DS9.

--
Derek

"It is often merely for an excuse that we say things are impossible."
-- Francois de La Rochefoucauld
  #32 (permalink)   Report Post  
Derek
 
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Default

On Mon, 30 May 2005 19:35:38 -0400, Derek wrote:

> If I wanted to deal with P***ing contests, I'd reread the "Defiant
> versus Whitstar" threads over in alt.tv.star-trek.DS9.


Apologies to the group.

By posting when I was rushed and already in a bad mood, I made a
comment that is far from what I would normally post.

In doing so, I violated "Derek's 4th Rule of Usenet" TWICE in the same
post.

--
Derek

"My definition of a free society is a society where it is safe to be
unpopular." -- Adlai E. Stevenson Jr. (Speech in Detroit, 7 Oct. 1952)
  #33 (permalink)   Report Post  
samarkand
 
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Last Words...

Anyone still interested in the meaning in Mao's name, or a glimpse into the
Chinese system of names, here's a book that you can borrow from your
library:

Mao : A Life, by Philip Short

UK publisher: John Murray, ISBN: 0719566762

US publishers:
Owl Books, reprint 2001, ISBN: 0805066381
Henry Colt & Company, Inc, ISBN: 0805031154


Heh.

Danny
Exit, persued by a bear.


  #34 (permalink)   Report Post  
Alex Chaihorsky
 
Posts: n/a
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"Rebecca Ore" > wrote in message
...
> In article >,
> "samarkand" > wrote:
>


> One of the problems of jumping into a flame war is that the person being
> attacked (kuri and Sasha were the main people saying the undefensible
> things) doesn't tend to at that point distinguish between people
> offering polite suggestions and people trying to score points. Mydnight
> withdrew at that point. Sasha tried to continue the attack like the
> person he has appeared to be all through this -- someone whose own
> stories about his travels in China and his experiences with the captured
> Japanese tea person sound to this teacher of English like stories that
> he made up. I am willing to call him a liar until proven otherwise.
>


I have been traveling and working during this priceless exchange and missed
these peals of Rebecca's wisdom.
I am willing to prove the provable (my travel and work in ex-military
formerly closed territories in China) of what I was claiming with plane
tickets, original work agreements, official films of local TV stations
(featuring yours truly) about opening of our offices in rural towns just
south of Inner Mongolia and other things. But she has to step up to the
plate and put her money where her mouth is. We both shell send a money order
for say $5,000 to Michael Plant, Lew or DogMa (or any other well known
member of the group) and let him or some other group of judges decide if I
ever lied about my travel and work in China. The winning side will gets the
money. Until she does that, her baseless accusations remain what they are -
empty barkings. But as Turks say "It khurer, karavan kecher" - "The bitch
barks, but the caravan goes". So be it in our case too.

Certainly I cannot prove what happened almost 30 years ago on the shores of
Olenek river in Northern Siberia. And I do not intend to. This was my
personal experience and I do not give a flying puer cake if some
self-absorbed, yet another "professor" from CUNY believes me or not. But not
believing me is one thing and calling me a liar - another. Notice how this
"teacher of English" and an American, I presume, throws away ever so easily
the time honored Western tradition of presuming innocence until proven
guilty. She calls me a liar "until proven otherwise"! She feels that she has
a right to call a person a liar and demand that the only way she would
retract from that accusation if I "prove" myself to be right? No, lady, you
will have to risk some money on the table if you want proof. Until you do
that, your empty accusations only show others what you are made of.
I leave it to the public on this forum to judge why she would be so angry at
someone who she never met in her life? May be some of my remarks on her
ridiculous posts had something to do with it? But there were several posters
who ridiculed her "educated" opinion and she never attacked them... Eureka!
May be she had a Russian boyfriend who run away from her self-absorbed
attitude? That would at least explain her awful, louty Russian.

I think that she does have some alternative motives (like assuming in her
other post that I am rich, which I guess in CUNY's world is the biggest sin
in the universe). I have to disappoint her - I am not rich (moneywise) at
all - by any standards (unfortunately). However I lived a very rich life
filled with love, friendship, adventures and love again. And I think I have
done it honorably. I made a lot of lifetime friends (God bless them) and
certainly some envious enemies, (God bless them too). And that is why all I
feel toward the poor "linguist" is a deep sense of pity.

Sasha.


  #35 (permalink)   Report Post  
Marlene Wood
 
Posts: n/a
Default

> I don't care if you aren't lying, either. It sure sounds like bullshit
> to me.
>
> <Plonk>


I don't usually speak up in flame wars. I like to form my own opinion, and
keep it to myself while I watch the circus. I just had to this time. Just
what does the word 'Plonk' mean in this post?
It brings to mind two images:
1 A person 'plonking' down a file on a desk in front of another person,
crossing their arms infront of their chest, glaring, and barely keeping
themselves from sticking out their tounge.
2 A person collapsing (plonking) into a chair in a huff, glaring, and barely
keeping themselves from sticking out their tongue.
I realise that this is probobly not what was intended, so please correct me
so I can go back to enjoying the flames.




  #36 (permalink)   Report Post  
Alex Chaihorsky
 
Posts: n/a
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"Plonk" in USENET lingo usually means that a person after saying some words
returns (plonks) into whatever parallel universe he or she popped out from
to say these words. Usually indicated that an author is not interested in a
response and won't wait or check for it. Like a child that shouted an
insult and closed his eyes and ears after that not to hear anything back and
therefore have the last word. However PLONK may be used by a grown up too,
when it is used to just say a side comment that most likely won't require an
answer, or just without getting into the substance too deep.
But your number 1 suggestion may also be a case.

Sasha.


"Marlene Wood" > wrote in message
...
>> I don't care if you aren't lying, either. It sure sounds like bullshit
>> to me.
>>
>> <Plonk>

>
> I don't usually speak up in flame wars. I like to form my own opinion, and
> keep it to myself while I watch the circus. I just had to this time. Just
> what does the word 'Plonk' mean in this post?
> It brings to mind two images:
> 1 A person 'plonking' down a file on a desk in front of another person,
> crossing their arms infront of their chest, glaring, and barely keeping
> themselves from sticking out their tounge.
> 2 A person collapsing (plonking) into a chair in a huff, glaring, and
> barely keeping themselves from sticking out their tongue.
> I realise that this is probobly not what was intended, so please correct
> me so I can go back to enjoying the flames.
>



  #37 (permalink)   Report Post  
Scott Dorsey
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Marlene Wood > wrote:
>keep it to myself while I watch the circus. I just had to this time. Just
>what does the word 'Plonk' mean in this post?


It is the sound of a newbie being dropped into a killfile. Original usage
was in talk.bizarre in the late 1980s but it seems to have spread over the
years.
--scott


--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
  #38 (permalink)   Report Post  
Mike Petro
 
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Marlene Wood wrote:
> > I don't care if you aren't lying, either. It sure sounds like bullshit
> > to me.
> >
> > <Plonk>

>
> I don't usually speak up in flame wars. I like to form my own opinion, and
> keep it to myself while I watch the circus. I just had to this time. Just
> what does the word 'Plonk' mean in this post?
> It brings to mind two images:
> 1 A person 'plonking' down a file on a desk in front of another person,
> crossing their arms infront of their chest, glaring, and barely keeping
> themselves from sticking out their tounge.
> 2 A person collapsing (plonking) into a chair in a huff, glaring, and barely
> keeping themselves from sticking out their tongue.
> I realise that this is probobly not what was intended, so please correct me
> so I can go back to enjoying the flames.


Hi Marlene,

In USENET netiquette PLONK is an acronym used when one poster chooses
to "ignore" another persons posts. In older Unix based newsreaders
it was called a "killfile" which meant that anything sent to the
killfile was automatically deleted before the reader ever had a chance
to see it. You could send a post to the killfile based on any number of
different criteria, the most common one being a specific person in the
"From" field but it could also be a keyword in the subject or body
of the message etc. In modern Windows based newsreaders you can often
do it by right-clicking a poster and selecting "Ignore" and then
you will not (theoretically) see any posts sent by that person again.
It usually only works with dedicated newsreader programs, if you use
Google or some other web based reader you will not readily see this
option.

Mike
http://www.pu-erh.net

  #39 (permalink)   Report Post  
Mike Petro
 
Posts: n/a
Default



Marlene Wood wrote:
> > I don't care if you aren't lying, either. It sure sounds like bullshit
> > to me.
> >
> > <Plonk>

>
> I don't usually speak up in flame wars. I like to form my own opinion, and
> keep it to myself while I watch the circus. I just had to this time. Just
> what does the word 'Plonk' mean in this post?
> It brings to mind two images:
> 1 A person 'plonking' down a file on a desk in front of another person,
> crossing their arms infront of their chest, glaring, and barely keeping
> themselves from sticking out their tounge.
> 2 A person collapsing (plonking) into a chair in a huff, glaring, and barely
> keeping themselves from sticking out their tongue.
> I realise that this is probobly not what was intended, so please correct me
> so I can go back to enjoying the flames.



Hi Marlene,

In USENET netiquette PLONK is an acronym used when one poster chooses
to "ignore" another persons posts. In older Unix based newsreaders
it was called a "killfile" which meant that anything sent to the
killfile was automatically deleted before the reader even had a chance
to see it. You could send a post to the killfile based on any number of
different criteria, the most common one being a specific person in the
"From" field but it could also be a keyword in the subject or body
of the message etc. In modern Windows based newsreaders you can often
do it by right-clicking a poster and selecting "Ignore" and then
you will not (theoretically) see any posts sent by that person again.
It usually only works with dedicated newsreader programs, if you use
Google or some other web based reader you will not readily see this
option.

Mike
http://www.pu-erh.net

  #40 (permalink)   Report Post  
Mike Petro
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Wed, 22 Jun 2005 15:56:33 GMT, Rebecca Ore
> wrote:

>In article .com>,
> "Mike Petro" > wrote:
>
>> In modern Windows based newsreaders you can often
>> do it by right-clicking a poster and selecting "Ignore" and then
>> you will not (theoretically) see any posts sent by that person again.

>
>Mac and Unix users have better newsreaders than most of those commonly
>available for Windows users, but I think Agent can filter on topic, xref
>headers, and such. I use MT-NewsWatcher for Mac which can filter on all
>sorts of things, including threads, from lines, crossposts, without
>having to write regular expressions.


Yes, I use agent myself and it can do most of the stuff the Xreaders
can do. Albeit you are right in that you might have to write an
expression or two to thoroughly filter some stuff.

Mike
Mike Petro
http://www.pu-erh.net
"In this work, when it shall be found that much is omitted, let it not be forgotten that much likewise is performed."
Samuel Johnson, 1775, upon finishing his dictionary.
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