Tea (rec.drink.tea) Discussion relating to tea, the world's second most consumed beverage (after water), made by infusing or boiling the leaves of the tea plant (C. sinensis or close relatives) in water.

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Old 03-07-2013, 04:36 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default Hating my new teapot :-/

It's a porcelain teapot with a built-in strainer: small holes in the
pot's body where the spout is attached. It's just a mess to clean,
since I can't get rid of the leaves through the spout when I rinse it!

Any cleaning tips or techniques I'm overlooking because of my lack of
previous experience with this kind of teapot?

TIA

--
Saluti

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Old 03-07-2013, 08:27 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default Hating my new teapot :-/

Dario Niedermann writes:

It's a porcelain teapot with a built-in strainer: small holes in the
pot's body where the spout is attached. It's just a mess to clean,
since I can't get rid of the leaves through the spout when I rinse it!

Any cleaning tips or techniques I'm overlooking because of my lack of
previous experience with this kind of teapot?


While brewing, you could confine the leaves within a teaball or sack or
the like, but that tends to degrade the quality of what comes out the
spout. If you want to use a big teapot, the best compromise in my
opinion is to use an external strainer rather than an internal one. May
I add that this is one of many reasons I usually prefer to use a gaiwan?

/Lew
---
Lew Perin /
http://babelcarp.org
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Old 04-07-2013, 05:05 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default Hating my new teapot :-/

Lewis Perin wrote:

While brewing, you could confine the leaves within a teaball or sack
or the like, but that tends to degrade the quality of what comes out
the spout. If you want to use a big teapot, the best compromise in my
opinion is to use an external strainer rather than an internal one.


Infuriatingly, I still have to use a handheld strainer when pouring
because the builtin one doesn't catch 100% of the leaves. So, basically,
it's just there to annoy me when i clean the pot.

May I add that this is one of many reasons I usually prefer to use a
gaiwan?


My next teapot will be either a gaiwan or a Turkish çaydanlık, I have
to make up my mind (i.e.: eventually I'll get both. And a brown betty.)


--
Bye
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Old 04-07-2013, 07:12 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default Hating my new teapot :-/

Hi Dario,

It's a porcelain teapot with a built-in strainer: small holes in the
pot's body where the spout is attached. It's just a mess to clean,
since I can't get rid of the leaves through the spout when I rinse it!

Any cleaning tips or techniques I'm overlooking because of my lack of
previous experience with this kind of teapot?


I am accustomed to using a hand air blower to get rid of such leaves.
Like thoses used to clean lenses of a camera.
It works pretty well!

--
Julien LIE

Et vous allez reprendre votre bateau Et, mergitur ou pas,
fluctuat ! Compris ! Fluctuat ! (Goudurix)
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Old 05-07-2013, 11:44 AM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default Hating my new teapot :-/

Julien LIE wrote:

I am accustomed to using a hand air blower to get rid of such leaves.
Like thoses used to clean lenses of a camera.
It works pretty well!


Interesting tip, can you elaborate? Do you wait for the leaves to be dry?

--
Best regards


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Old 06-07-2013, 05:59 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default Hating my new teapot :-/

Hi Dario,

I am accustomed to using a hand air blower to get rid of such leaves.
Like thoses used to clean lenses of a camera.
It works pretty well!


Interesting tip, can you elaborate? Do you wait for the leaves to be dry?


I do not wait for the leaves to be dry. They go away when I use the
hand air blower. It's very easy to do with that tool :-)

--
Julien LIE

Et vous allez reprendre votre bateau Et, mergitur ou pas,
fluctuat ! Compris ! Fluctuat ! (Goudurix)
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Old 06-08-2013, 10:41 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default Hating my new teapot :-/

A tea needle or some other such thin implement helps to get rid of clogs. I have some thin brushes meant for cleaning straws (bought in baby supply store) that would get the insides of a spout really clean.
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Old 12-08-2013, 01:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Warren Peltier View Post
A tea needle or some other such thin implement helps to get rid of clogs. I have some thin brushes meant for cleaning straws (bought in baby supply store) that would get the insides of a spout really clean.
Thanks for the tips, You can use lemon juice which is used as a bleaching agent to clean out stains and straints. It looks shine and happy to use.
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Old 26-08-2013, 02:07 AM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default Hating my new teapot :-/

On Thursday, 4 July 2013 17:05:01 UTC+1, Dario Niedermann wrote:
Lewis Perin wrote:



While brewing, you could confine the leaves within a teaball or sack


or the like, but that tends to degrade the quality of what comes out


the spout. If you want to use a big teapot, the best compromise in my


opinion is to use an external strainer rather than an internal one.




Infuriatingly, I still have to use a handheld strainer when pouring

because the builtin one doesn't catch 100% of the leaves. So, basically,

it's just there to annoy me when i clean the pot.


Perhaps you should stop "cleaning". What are you doimg? I mean really, just tip it up and scoop out what does't fall out cleanly, and if that's too much trouble, just swirl round some fresh water and tip over. It might also help to get a cleaner pour, to wash the tea before steeping. I use Turkish tea and make lemon-tea and both these get rid of staining by the brown teas. I'm wondering whether the brown stains are sulphur compounds. Anyone know one way or other?





May I add that this is one of many reasons I usually prefer to use a


gaiwan?




My next teapot will be either a gaiwan or a Turkish çaydanlık, I have

to make up my mind (i.e.: eventually I'll get both. And a brown betty.)





--

Bye




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