Tea (rec.drink.tea) Discussion relating to tea, the world's second most consumed beverage (after water), made by infusing or boiling the leaves of the tea plant (C. sinensis or close relatives) in water.

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Old 22-10-2010, 03:06 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default Taiwan reroasting

My wifes brotherinlaw who moved to Taiwan several years ago bought
some reroasted TGY and DongDing on a recent visit. He said it is all
the rage now there. I previously had some reroasted gaoshan. The
singularly distinctive tastes are replaced by more complex woodsy
malty finishing flavors. It is not meant to be drank on an empty
stomach. After several cups I feel a headache coming on before
breakfast. I was pleased that my Bai Hao got the approval from his
wife who is a Hakka descendent who grew up in the tea farming area of
Northern Taiwan. I suspect it could be better and will know when some
is shipped. I noticed all the packaging looked like shrink wrap with
nitrogen. Even the street vendors can package tea this way. He wasnt
aware of any nitrogen cannisters. I cant believe a vacuum pump could
create this kind of seal. Their three year son understands Mandarin
from his mother and English from his father. We played a game where I
spoke Chinese and he would indicate by a laugh how bad it was.
Everybody was laughing but me.

Jim

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Old 22-10-2010, 03:51 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default Taiwan reroasting

Space Cowboy writes:

My wifes brotherinlaw who moved to Taiwan several years ago bought
some reroasted TGY and DongDing on a recent visit.


I'm not sure what you mean here. Is it aged tea or just tea that's been
roasted more than is customary these days in Taiwan?

/Lew
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http://www.panix.com/~perin/babelcarp.html
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Old 22-10-2010, 05:15 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default Taiwan reroasting

On Oct 22, 8:51 am, Lewis Perin wrote:
Space Cowboy writes:
My wifes brotherinlaw who moved to Taiwan several years ago bought
some reroasted TGY and DongDing on a recent visit.


I'm not sure what you mean here. Is it aged tea or just tea that's been
roasted more than is customary these days in Taiwan?

/Lew
---
Lew Perin /


The tea is roasted again after a period of time usually after several
months. This cycle repeats itself for some given number. So the
frequency and the duration between roasts are determining factors. I
know the TGY was roasted twice over a year. The dry and infused leaf
was black with rich red color. I think it is an attempt to 'age'
their teas. I mentioned in an early post I tasted a PouChong from
1968. The leaf is dry and infused black with deep red color
infusion. It has a completely different taste profile.

Jim

Jim
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Old 24-10-2010, 12:58 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default Taiwan reroasting

'Re-roasting' might refer to the very common Taiwanese practice of
taking a batch of aready more or less fully dried tea and placing it
in a basket over a very low heat (from an electric coil) for several
hours from time to time (every few weeks or months). The heat is
around 50-60 degrees. It is a particularly important operation in
developing the flavor of Oriental Beauty, but it can be and is used to
intensify the taste of almost any kind of tea. The tea is loose, not
packed, of course. The process is known as 烘焙 hongbei. I say it is
'Taiwanese' because that is where I have seen it, I assume it is is
equally common in mainland China. The electric stoves are now quite
popular in Korea, too, both among tea makers for enhancing the taste
of Korean green tea and among tea-dealers to give a boost to the taste
of imported Oolongs before they are packed. No headaches anywhere in
sight, so far as I know, though.

Br A
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Old 24-10-2010, 03:43 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default Taiwan reroasting

I do understand it is done in small quantities. Almost like someones
private stash. Also premium leaves are used. I am very sensitive too
overcooked anything. It just a tea I couldnt drink too much of on an
empty stomach. Its like cooked vegetables what you start out with and
end up with taste wise are two different things. What are the
repetitions to produce OB. I assumed it was one oxidation drying/
roasting step.

Jim

On Oct 24, 5:58 am, Brother Anthony wrote:
'Re-roasting' might refer to the very common Taiwanese practice of
taking a batch of aready more or less fully dried tea and placing it
in a basket over a very low heat (from an electric coil) for several
hours from time to time (every few weeks or months). The heat is
around 50-60 degrees. It is a particularly important operation in
developing the flavor of Oriental Beauty, but it can be and is used to
intensify the taste of almost any kind of tea. The tea is loose, not
packed, of course. The process is known as 烘焙 hongbei. I say it is
'Taiwanese' because that is where I have seen it, I assume it is is
equally common in mainland China. The electric stoves are now quite
popular in Korea, too, both among tea makers for enhancing the taste
of Korean green tea and among tea-dealers to give a boost to the taste
of imported Oolongs before they are packed. No headaches anywhere in
sight, so far as I know, though.

Br A



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